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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

Spalding's 
Athletic Library 




Anticipating the present ten- 
d.n.y of the American people 

da healthful method of living 

Library was established in 1892 or 
the purpose of encouraging ath- 
in every form, not only by 
publishing the .official n, lea and 
records pertaining to the various 

until today SoaUhuB a Athletic 
Library is unique in its own par- 
t S f. -hi and has been conceded 
the greatest educationa ser.eson 

that haa ever been compied 

1 The publication of a d stinct 

of books <levoted to athletic 

,es and designed 

r Pla »„r lv 
' - of the first in America 

SsSSwaw 

.Xmg\be initial 
at iiitervlTwith other handbooks on the 



&zffii&&& 



A. ' L 

number, which mi f< 
aporta promii 

" ",?viT all l«.ks devoted 

Spalding in all of its u, , : ',„ Spalding's Official 

to the national game. Tl n Record both of which 

Haw Ball Guide and Spalding's Official Baae Ball »« ^.^ to hjs early 

•• the per*. m of M r. A. < ■■ f '^"J ,■}• c |,amnion Boston 

,.t stop, however, with 

S-76. His I Mr. Spalding 

n, pertaining to baae beJ not a • . ; r M," h _ „„, 1n:lt the 

Vith Mr. Spalding sable 
place, wm 

coun .. t saying. . number haa been under 

iaaue of the nraxnu gulUvaIli president 

tho ,; ' "' r, r m D a y and the toUl *"'™°l 

of considerably ° vcr '! ?! 
rW reach an aggregate of cm . constitute 

» „ndrd seventeen years ago. 

.... Uhm -" f "' ,„, s,!-!.- the larger 

MM PMCt • V ': . . .'!•■; which gave occa- 

" ^SJtors was a subject of com- 

;.;ily the only established field 



th«h 

of which mr* 

rrally first a 



I 



hit* J fillK 



f wa* Known only l»Jj* I 
voiruo and baaa boll 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETTC LIBRARt 

sport, and that in a professional way; basket ball had just been invented, 
athletics for the schoolboy— and schoolgirl— were almost unknown, and 
an advocate of claas contests in athletics in the schools could not (ret a 
hearing-. To-day we find the greatest body of athletes in the world is 
the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, which has had 
an entry list at its annual games of over two thousand, and in whose 
"elementary series" in base ball last year 106 schools competed for the 
trophy emblematic of the championship. 

While Spalding's Athletic Library cannot claim that the rapid growth 
of athletics in this country is due to It solely, the fact cannot be denied 
that the books have had a great deal to do with its encouragement, by 
printing the official rules and instructions for playing the various games 
at a nominal price, within the reach of everyone, with the Bole object 
that its series might be complete and the one place where a | 
could look with absolute certainty for the particular book in which he 
might be interested. . 

In selecting the editors and writers for the various books, the lead- 
ing authority in his particular line has been obtained, with the 
that no collection of books on athletic subjects can compare with 
Spalding's Athletic Library for the prominence of the various authors 
•far ability to present their subjects in a thorough and practical 
manner. , ... 

A short sketch of a few of those who have edited some of the lead- 
ing numbers of Spalding's Athletic Library is given herewith : 




«hip meeting in Amp 
' ion with Ame 



tary Ame 
tfaa Pas** 

IMMHH9 



JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

ident American Sports Publishing Corn- 
entered < Ins; house of Frank 
in 1878, and has been connected continu- 
vith the publishing business sin 
ao as athletic editor of various New 
•pers: was a <■ ; one of 
ranizers of the Amateur Athletic Union 
United States: has been actively on its 
it governors since its organization until 
■MBt time, and Ptaseideni for two suc- 
t terms; has attended every champion- 
's and has officiated in some capacity in 
jr championships track and field games 
ttant American 

!•<• 1/. ,1-iana Pan • a . 1 M '■ Iti' t . •*-'<• 

< 
-. at J..: •''■.*:. 1 : - ■ ■ ' 1 ■ '. M-rrt- 
l. ■ ,.• I ■ ■ . : ■ i . • i.-r of 



tier Olympic A I rancisco; 

rsey A. C, Knickerbocker A. C; 
the A. A. U. f' "ars: pre 

viih Dr. Lather H. Gulick organi; 
** of N«'W York, and la now chaimu 



and one of the or 
appointed by Prt 
Games at Atheni 
(Greece) for nil 

t»ni\'—l i|r«--ial 



<-1.00l» 

I work 
York ; 
■ ml'ic 
MOM 
■; ap- 
mplc 



Gamee at London, 190*; ■■ ' Clellan. 1W8, as m«n«* 

of the Board of Education of Greater New York. 



eVfTORS OF SP AI. DIN G 3 S ATHLETIC LI BRARY 

WALTER CAMP 

For quarter of a century Mr. Walter Camp 
of Yale has occupied a leading: position in col- 
lege athletics. It is immaterial what organiza- 
tion is suggested for college athletics, or for 
-rment of conditions, insofar as college 
athletics is concerned. Mr. Camp has always 
played an important part in J 4 ? eo " fe ,'' e " ce *i 
and the treat interest in and high planeof 
college (port today, are undoubtedly due more 
to Mr. Camp than to any other individual Mr 
==- Camp has probably written more on college 

"thletica than any other writer and the leading papers and 1 maga- 
?"]f"of America are always anxious to secure his expert opinion on foot 
ba». track and field athletics, base ball and rowing. Mr Camp h«-;«™*™ 
M , with Yale athletics and is a part of Yale's «™>^£^ t C ^reD 
Jj™ be has lK.cn designated as the "Father of Foot Ball, it is a will 
^"'•^ " fact that during his college career Mr Camp was regarded .as one 
of the best players that ever represented Yale on the base ^ ' «««. M 
wl'«-n we hear of Walter C»mpae a foot ball «p rt r e ,, m 7lwh he is a 
"erhis remarkable knowledge of the gam. ,IL , p " f i.Lil ruide 

dmirer. Mr. Cam,, has edited Spalding/* <>«■<-;'"'' '°fJ^l C Ck 
»ince ,t was first published, and also the Spalding Athletic Ubrarj 'boolc 
on How to Play Foot Hall. There is certainly DO ^ ta *£S5ttanlE 
{"^better qualified to write for Spalding's Athletic Library than Mr, 




DR. LUTHER HALSEY GULICK 
The leading exponent of &&****?& 

in America: one who has worked, hard to im- 
Dresathe value of physical training in the 
Lch"ls when physical training was combined 
with edition' at the St ^"- r Kxpos,t'On n 
UM Dr. QnHck played an , "'' ,0 /'j 1 "^. a ' r ", r , fo " 
... received several awa " ls ,;°5 
n sgo."i work and had many honors conferred 
upon Em; be is tie author of a great many 
hxikH.pn thawWecti lC "''Y l)r C k suilivan 
«tlng on I < >" " f ^''"mTw Y^rk and 

« me i-uhlic set... 'Director of 

*M its first Seer., Ur^gning 

5 T^wln* " achools of Crcater New X^.^Xo? 

"<e position toa, v of the ' K^ U ^,^inTto phy»- 

KS«* lick is an authority on all subjects pertaining to pnya- 

"=*' training and the study of the child. 





JOHN B. FOSTER 

Succor to the late Henry C»adw.ck 

ment of the game. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




TIM MURNANE 

Base Ball editor of the Boston Globe and 
President of the New England league of 
Base Ball Clutw; one of the best known base 
ball men of the country; known from coast 
to coast; is a keen follower of the frame and 
prominent in all its councils; nearly half a 
century ago was one of America's foremost 
players: knows the frame thoroughly and 
writes from the point of view both of player 
and an official. 




HARRY PHILIP BURCHELL 

Sportinff editor of the New York Timea; 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania; 
editor of Spalding's Official Lawn Tennis 
Annual; is an authority on the game; follows 
the movements of the players minutely and 
- itands not only tennis hut all other sub- 
jects that can be classed as athletics; no one 
i ;alified to edit this book than Mr. 
Burr, 




GEORGE T. HEPBRON 

Former Young Men's Christian Association 
ilirw-tor; for many years an official of the 
Athletic League of Young itian 

Association!* of North America; was con- 
nects! with l>r. Lathes II. (iulirk in 1 
i Christian Association w.trk for 



years; became tdentl 
t in its infa 



ing 

Ilr. I 



• and aim editor 
Play Basket Ball. 



basket 

end has fol- 
as the lead- 
Basket Bsll 
k on How to 




JAMES S. MITCHEL 



h..: '.•■' 

• close 

.writs 
sport ; 
s New 



Yurk Sun. 



a '•//VRS O/- SPALLf/JVCS A THLETfCJJB RARi 

MICHAEL C. MURPHY 

The world's most famous athletic trainer, 

thechalpion "Y^'nc I base ZW 

for track and Bold sport*, >-'' «£'>£ e J n V 8 

fields, would run into thousands; he bei • "" 
: „t Yalo University • and I he. 
been particularly successful in d e. 

,,|,t be temed championship teams. 

his rare good judgment has placed him in an 

&£"£ the athletic world; now 

with the'llmversity of T?™*™* 

ins his career has <*rtng<>%£* £g SJ 

diversity of fc BM - i «tt&SiS! AU^Chib;^^^ 
triumph was that of training the famous American team of athletes 
that swept the field at the Olympic Games of 1908 at London. 





DR. C. WARD CRAMPTON 

Succeeded Dr. Gulick as ^rector of pliysirn! 

training in the schools £ ..^S^^TtMetic 
„ secretary of the Public Schools ahiicim. 

nation of Its kind In «K5«% '*„% 

practical alhl. ■<■■ and «'m"^ ! ' ■«« ; *£] 
has I i rs connected with the , phym 

cal training system in the .*^»^ a L°%5 
N.-w y..rk. having had charge of the men 
School of Commerce. 




DR. GEORGE J. FISHER 

Ha* been <• ftZdLVcSSt 

T' Ca L'madesuchaMgh 

nati end Brooklyn. « '"^ ''"^rwa^cl „sen to 

organizer that he was <h°""g 

lther "> VMCAWNort 

'"'"V -" W ,T °.„. I "take 

,, when the totter r. .^« <-< n 

leal tram.ng in the PuDUC 
Schools of Greater New York. 



DR. GEORGE ORTON 

n„ nthletics collet.'.- athletics, particularly 
tra°ck andnek? ft* Bj. S'*t«* £$ 

training of the youth it """''L^. hag hid 

,, 'll-r.,'. ' "■ ,r,ce'anTthe 

-'U^nd'cM^^ 

runner. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRA R i 








FREDERICK R. TOOMBS 

A well known authority on skating:, rowing;, 
boxing, racquets, and other athletic sports; 
was sporting editor of American Press Asso- 
ciation, New York; dramatic editor; is a law- 
yer and has served several terms as a member 
of Assembly of the Legislature of the State of 
New York; has written several novels and 
historical works. 



R. L. WELCH 

A resident of Chicago: the popularity of 
indoor base ball is chiefly due to his efforts; 
a player himself of no mean ability; a first- 
class organizer; he has followed the game of 
indoor base ball from its inception. 



DR. HENRY S. ANDERSON 

Has been connected with Yale University 
for years and is a recognized authority on 
gymnastics: is admitted to be one of the lead- 
ing authorities in America on gymnastic sub- 
jects: is the author of many books on physical 
training. 



CHARLES M. DANIELS 

Just the man to write an authoritative 
book on swimming; the fastest swimmer the 
world has ever known; member New York 
Athletic Club swimming team and an Olym- 
pic champion at Athens in 1906 and London, 
1908. In his book on Swimming, Champion 
Daniels describes just the methods one must 
use to become an expert swimmer. 

GUSTAVE BOJUS 

Mr. Bojus is most thoroughly qualified to 
write intelligently on all subjects pertaining 
to gymnastics and athletics; in his day one 
of America's most famous amateur athletes; 
has competed successfully in gymnastics and 
many other sports for the New York Turn 
Verein; for twenty years he has been prom- 
inent in teaching gymnastics and athletics; 
was responsible for the famous gymnastic 
championship teams of Columbia University: 
now with the Jersey City high schools. 



&DITOKS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 







CHARLES JACOBUS 

Admitted to be the "Father of Roque;" 
one of America's most expert players, win- 
ning the Olympic Championship at St. Louia 
in 1904; an ardent supporter of the game 
and follows it minutely, and much of the 
success of roque is due to his untiring: efforts; 
certainly there is no one better qualified to 
write on this subject than Mr. Jacobus. 



DR. E. B. WARMAN 

Well known as a physical training; expert; 
was probably one of the first to enter the feld 
and is the author of many books on the sub- 
ject; lectures extensively each year all over 
the country. 



W. J. CROMIE 

Now with the University of Pennsylvania; 
was formerly a Y. M. C. A. physical director; 
a keen student of all gymnastic matters; the 
author of many books on subjects pertaining; 
to physical training:. 



G. M. MARTIN 

By profession a physical director of the 
Young; Men's Christian Association; a close 
student of all things gymnastic, and gramea 
for the classes in the gymnasium or clubs. 




PROF. SENAC 

A leader in the fencing- world ; has main 
tained a fencing- school in New York li- 
years and developed a great many c nam 
pions ; understands the science pf fencin* 
thoroughly and the benefit* U b« denve^ 
therefrom. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

Giving the Titles ol all Spalding Athletic Library Books now ^ 
I*- j fa print, grouped for ready reference L ■* J 



SPALDING OFFICIAL ANNUALS 



No. I 
No. IA 
No 2 
No 2A 
No. 3 
No. 
No 
No 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



No. 12 



Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 
Spald 



ngs 
ng's 
ng's 
ng's 
ng's 
ng's 
ng's 



Croup I. Base Ball 

No. 1 Spalding's Official Base Ball 
Guide. 

No. IA Official Base Ball Record. 

No. 202 How to Play Base Ball. 

No. 223 How to Bat. 

No. 232 How to Run Bases. 

No. 230 How to Pitch. 

No. 229 How to Catch. 

No. 225 How to Play First Base. 

No. 226 How to Play Second Base. 

No. 227 How to Play Third Base. 

No. 228 How to Play Shortstop. 

No. 22- How to Play the Outfield. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 

Club. [League. 

How to Organize a Base Ball 

How to Manage a Base Ball 

Club. 
How toTrain a BaseBallTeam 
How to Captain a Base Ball 
HowtoUmpireaGame. [Team 
Technical Base Ball Terms. 
Ready Reckoner of Base Ball 
Percentages. 

BASE BALL AUXILIARIES 

319 MinorLeagueBase Ball Guide 

320 Official Hook National League 
of Prof. Base Ball CI 

Official Handbook National 
Playground Ball Assn. 



No. 

231. 



No. 219 



No. 321 



Croup II. 

No. 2 



ng's Official Base Ball Guide 
ng's Official Base Ball Record 
ng's Official Foot Ball Guide 
ng's Official Soccer Foot Ball Guide 
Official Cricket Guide 
Official Lawn Tennis Annual 
Official Golf Guide 
Official Ice Hockey Cuide 
Official Basket Ball Cuide 
Official Bowling Cuide 
Official Indoor Base Ball Cuide 
ng's Official Roller Polo Cuide 
ng's Official Athletic Almanac 

FOOT BALL AUXILIARY 
No. 332 Spalding's Official Canadian 

Foot Ball Guide. 
No. 335 Spalding's Official Rugby Foot 
Ball Guide. 

Group III. crlchel 

No. 3 Spalding's Official Cricket Guide. 
No. 277 Cricket and How to Play It. 

Group IV. Lawn minis 

No. 4 Spalding's Official Lawn Ten- 
nis Annual. 

No. 157 How to Play Lawn Tennis. 

No. 279 Strokes and Science of Lawn 
Tennis. 

Group V. Coll 

No. 5 Spalding's Official Golf Guide 
No. 276 How to Play Golf. 

Group VI. Hockeu 

No. 6 Spalding's Official Ice Hockey 

Gitii i 

No. 304 How to Play Ice Hockey. 
No. 154 Field Hockey. 

{Lawn Hockey. 
Parlor Hockey. 
Garden Hockey. 
No. 180 Ring Hockey. 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY 

No. 256 Official Handbook Ontario 

Hockey Associa' 

Foot Ball Croup VII. Basket Ball 



Spalding's Official Foot Ball 

Guide. 

No. 334 Code of the Foot Ball Rules. 
No. 324 How to Play Foot Ball. 
No. 2a Spalding's Official Soc 

Ball Guide. 
No. 286 How to Play Soccer. 



No. 7 Spalding's Official Basket 

Ball Guide. 
No. 193 How to Play Basket Ball. 
No. 318 Basket Ball Guide for Women. 

BASKET BALL AUXILIARY 
No. 323 Official Collegiate Basket Ball 

Handbook. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Bowling 

Official Bowling 



Group Vlll. 

No. 8 Spalding's 
Guide. 

Group IX* indoor Base Ball 

No. 9 Spalding's Official Indoor Base 
Ball GuwLe. 

Group X. Polo 

N o. 10 Spalding's Official Roller Polo 

<i itide. 
No. 129 Water Polo. 
No. 199 Equestrian Polo. 

Group xi. Miscellaneous Games 

No. 201 Lacn 

Official Handbook U.S. 

collegiate Lacrosse League. 

Archery. 

Croquet. 

Roque. 
[ Racquets. 
No. 194 < Squash-Racquets. 

(Court Tennis. 
No. 13 Hand Ball 

Quoits. 

Push Ball. 

Curling:. 

Lawn Howls. 

Lawn Games. 

Children's Games. 

xil. Athletics 

No. 12 Spalding's Official Athletic 
Almanac. 
College Athletics. 
All Around Athletics. 
Athletes' Guide. 
Athletic Primer. 

[■ic GamesatAthens.1906 
How to Sprint. 
How to Run 100 Y.-, ■ 
Distance and Cross (Jountry 
"ing. [Thrower. 

How to Become a Wiiichi 
Official Sporting I 
Athletic Training for School- 
Marathon Rum 
Schoolyard Athletics. 
ATHLETIC AUXILIARIES 
No. 311 Amateur Athletic Union ( )ili- 
cial Handbook. [book. 

Intercollegiate Official I 
Y. M. C. A. Official Har;. 
1' ii hi ic Schools .A 
League Official Handbook. 
No.314 Public Schools Athletic 
League Official Handbook 
— Girls' Branch. 
Official Handbook New York 
Interscholastic Athletic 
Association. 



No. 322 

No. 248 
No. 138 

No. 271 



No. 167 
No. 170 
No. 14 
No. 207 
No. 188 
No. 189 

Group 



No. 27 
No. 182 
No. 166 
No. 87 
No. 27.5 
No. 252 
No. 255 
No. 174 

No. 259 
No. 55 
No. 246 

No. .'117 
No. 331 



No. 316 
No. 302 
No. 313 



No. 308 



Athletic 

Accomplishment! 

How to Swim. 
Speed Swimming?, 

How to Row. 

How to Become a Skater. 

How to Train for Bicycling. 

Canoeing. 

Roller Skating Guide. 

Group xiv. Manly Sporn 

No. 18 Fencing. ( By Breck.) 
Boxing. 

Fencing. ( By Sense.) 
Wrestling. 
How to Wrestle. 
Ground Tumbling. 
Jiu Jitsu. 

How to Swing Indian Clubs. 
Dumb Bell Exercises. 
Indian Clubs and Dumb Bell. 
Medicine Ball Exercises. 
Pulley Weight Exercises. 
How to Punch the Bag. 
Tumbling for Am:i b 
Professional Wrestling. 

Group XV. Gymnastic* 

No. 104 Grading" of Gymnastic Exer- 
cises. [Dumb Bell Drills 
1 Calisthenics and 
Barnjum Bar Bell Drill. 
Indoor and Outdoor Gym- 

Elastic 'lames. 
How to Become a Gymnast. 
I rumb Bell and March- 
ing- Drills. [Apparatus. 
aid Building 1 Without 
Exercises on the Parallel Bars. 

Pyramid Building 1 with 

Wand and I-adderi 

GYMNASTIC AUXILIARY 

rial Handbook I. (\ A. A. 
Gymnasts of America. 

Group XVI. Physical culture 

No. 101 Ten Minutes' E xe re i se for 

Busy Men. [giene. 

Physical Education and Hy- 

Sciantific Physical Training 1 

and Care of the Body. 
Physical Training- Simplified. 
Hints on Health. 
286 Health Answers. 
Muscle Building. [ning-. 

School Tactics and Maze Run- 
Tensing Exercises, [nasties. 
Health by Muscular Gym- 
non Treated by Gym 
Get Well: Keep Well, [nasties 
Twenty-Minute Exercises. 
Physical Training- for the 
School and Class Room. 



Group XIII. 



No. 177 
No. o ; „| 
No. 128 
No. 209 
No. 178 
No. 23 
No. 282 



No. 162 

No. 166 
No. 140 
No. 236 
No. 102 
No. 288 
No. 166 
No. 200 
No. 143 
No. 262 
No. 29 
No. 191 
No. 289 
No. 326 



No. 2! 4 
No. 264 

No. 158 

No. 124 
No. 287 

No. 327 

No. 829 



No. 208 
No. 148 

No. 1 12 
No. 186 
No. 218 
No. 288 

No. 285 

No. 325 
No. 330 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON BECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




Group I. Base Ball 

So. 1— SpaldiiiK'N OHtcial 
Base Ball Guide. 

The leading Base Ball 
annual of the country, and 
the official authority of 
the game. Contains the 
official playing rules, with 
an explanatory index of the 
rules compiled by Mr. A. G. 
Spalding; pictures of all 
the teams in the National, 
American and minor leagues ; re- 
views of the season: college Base Ball, 
»nd a great deal of interesting in- 
formation. Price 10 cents. 

No. 1A — Spalding'! Official 
Bane Ball Record. 

Something new in Base Ball. Con- 
tains records of all kinds from the be- 
ginning of the National League and 
official averages of all professional or- 
ganizations for past season. Illustrated 
with pictures of leading teams and 
players. Price 10 cents. 

No. 2(12— How «o Play Bane 
Hull. 

Edited by Tim Murnane. New and 
revised edition. Illustrated with pic- 
tures showing how all the various 
curves and drops arc thrown and por- 
traits of leading players. Price 10 cents. 

No. 22:t-How «o Bat. 

There is no better way of becoming 
» proficient batter than by reading this 
book and practising the di> 
Numerous illustrations. Price 10 cents. 

No. 2.!2-How to Bun the 
Hu*ea. 

This book gives clear and concise 
directions for excelling as a base run- 
ner: tells when to run and when not to 
do so: how and when to slide; team 
work on the bases; in fact, every point 
of the game is thoroughly explained. 
L.lustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 230— How to Pitch. 

Anew, up-to-date book. Its contents 
are the practical teaching of men who 
" Te reached the top as pitch- 
who know how to impart a knowledge 

i. I lr art ~ A11 the bi * ' 
pitchers are shown. Price 10 cents. 



No. 220— How to Cutch. 

Every boy who has hopes of being ■ 
clever catcher should read how well- 
known players cover their position. 
Pictures of all the noted catchers in 
the big leagues. Price 10 cents. 

No. 22S— How to Piny First 
Base. 

Illustrated with pictures of all the 
prominent first basemen. Price lOcents. 

No. 220— How to Play Second 
Bane. 

The ideas of the best second basemen 
have been incorporated in this book for 
the especial benefit of boys who want 
to know the fine points of play at this 
pointof thediamond. Price 10 cents. 

No. 227— How to Play Third 
Base. 

Third base is, in some respects, the 
most important of the infield. All the 
points explained. Price 10 cents. 

No. 228— HOTT to Play Short- 
stop. 

Shortstop is one of the hardest posi- 
tions on the infield to fill, and Quick 
thought and quick action are necessary 
for a player who expects to make good 
as a shortstop. Illus. Price lOcents. 

No. 224— BOfT to Play the 

limn. id. 

An invaluable guide for the out- 
fielder. Price 10 cents. 

No. 281— HOW to I'liiirli; How 
to Captain a 'ream; How 
to Manage a Team) How 
tO I inpire; How to Or- 

araiilse a Leaaroei Tech- 
nical Term* of Hawe Ball. 

A useful guide. Price 10 cents. 

No 210 — Hcaily Hcfkoner .►! 

Base Hail PereentaeTes. 

To supply a demand fora book which 

how the pen f clubs 

without recourse tothearduous work of 

figuring. the publishers had these tallies 

compiled by an cxi>ert. Price 10 cents, 

BjLSB BALL \l XII.IAHIES. 

No. ■". >l»— M I nor I. ensue Bnae 
Hall Guide. 

The minors' own guide. Edited by 
it T. H. Murnane, of the New 
England League. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 320— Official Handbook 

of the .National Loaffue 
of Professional lias*' Itall 
Club*. 

Contains the Constitution, By-Laws, 
Official Rules. Averages, and chedule 
of the Mational League for the current 
year, together with list of club officer! 
and reports of the annual meetings of 
the League. Price 10 cents. 

\o. 321— Official Handbook 
.National Playffround Hall 
Association* 

This game is specially adapted for 

playground . 

rapidly. The book contains a d< 

tion of the game, rules and list of 

officers. Price 10 cents. 



Group II. Foot Ball 



So. 2— Spaldlngr'a Ollleinl 
Fool Hull Galde. 

Edited by Walter Camp. 

n : the new rules, 

with diagram of field; All- 

AriMM-ir.t team 

revii of the a 
various of the 

lictures, 

•■ents. 




I <>>• I 



No. 884— Code <>f Hi. 

■lull l( a. 

1 1 imiiti t for the 
- to help them to refresh their 

irajck maan 
Point during a game, it also 
Jjady meam of finding 

'Jilii'ial ijui, i ,,f great help 

J? !1 pi Roles. 

Compiled by C.W. Short, Harvard, 190W. 
10 cents. 



to I'lny F 



*©. 824— Hoot 

Hall. 

mm, of Yale.' 
hing that a beginner wants to 

K,| ow and many points ' 

J™ be glad to learn. Snapshots of 
' teams and players in 




with comments 
rnce 10 cents. 



by Walter Camp. 



No. 2A— Spalding** oillcial 
taaoclatlon Soeeev Foot 
linli Ualde. 

A complete and up-to-| 
dateguido to the 'Soccer"! 
in the United States, 1 
cnntaininginstructionsforl 
playing tlie game, official I 
rules, ami interesting! 
news from all parts of the I 
country. Illustrated. Price| 
10 cents. 

No. 280— Hoot to Play SOO- 
CCr. 

How each position should be played, 
written by the bei t player in Kngland 
in his respective position, and illus- 
trated with full-page photographs of 
players in action. Price 10 cents. 

FOOT II \l.l, A I Ml, I A It IKS. 

No. 382— Spalding's Ofllolal 
Canadian Foot llall 
Galde, 

official book of the game in Can- 
ada. Price 10 

No. 338— Spalding's Official 
ituui>> Pool nail Galde. 

Ida) rules under 

played to Kngland 

and by the California schools and col- 

for playing 

as on a team. Illus- 

. tion pictures Of leading 

Price 10 cents. 

Group III. Cricket 

Xo. 8— Spnldlunr'a Ofllolal 
Crick el c;niil«-. 

The most complete year 

toe that has 

ever been published in 

Reports of 

matches, ollicial 

rules and pictures of all 

ling teams. Price 

\o. U77— < 'rieki'li nnd How 
lo I'luj it. 

By Prince Kanjitsinhji. The game 
d concisely and illustrated with 
. specially for 
this Ux>k. Price 10 cenu. 




SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Group IV. 



Lawn 
Tennis 




No. I— H|>:i1<!inKT*N Official 

Lawn Tennta Annual. 

reports 
I of alt important tourna- 
oflirial making 
388 bO <iatr; I 
I lawn tennis; instruction 
! for handicapping; deci- 
sions on doubtful points: 
management of braroa- 
I ments; directory of clubs: 
laying- out and keeping a court. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 



\,,. 1.-7— Hovr to Vlny Unn 

I II.MIN. 

A complete description of lawn t'-n- 

for btiffbuien ax* 

tiona telling how to make the most im- 
portant strokes. Illustrated. Prica 
10 cents. 



\o. 27!»-S|rolt('» anil SeiCBCC 
«»f I. a i\ n Tea aln. 

ling; authority 

stroke ■ -!y illus- 

and analyzed by the author. 
Price 10 cents. 



Group V. Golf 

No. .-._ SpiiMiiiu* <lllli-lnl 

<.„n «.„,. i... 
Contain! records of all 
articles on the v. 

••f tho 

country, pic 

; iayers. official j>lay- 
iritc rules and .- 
of interest, 
nta. 



Group VI. Hockey 

No. O— S|i:ildiiiK-» Ofliriiil Ice 



II.,,- 





COJ i.uiil,-. 

The official yearbook of 
the khiii,-. Contains the 
official rules, j. iciures of 
and players, 
records, review of the 
season, reports from dif" 
f'T'-nt sections of the 
Hni ted States and Canada. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. :iiil-llmv to Piny Ice 
Hockey. 

Contains a description of the duties 
of eacli player. Illustrated. Price 10 
cents. 

No. j.-,i— Fieiii Booker- 
Prominent in the sports at Vassar, 
ley, Hryn Itawr and other 

leading colleges. Price 10 cents. 

n<>. i s s _ i, n w n Hooker, 

I'nrlor HocUc), l.iirileii 

Hockey. 

Containing the rules for each game. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

\,,. |si,_Hi„ K Ho. 1 

A new game for the gymnasium. 
Kxcitingas basket ball. Price 10 cents. 

HOI Ivl \ \l Mil \ll V. 

No. Hm OHlWlol llmi.ll.,"' 1 * 
€)f Hie (Inlarlo B00k07 
A lOflOlof ItflMi 

Contains the official I 
Association, constitution, rule* of coin- 
. list of officers, and pictures oi 
layers. Price 10 cents. 



Basket 
Ball 



NO. ^7'e-||,,» |„ PIU> I-Olf. 

I :>:..! liar:;. 

>m van 
ous full-pa;. m taken en 

n ti,« links. Price 10 cents. , .-ntsi 



Group VU. 

No. 7— Mmlilinu » Olll'l" 1 
Itn.L.-C Hull i.oidc. 
iTS T. 
rTepbroo. ' 

revised official rules, de- 
cisions > 

. 




SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



*«. 108— Ham to I'lny llnake< 
"nil. 

)m y - . G A T : Hepbron. editor of the 
J "cial Basket Ball Guide. II). 
1C " scenes of action. Price 10 cents. 

*°- 818— Offlelal Basket Ball 
t-ul.le f„ r Women. 

ai^Jj 1 ' Henda Berenson, of 

ou». Col&Be. Containa the 

the ' r "''" i an '' "I"''!-'' ••"" 
n„„f a,n '' by prominent auth. 
"lustrated. Price 10 cents. 

B **K&S IIM.l. |l Mil Mtl. 

°'„ :t - :{ — <<>1I<-Kiii(.- Ilnnkt'l 
Mnll ll„ ln ||„,.k. 

m»?l P ','""''•'' PnbHc«tion of the Colic- 
taint S" 1 "* Ball m. Con- 
Ameri """'• ,1 ri11 " • r nls. All- 
ium.. '• • reviews, and pic- 
Colun'i '"' ,,y H - A - Fisher, of 
«wnnbta. Price io cents. 



Group X. 

No. 10— Spaldlnar'ai 
mii.ioi Roller 

Polo (iiiifle. 

I-Miicl by 3. C. Morse. 

A full ■!.■ iriplion of the 

I rules, re- 

. i vers. Price 1' 



Polo 



roller Polo 



fc~s^ 




Group VIII. Bowling 

'„ K — ■PaMtnar'a Official 

»U«i (.ni.i... 

11 atenta Include: 

nan' how to 

are mad.-: rul 

,l;i '. qui n t et, cool 

«n. I feather, battle game, 

liii-enta. 



G roup IX I> ndoor 
v upiA - Base Ball 

,|,~ "; ,I( ""K'» Official In- 

l, »*S" i ' n ! l|F '' 

p»«„ ne ram ^ 1 «" » winter 
**'"« the i P* 
»**«ra. , f V 

»nd i,.. '" 

Pr "-" S cenj ' 



No. 120— Water Polo. 

The eontaata of this book treat of 

,.,ail. the individual work of the 

■:,!. how 

throw the ball, with illu.trat.onsand 
,„a„ y valuable hints. Price 10 cents. 

\o. 100— Ban****** 11 , ' ol °- 

lad by H. U P«toPotriekoi ^a 
ri, Sun. Ilustrated with p»r- 
Me.di.UTPl :"tons 

,,on for polo play- 
ers. Price 10 cents. 




Miscellane- 
GroupXI. ous Games 

No UHI — I.ihto-.-"-. 

Kver, !• ", l " r ""f l ' ly M H'; 

I; nual 

!. lllUS- 
ofin,- 

i nta. 

oroaae i''"-'"'' 
a eoctatlon, i w 

No. •J7l->poT 1 liML:'« Official 
I,,,,,,,,. <.ui<l.-. 

\,f America." 

, diagrams. i"us- 
JaWSe .nforma- 

. rents. 



SIP AIDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 138— Spalding's Official 
Croquet Guide 

Contains directions for playing; dia- 
grams of important strokes, description 
of grounds, instructions for the begin- 
ner, terms used in the name, and the 
official playing rules. Price 10 cents. 

No. 2 IS— Archery. 

A new and up-to-date book on this 
fascinating pastime. The several 
varieties of archery; instructions for 
shooting*; how to select implements; 
how to score; and a great deal of inter- 
esting- information. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 104— Racquets, Sqnash- 
Kurquets and Court Ten- 
nis. 

How to play each frame is thoroughly 
explained, and all the difficult strokes 
shown by special photographs taken 
especially for this book. Contains the 
official rules for each game. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 167— Quoits. 

Contains a n of the plays 

used by experts ami the official rules. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

.No. 170— Push Dall. 

This book contains the official rules 
and a sketch of the game; illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. Ki— How to Flay Hand 
Ball. 

By the worP's champion, Michael 
f play is thoroughly ex- 
d by text and diagram. IIIuk- 
Prfc 10 cents. 

No. 1 1— i tirlinir. 

A short history of this famous Scot - 
• a for 

ent shots. 



tish pastime, with 
play, rules of the gam* 
terms and diagrams of 
Price 10 cents. 



\o. 207— Bowline on the 

<.r«-«-n; or, I.nun lloivli. 

how to 
play th. Eml rules 

of the . 
Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 




Ro. ISO— Children's Games. 

These games are intended for use at 
recesses, and all but the team games 
have been adapted to large classep. 
Suitable for children from three tc 
eight years, and include a great variety. 
Price lu cents. 

Xo. INS — l,mv n Games. 

Lawn Hockey, Garden Hockey, Hand 
Tennis, Tether Tennis; also Volley 
Ball, Parlor Hockey* P.admin ton, Bas- 
ket Goal. Price 10 cents. 



Group XII. Athletics 

Xo. 12— SpnliliiiK'" Official 
Athletic Aliiiiuiuc. 

Compiled by 3. K. Kulli- I 
van, Pn e Ama- 

teur Athletic Union. Tho | 
only annua! puhli 

hat contains | 
a complete list of at 

] 
lefriate, swimming. int'*r- 
scholastic. English. Irish. Scotch, 
Swedish, Continental, South African, 
pbotOfl of in- 
dividual atlil- ■ iding athletic 
teams. Price 10 cents. 

\<>. 87— CoUefa Athletic 

M. C. Murphy, the well-known ath- 

luer. now ■. .vania, 

tfaOT of this l>ook. has written it 

cboolboy aii'i i 
man, but it is invaluable (■ - 
who wishes to excel in any branch of 
lusely illustrated. 
Price 10 i 

\<>. is;- Ml- Around Atll- 

lotic.N. 

Gives in full the matbod of scorine 
the All- Around Chat how to 

train for the Alio n|.ioti- 

ship. Illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

\.,. ir,i;_ \thl.-ti- -h f.ul.lr. 

..tractions for tho beninner. 
telling how tospnn' 

throw v. , train- 

■.. ir !■»■ 
uipriso 
many scenes of champions in action 
Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 273— The Olympic <;iim«-» 

lit Athens. 
A complete account of the Olympic 
of 1906, at Athens, the B 
International Athletic Contest ever 
held. Compiled by J. E. Sullivan, 
' United State* Commissioner to 
the Olympic Games. 1'rice 10 cents. 

No. 87— Athletic Primer. 

Edited by J. !■:. Sullivan. Kx-I'i 
of the Amateur A'. n. Telia 

how to organize an athli 

dnct an athl tag, and 

gives rules for the government of ath- 
letic meetmfl also include 
directions for laying out athletic 
grounds, and B very instructive article 
on training. Price 10 cents. 

N... 252— HoiT tr> Sprint. 

to be a 
booh io advan- 
tage. Price 1" cents. 

Ho. 285— II. nv l.> Hun 100 
^ arda. 

By J. W. Mo-ion. the note.1 
on. Many of Mr. U 
. of training are novel to 
bat his su< 
ti.eir worth. Illus- 
Price 10 cents. 

Ho, 174— Distance avnd ('ro»- 

< "mil i •> It niiiilnu. 

targe Orion, the famous Uni- 
of Pennsylvania runner. The 
r. half, mile, the longer dl 

running and 
'■nasing. with in 
raini, lir; pictures of leading athletes 

1 ' 10 . ants. 

N ". 280— Weight IhroMillK 

and long ex i 

ir. in the 
ins depai 

- il.f.T- 

mation not only foi hut for 

"ie expert as well. Price 10 cents 

s <>. MS— Athletic Trnii.inu 
'"■• ■ehoolhorc. 

inu'.V" 
ercouegj . 

DI "eparately. !•,„. 



No. 55— OfflClaJ Sporting 
It ii leu. 

Contains rules not found in other 
publications for the government of 
many sports; rules for wrestling, 
shuffleboard. enowshoeing. . profes- 
sional racing, pigeon shooting, dog 
racing revolver shooting. 

British water polo rules, Rugby foot 
ball rules. Price 10 cents. 



ATHLETIC Al Ml ' *" li:s - 
\„. 811— Official Handbook 

of the a.a.i. 

The A. A. U. is the governing body 
of athletes in the United Mates of 
America, ami all games must be heW 
under its rules, which are exclusively 
published in this handbook, and a copy 
should he in the hands of every athlete 
and every club officer in America. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 816— Official Inl.r.olle- 
giate A.\.\. * Handbook. 

.ostitution l.y-laws. and 
, ,ords from 187b to 
date. Price 10 cents. 

No. 808— OfflclaJ Haadl >- 

N,.„ k-orb Interscbol- 
„„,,,. athletic laaocla- 

llon. 

constitution and by-laws and other 
ration. Price 10 centa. 

n... 802— Offlcial WtRA. 

I In n.ll st. 

"7'tZ 

HI cents. 

N „ B13 -Offlolal ii..»'ii.»»u 
.1 Pabllc «..•""»<• 

M lie I'-nu".-- 

i'ii,.,i hv it c Ward Crempton, 
.10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 314— Offirinl Handbook 
Girlx' Branch of the 
. Public School* Athletic 
I.euuue. 

Vh* official publication. Contains 
constitution anil by-laws, list of ofli 
cars, donors, founders, life and annual 
members, reports and illustrations. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 331— Schoolyard Ath- 
letics. 

By J. E. Sullivan. Kx-President Ama- 
teur Athletic Union and member of 
Board of Education of Greater New 
York. An invaluable handbook for 
the teacher and the pupil. Gives a 
systematic plan i.ir conducting: school 
athletic contests and instructs how to 
prepare for the various events. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cents. 



Ko> 817— Marathon Banning;. 

A new and up-to-date book on this 
popular pastime. Contains pictures 
of the leading; Marathon runners, 
methods of training:, and best times 
made in various Marathon events. 
Price 10 cents. 



Group XIII. Athletic 
Accomplishments 

No. 177— How to Swim. 

Will interest the expert as well as 
the novice; the illustrations were made 
from photographs especially 
showing; the swimmer in clear water; 
a valuable feature is the series of 
landdrill " exercises for the beginner. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 2J>«— Speed Swimming-. 

By Champion C. M. Daniels of the 
New York Athletic Club team, holder 
of numerous Amei let 
beatswimmcr in America oualil 

'. Any Ix.v 
be able to increase his speed 
water after reading 

Instructions on the subject. Price In 
cents. 



No. 128— How to Row. 

By E. J. Giannini, of the New York 
Athl.tic Club, one of America's most 
famous amateur oarsmen and cham- 
pions. Shows how to hold the oars, 
the finish of the stroke and other valu- 
able information. Price 10 cents. 

No. 23— Canoeing;. 

Paddling-, sailing-, cruising- and rac- 
ing; canoes and their uses; with hints 
on rig and management; the choice of 
a^ canoe; sailing canoes, racing regula- 
tions; canoeing and camping. Fully 
illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 209— How to Become a 
Skater. 

Contains advice for beginners; how 
to become a figure skater, showing how 
to do all the different tricks of the best 
figure skaters. Pictures of prominent 
skatersandnumerousdiagrams. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 282— Official Holler Skat- 
ing; Guide. 

Directions for becoming a fancy and 
trick roller skater, and rules for roller 
skating. Pictures of prominent trick 
skaters in action. Price 10 cents. 

No. 178— How to Train for 

Itic-ycliiiK. 

Gives methods of the best riders 
when training forlongorshortdistance 
races: hints on training. Revised and 
up-to-date in every particular. Price 
10 cents. 



Group XIV. 



Manly 
Sports 



So. I l(»— WrextliiiK. 

Catch-as-catch-can style. Seventy 
il lustra different holds, pho- 

tographed especially and so described 
that anybody can with little effort learn 
everyone. Price 10 cents. 

\o. [8— I eniiiiK. 

By In-. Edward Itreck. of Boston. 
editor of The Swordsman, a promi- 
ateur fencer. A book that has 
stood the test of lime, and is universally 
acknowledged to be a Btandard work. 
Illustrated. Price lOcents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 162— Boxing Guide. 

Contains over 70 pagesof illustrations 
showing: all the latest blows, posed 
especially for th is book under the super- 
vision of a well-known instructor of 
boxing, who makes a specialty of teach- 
ing and knows how to impart his 
knowledge. Price 10 cents. 

No. 165— The Art of Fencing 

By Regis and Louis Senac, of New 
York, famous instructors and leading 
authorities on the subject. Gives in 
detail how every move should be made. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 236— How to Wrestle. 

The most complete and up-to-date 
book on wrestling ever published. 
Edited by F. K. Toombs, and devoted 
principally to special poses and illustra- 
tions by George Hackenschmidt, the 

Russian Lion." Price 10 cents. 



No. lOS— Ground Tumbling. 

Any boy, by reading this book and 
following the instructions, can become 
proficient. Price 1 cents. 



No. 2MO— Tumbling for Ama- 
teur*. 

Specially compiled for amateurs by 
Dr. James T. Gwathmey. Every variety 
of the pastime explained by text and 
pictures, over 100 different positions 
being shown. Price 10 cents. 



Wo. i91— How to Punch tbe 
Bag. 

The best treatise on bag punching 
that has ever been printed. Every va- 
riety of blow used in training is shown 
and explained, with a chapter on fancy 
bag punching by a weli-known theatri- 
cal bag puncher. Price 10 cents. 

No. 200— Dumb-Belle. 

The best work on dumb-bells that 
has ever been offered. By Prof. (J. 
Bojus, of New York. Contain*, 200 
photographs. Should be in the hands 
of every teacher and pupil of physical 
culture, and is invaluable for home 
exercise. Price 10 cents. 



No. 1-13— Indian Clubs and 
Dumb-BelU. 

By America's amateur champion club 
swinger, J. H. Dougherty. It is clearly 
illustrated, by which any novice can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

No. 262— Medicine Ball Ex- 
ercise*. 

A series of plain and practical exer- 
cises with the medicine ball, suitable 
for boys and girls, business and profes- 
sional men, in and out of gymnasium* 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 29— Pulley Weight Exer- 
cises. 

By Dr. Henry S. Anderson, instructor 
in heavy gymnastics Yale gymnasium. 
In conjunction with a chest machine 
anyone with this book can become 
perfectly developed. Price 10 cents. 

No. 233— JIu Jitsn. 

Each move thoroughly explained and 
illustrated with numerous full-page 
pictures of Messrs. A. Minami and K. 
Koyama, two of the most famous ex- 
ponents of the art of Jiu Jitsu. who 
posed especially for this book. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 166— How to Swing; In* 
dinn Clubs. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. By follow- 
ing the directions carefully anyone can 
become an expert. Price 10 cents. 

No. 326— Professional Wrest- 
ling. 

A book devoted to the catch-as-catch- 
can style; illustrated with half-tone 
pictures showing the different holds 
used by Frank Gotch, champion catch- 
as-catch-can wrestler of the world. 
Posed by Dr. Holler and Charles Post). 
By Ed. W. Smith, Sporting Editor of 
the Chicago American. Price 10 cents. 

Group XV. Gymnastics 

No. 104— The Grading; of 

GrmnMtic Eierci««. 
By G. M. Martin. A book that should 
be in the hands of every physical direc- 
tor of the Y. M. C. A., school, club, col- 
lege. etc. Price 10 cents. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Ho. 214— Graded Callsthen- 
lca and Dumb-Bell Drill*. 

For years it has been the custom in 
most gymnasiums of memorizing a set 
drill, which was never varied. Conse- 
quently the beginner was given the 
same kind and amount as the older 
member. sWith a view to giving uni- 
formity the present treatise is at- 
tempted. Price 10 cents. 

No. 2.".»— Ilnrnjum Bar Bell 
Drill. 

Edited by Dr. R. Talt McKenzie, 
Director Physical Training, University 
of Pennsylvania. Profusely illustrated. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 158 — Indoor and Outdoor 
Gymnastic Games. 

A book that will prove valuable to in- 
door and outdoor gymnasiums, schools, 
outings and gatherings where there 
are a number to be amused. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 124 — How to Become a 
Gymnast. 

By Robert Stoll, of the New York 
A. C. the American champion on the 
flying rings from 1885 to 1892. Any boy 
can easily become proficient with a 
little practice. Price 10 cents. 

No. 287— Fancy Dumb Bell 
and Marching Drills. 

All concede that games and recreative 
exercises during the adolescent period 
are preferable to set drilU and monoton- 
ous movements. These drills, while de- 
signed primarily for boys, can bo used 
successfully with girls and men and 
women. Profusely illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 327— r> rum 1,1 BuIIiIIiik 
Without ApnnnitiiH. 

By W. J. Cromie. Instructor of 
Lrymnastics. University of Pennsyl- 
vania. With illustrations showing 
many different combinations. This 
book should be in the hands of all gym- 
nasium instructors. Price 10 Cents. 



on the 



No. ffisfl Iftniiul.M 
Parallel Hnrx. 

.^.Tii^ 3 - Cromie - Ev «rr gymnast 
should procure a cony of this book. 

novel exercises. Price 10 cents. 



No. ::_!•— Pyramid Bulldtns; 
vt-ith Chairs, Wanda and 

I .miller.*. 

By W. J. Cromie. Illustrated with 
half-tone photopraphB showing many 
interesting combinations. Price 10 
cents. 

GYMNASTIC AUXILIARY. 

No. 33S— Official Handbook 
Inter-ColleKinte Associa- 
tion Amateur Gymnasts 
of America. 

Edited by P. R. Carpenter, Physical 
Director Amherst College. Contains 
pictures of leading teams and ind ividual 
champions, official rules governing con- 
tests, records. Price 10 cents. 



_ _____ Physical 

Group XVI. culture 

No. 1C1— Ten Minutes' Exer- 
cise for Busy Men. 

By Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick, Direc- 
tor of Physical Training in the New 
York Public Schools. A concise and 
complete course of physical education. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 208— Physical Education 
and Hygiene. 

This is the fifth of th* Physical 
Training series, by Prof. E. B. Warman 
(M6 Noh. 142, 149. lit. 186. 213, 261. 290.) 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 149— The Careof th* Body. 

A book that all who value health 
should read and follow its instructions. 
By Prof. E. B. Warman, the well-known 
lecturer and authority on physical cul- 
ture. Price 10 cents. 



No. 142— Physical Train!-. 
Simplified. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. A complete, 
thorough and practical book whare the 
whole man is considered — brain and 
I body. Price 10 cents. 



^■■^^■l^HBB^H 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. 185— Health Hints. 

By Prof . E. B. Warman. Health In- 
fluenced by Insulation: health influ- 
enced by underwear; health influenced 
by color; exercise. Price 10 cents. 



No. 21.1— 283 Henlth Auwen, 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. Contents: 
ventilating* a bedroom; ventilating- a 
house; how to obtain pure air; bathing; 
salt water baths at home; a substitute 
for ice water; to cure insomnia, etc., 
etc Price 10 cents. 



No. 238— Muscle Building-. 

By Dr. L. H. Gulick. A complete 
treatise on the correct method of 
acquiring strength. Illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 



No. 234— School isclln and 
Haxe Running". 

A series of drills for the use of schools. 
Edited by Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick. 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 261— Tensing- Exercises. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. The "Ten- 
aing" or "Resisting" system of mus- 
cular exercises is the most thorough, 
the most complete, the most satisfac- 
tory, and the most fascinating of sys- 
Price 10 cents. 



No. 2MB— Health! by Musea- 
lar Gymnastics. 

With hints on right living. By W.J. 
Cromie. If one will practice the exer- 
cises and observe the hints therein 
contained, he will be amply repaid foi 
so doing*. Price 10 cents. 

No. 288— Indla-extlon Treated 
by <«> in nasties 

By W. J. Cromie. If the hints there- 
in contained are observed and the 
exercises faithfully performed great 
relief will be experienced. Price 10 
cents. 

No. 200— Get Well- Keep 
Well. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman, author of a 
number of books in the Spalding Ath- 
letic Library on physical training. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. m i l T lllillij Mlnnte Ex- 

«'reiN«'N. 

By Proi . E. B. Warman, with chap- 
ters on " How to Avoid Growing Old,*" 
and "Fasting; Its Objects and Bene- 
fits." Price 10 cents. 

Ho. :i:t(t— 1'hynlcnl Training 
for the School and Class 
llooni. 

Edited by G. R. Borden. Physical 
Director of the Y. M. C. A., Easton. Pa. 
A book that la for practical work In 
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No. 1— Spalding' s Official Base Ball Guide. 

No. 1 A— Spalding's Official Base Ball Record. 

No. 223— How to Bat. 

No. 230— How to Pitch. 

No. 229— How to CatJi. 

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No. 226 — How to /'lay Second Base. 

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No. 224— How to Play the Outfield. 

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CONSTITUTION AND 
PLAYING RULES 



OF THE 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



OK 



PROFESSIONAL 
BASE BALL CLUBS 

1910 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 






NEW YORK 

American Sports Publishing Company 
21 warren street 



CorruoBT, 191& 
■r 

Amikican si-ukts Publishing CohfaBY 

Mw Yo»i 



3 



Constitution of the National League 

of Professional Base Ball Clubs 

1910 



Adopted February 2, 1876. 



Name. 



the 



SECTION 1. This Association shall be called 
National League of Professional Base Ball Uuds. 

Objects. 
SEC. 2. The objects of this League are: 
_ i. To immortalize Base Ball as the national game ot tne 
United States. , . „.„-„* 

2. To surround il with such safeguards as to«nw 
lute public confidence in its integrity and m « no ° f s - 
, 3. To protect and promote the mutual interests of pro 
Ball clubs and professional Base Ball players, 
and R |l 

4- To establish and regulate the professional Base Ban 
championship of this League. 

Membership. 
SEC. 3. This League shall consist of eight dd* <* h " 
membership shall not be increased or dimmish cd e xcepi 
by unanimous consent of the League), located in ™ a ™& 
ting the following mte Boston. Ncv. yor. 

'"■"-A-lyn, I'hil.-.delph.a. Pittsburg, < incinnati, St JLOTO 
;, ,"'l Chicago, and in DO event shall there be more than one 



club 



'» any city. 



Withdrawal from Membership. 
„ S EC. 4. A„v dub member of the League unable to meet 
,h " obligations it has assumed may ask the League for per 
"'-"•» '" dispose of its rights and franchises ,a^ ^ « 
P. 1 the Leaeue n that rtv to some other corpor 



„/ , UJ uispose o is rigins .niu " ,.;,,„ in 

'/ *e League in that city to some other »rporatHM^w 
';." -vent of tins League giving its consent to t hi u*n«£ 
" membership fro,,, one company to another it t u 

""'-•■■stood that the new member shall assume ^ 
,r: «nchisi i ,;..,.. . .,... —fif-ins mnipanv an 






bilities, responsibilities and obligations entered into by 
the retiring company. It must auo be understood by the 
retiring and new company that the company retiring shall 
not be relieved or released from any contract or obligation 
entered into by it to this League until all of jaid contracts 
and obligations have been fully paid and determined by the 
company accepting its membership, rights and franchises. 

Admission to Membership. 

SEC. 5. a company to be admitted to membership in 

tin- League most tir-t deliver to thi ry of the 

League a written application signed b ideiit and 

Secretary, accompanied by documents showing that such 
company is regularly organized, charter) i. and 

is prepared to fully comply with tin- pn 
of this Constitution. Such application shall at 01 
transmitted by the Secretary to the I'.oard of Dir< 
who shall immediately investigate and report upon said 

application, said report to be communicatee to the League 
through the Secretary. 

SEC. 6. The voting upon an application for membership 
shall be by ballot, a three-fourths vote being requisit 
election. 

In Regard to Vacancies. 

SEC. 7. Li . - s m ti,,. membership of 

(nil organization during the championship season, the i 
dent ihall nominate t" all the clubs all applii I mem- 

bership; and the vi taken by telegraph 

or mail. :i and a majority <<( all the 

will be required to admit any applicant to member 
ship Such membership, how< I continue only until 

the nexl annual meeting, hut such club shall be sul" 
all the rules and rcquin n 

Termination of Membership. 
SEC. 8. ' ip of air. . In). 

i By resignation duly ace 
of all clubs in meeting duly convened as provided in Sec- 
tion 4 

2. Ry failur- nt its nine at the time and 

championship game, unit 
by ui • in traveling. 

grounds or in any build; ! or occupied by it. 



dis- 



4- By playing any ?ame of tall with ■ dob that is 
qualified or ineligible under this ppM^SSnnfc* to lose 

5- By offering, agreeng, conspiring or attempting ; « ■ 
any game of bill: or failure to "«" lc t L e & 
Playe? who shaU be proven guilty of offei . g. < g reeing. 
conspiring or attempting to lose any game of ban, o 
being interested in any pool or wager thereon. 

6. By disbandment of its organization or club 
during the championship season. ™ n tractual obli- 

7. By failing or refusing to K.lt.U its contractual o 

Ons. . . t„„,f,,l re- 

8. By failing or refusing to comply with any Iawtui 
quirement of the Board of Directors. ronstitu- 

» By wilfully violating any provision of ttus ^"^ 
ton. or the legislation or playing rues made P~ n al 
'hereof, or any violation of the provisions of the JNai.o 
Agreement 

The Expulsion of Clubs. • o 

SEC. 9. To carry into effect the provisions of b ec ion 
"• this Constitution; the facts in any ease covered by si.cn 
on must be reported to the Secretary •' tlK . ; * rlv 
who .hall at once Tnotify by mail or *£^JFJE& 
charged with the specified default or offense, and m ^ 
whether any dispute exists as to the facts aUegeo. ' tice 
"•<-• facts are disputed, the Board shall ■*»«££*£ 
try the case unde? sudi regulations u th» «0 J^gtiei 
; ""l its finding shall be final and conclusive™ au 
except in ease of expulsion, when such find "K **"c > 

h club, Which shall transmit to t he . _ , 
written ballots "For Expulsion" or "Against Exp f'«, 
: ""1 if seven clubs vote "For Expulsion" the Seewttg) «» 
notify all clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the pa . 
charged. 

Dues and Assessments. 
, SEC. 10. , Each club shall pay to the ^ S»*w, «or 
'" fore the first day of April of each year, g*£^ f g C g£ 
M an,,,,.-,] due.; and such other sums as fron »«»"" .„„, 
may be assessed for the payment ol salaries oJcflOT <d 
'"'•1'ires, and for such Other expenses as may W 

';> order of this League, thetfoard of g~Sd by •* 



ance with, the provisions of this Constitution and the 
Playing Rules of this League. 

2. Upon conviction of any of the offenses prescribed in 
Section 8 as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors 
may, in the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lieu 
of expulsion, impose such a line as is in its judgment 
commensurate with the injury' ; which fine may include 
a penalty payable to any other club or clubs as an equiva- 
lent for damages sustained for such violation of this 
Constitution, or of the legislation or contracts mad<- in 
pursuance thereof. 



Officers. 
SEC. 11. The officers of the League shall be a President 
and Secretary-Treasurer and five members of the Board of 
Directors. They shall be elected at the Annual Meeting. 
It shall require five votes of the League to elect any officer 
and .all officers shall serve until their successors are elected 
and qualified, excepting as otherwise providea in this sec- 
tion. The /'resident shall be ex-oMcio Chairman of the 
tors, lie shall report to the Hoard of I >irec 
tors any violation of the provisions of the Constitution that 
may come to his knowledge. He shall he the sole into 
of the Playing Rules, lie shall preside at all meetings of 
the League. 'I he /'resident or Secrctarv-Treo 
be removed for cause by a four-fifths vote of the B 
of Directors, concurred in by at least six voles of the 
1. ear/ue. Should the office of the /'resident or Secretary- 
Treasurer become vacant by death, resignation or removal 
the Hoard of Directors shall within thirty days thereafter 
elect the successor thereto, who shall serve until the next 
Annual Meeting of the League. 

The Secretary's Duties. 

SEC. 12. The Secretary shall be the Treasurer of the 
League, and as such thai] be the custodian of all fundi of 
the Leagui all dues, fees and 

shall be placed to the credit of the Treasurer in 
bank of deposit u> meet current expeo 
such paynu I irdered bj ident the 

Board or by the vote of the r annually 

a detailed report of his and he shall 

bond, with approval sui the Hoard may require 

SEC. 13. 1 he Secretary -liall have the custody and care 



of the official records and papers of the League : sha 1! keep 
a true stenographic record of all meetings of »« "2ES 

and the Hoard; shall issue all officia notices, an : | R 
to the necessary correspondence; he shall also P"* 8 ""? 
furnish such reports as may be called for by tic I.oa , 
and shall be entitled to such books, stationery, blanks ana 
materials as the actual duties of his office n,a >, r T',, in . 

SEC. 14. The Secretary shall keep a record of . ill i 
tractions of the rales and regulations of the L«aguc 
may come under his notice, and shall make a report on 
same to the Hoard at its next meeting. receive 

SEC. 15. The President and Secretary shal I r eceiv 
such salaries as the Board by vote shall deter.. int. a 
shall be reimbursed for all traveling «P?n s « a u ' f the 
furred bj them in the service of the U-agm y."'\. l ; 
Board may exact from them such guarantee for ti a. 
ful performance of their dun,- as they woulddeemior 
the interest and safety of the League. Al the ««"£££ 
their terms of office they shall account for. and deh u u 
to the Board, all the propertj and pape«whtch may 
into their hands by virtue of their oftces. 

SEC. 16. The Board of Directors shall eo, of tne 

and five other members, to be chosen at tne 

annual meeting by ballot. „ , . _.,...,.,„, ,,f 

SEC. 17. [ n caw of vacancy in the Board by rtW ,no 
the death, resignation or absence ol any Director, '"^sen, 
of which he was a member, al the time be *™ s£cre- 

»hall designate his successor and al once no | > J. hl ^ , f 
tary. But if such vacancy is caused bv tlu w 
disbanding or disqualification of a club rWgeJ on t 
ard may fill the vacancy b> elect on , i 
manner as provided for the election of Directors 
* ii. 

Qualification of Directors. 
SEC. 18. Xo person shall be qualified to act «•£"«« 
who is no, an actual member of the dub » J^ESted 
i„l, u ,„|,. r a ny circumstances, '' ' ' , . nor 
by more than one person on the Board oi u r<.u _ 
shall any Director $1 ... the trial of a cause ,., wnicn 
dub is interested ,,„ nn *he second 

. S EC. 19. The Board shall meet anuaHy on the .^ 

day in December, ... 12 o'clock noon, " < ,- mav 
<l'e annual meeting of the League IS to hi nel . of 

hold special n the call of tne 



8 

two members of the Board, whenever necessity may- 
require. 

SEC. 20. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of 
all its doings, and present the same in writing to the 
League at it> annual meeting; which report shall, if ac- 
cepted, be filed with the Secretary, together with all official 
papers, documents and property which may have come into 
its possession by virtue of its office. 

SEC. 21. The Board shall have a general supervision 
and management of all the affairs, and business of the 
League, including the award of the championship and such 
other duties expressedly or impliedly conferred upon it 
by this Constitution, or by legislation made in pursuance 
thereof. It shall be the sole and exclusive tribunal for 
the trial of managers or players for any violation of this 
Constitution or of the playing rules or other rule- , 
cipline, unless the League by a three fourths vote of its 
club membership, shall otherwise direct. It shall be tin- 
sole and exclusive tribunal to hear and determine disputes 
between clubs, complaints by a club against the manager 
or player of another club, or by a manager or player against 
his own club, or an appeal by a player against fine, suspen- 
sion or expulsion by his own dub, or complaint by the 
lent of the League against a club for failure to com- 
ply with Constitution requirements, and general! 
adjudication of all issues of law or farts arising out of this 
Constitution, the Playing Rules and other legislation made 
in pursuance thereof. 

SEC. 22. The Board shall adopt such regulations and 
such rules of proce. ure for the hearing* rmination 

of all disputes, and complaints brought before it. V 
such dispute.is in relation to a gai d to hav< 

played in violation of thi tution or of the Playing 

Rules, the complaint and accompanying proofs must be 
filed within five days after the date game with 

the President of the Hoard, who shall send of the 

same to the other clul rders to file its answer within 

five days thereafter. The President of the Board shall in 

the first instance decide the dispute on its merits and forth- 
with communicate his decision to both cl I of which 
may within live days appeal from said to the full 
Board. Said decision, together with all other documents and 
. -ball thereupon be transmitted for a mail vote to the 
different members of the Board. The finding of I 
shall be final, and under no circumstances shall 






9 

ed, reopened or inquired into, either by the League or 
any subsequent Board. 

SEC. 23. |]„. Board shall al on n id* 

plaim a club against a ma | I "'>' ' 

anothei club (prior to th. expiration oi the championship 
.nduci in violation i ovision ot tnis 

in> , ir prejudicial to the good ll 'i ,l,,r ",' , ,T ,, 
of base ball and shall have power to requin '• l « 

which such player or manager may belong, to discipline 
him, and upon rep. ! M ; ™' 

Provided, that such complaint be preferred in w 

! Buch particulars a able the I ' ; l 

tain all the facts, and such particulars shall be transmitted 
to th, v. by whom 11 -hall at once be re tern 1 

the Bo all cases where charg, ' ;'.''> 

any regularly appointed League umpire against any •' 

iolation c/the Playing Rules oi f™, 

ball field prejudicial to the goo, < the game of base 

the President shall has- !? n * , * ct SS < S Mb 

md inflict penalties, if any, suDjeci ■ 
to the restriction that in no case where expu taw , « ^ 
shall same be put into effect until ratifi. 
I lire, • 

SEC - 24 " I' ,W 'unulur'm 

. during a cuVrent ' tTsndi a 

dub, alleging that such club is in arrears to him io 
ary for more than fiftee. ' 5alar l a ,i tf once 

tract, the Secretary snai . 

transmit to the said club h l '"",' 1 ' 1 : :; ' 

an answei .. 'J^er. 

ays shall •'',.: m e ■' ; the 

'" Secretary shall refer the pai j yer > s 

andshoul ;o f d i"h under pen- 

complaint l. it shall require the club, una* i 

alty , I:; ,. , lf it,' membership, b ,'. ' j,,,,. 

■ • h pend- 

fll thereby 
omplaint, he win ^ , 

forfeit .1 of the award, and in sucn 

!l revoke ! ,,..,, , 00 eaJ 

, S£ C. 25. The Board shall promptly hear n ap p 
'"•"I;- by any person who shall have been «P el '| a e • u 

' 'ha Iwihin 
,,.,„ 3& Such person shall, wit 



10 

thirty days after the date of the expulsion, suspension or 
discipline, file with the Secretary a written statement of his 
e, accompanied by a request that an appeal he 
allowed him. The Secretary shall notify the cluh of the 
request for an appeal, accompanying such notice with a 
of the appeal; and at the next meeting of the Hoard 
the club, by its duly authorized representative, and the ap- 
pellant in person, by attorney or by written statement, shall 
appear before the Board with their testimony. The Hoard 
shall impartially hear the matter and render its de> 
which shall be final and forever binding 011 both club and 
r 
SEC. 26. Any player under contract or reservation who 
may consider himself unjustly treated or wronged by his 
club shall have the right to submit his case to the Presi- 
dent of the League, who shall, after solicit ing evidence 
concerning the matti It the same to the Hoard for 

hearing, recommendation or adjudication. The Board 
shall have authority to impose any just line or pecuniary 
penalty on a club, a | warrant! 

.ts findings ami decisions, ami it may impose the e.\| 
ol trials and hearings on .1 li parties to the 

controversy. Hut such tine, penalty and expenses may 
be remitted by a three-fourths vote of the League upon 
appeal duly made and heard at an annual or special 
meeting. 

Individual Club Control. 

SEC. 27. Each club hail have the right to regulate its 
own affaii ,, r as 

the League may from tun- t.i 11 letermine, and. in doing 

tablish its own rules and to 
discipline, punish, suspend or expel its own ma: 

other employes, and t : 
limited play or open insubordination, 

but shall include all question <; difference 

or other conduct of the player that ni.r. led by the 

club as prejudicial to its interest, and nflict with 

any pi institution, or the Playing Rules 

of this League. 

Punishment of Scandalous Conduct. 
SEC. 28. 1 1 f the I 'tall have 

r, uiion proper proof, to suspend for a defii 
and t< ague 

manager or player guilty, in pubti 'i.ivior, 



11 

including intoxication, figb'ting, quarreling, JP$F*%[*£1 
other scandalous conduct, whether on or off the P la ?"8 
field, during the season, where the same », in his ^opinion, 
calculated to bring disrepute upon the National Leagut or 
National Game. Inch fine can only be remitted b y the 
Board of Directors after a hearing upon appeal duly probe 
cuted. 

Club Territorial Rights. 
. SEC. 29. Every club of this League shall have .exclus- 
ive control of the city in winch it IS located, and t tne 
territory surrounding such city, to the extent of five mues 
|n every direction from its corporate hmits. and »™» 
">K League club shall, under any circumstances k a u w 
to Play any dub in such territory Other ll,a " U \V UL j£ aI 
cl«b therein located, without the consent of the 
League club. 

Reservation of Players 
SEC. 30. Each club a member of this League shall be 
^titled to the right of reservation. On or be ore he 20 n 
day of Septembw in each year each club shal tra nsmit to 
*e Secretory a reserve list of the players whose service 
desi 



res to retail 



^7s«S0n, and who are then 
■ s current or tor 
addition thereto 
prior annual list who 



__e ensuing kw : (rir anv 

I to the said club for the current «rw "jy 

tho 
to- 

■irted 
P*her with all others thereafter to be regularly ccmttactecl 



succeeding Mason or se.,s,,us. and in addition he retc- tb 
names of such players reserved in any prior annt i. W 
have refused to contract with said club. Such WJ*" 



wuh namely, players who have bee,, secured bjpu 

M draft under the National Agreement >'Vf^„b in In* 

shall be ineligible to contract with any other cluD 

as hereinafter provided. NO auu 
have the right , . t more than thirty-five plovers, ■ 

>e of ineligible players, and no club she '- / - 
KVhl to retain more than twenty-five Payers, exc^ 

players (.see Rule 33, National Commission, , 
from May i 5 ih to August aoth. be j ore 

i- The Secretary shall promulgate such luti on o, 
September 25//1 of each year. hlayer 

clul 'shall have' the right to reserve any pm 
When in arrears of salary to hint. ... /,., ,/,,- 

„ 3. No release of a plarer shall be pn.muaaU "/'„-. 
President of the League without the approval of thi 
tient t,f //,,, ,,. „/, h i„.. rr under 

4- A failure to forward a contract to ■■ 



flayer 



12 

reservation on or before the first of March each year shall 
act as a release of the p 

Negotiating for Services. 
SEC. 31. No player, without the consent of the club 
with which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter 
into negotiations with any other club for future services. 

Contracts. 
SEC. 32. Contracts ma.de b club and its play- 

ers may be either by telegram or wril 
within ten .lays thereafter by form 

approved and promulgated by the i to all the clubs 

or tli. 

SEC. 33. The League shall adopt such form of contract 

as may be prescribed by the National Commission for the 
protection of the rights of the parties thereto. All 
tracts must be approved by the /'resident and duly pro- 
mulgated by him. Whenever a club serves notice 
player that Ins contract will be terminated in ten days it 
stall immediately notify by wire the President of the 
hall at once notify the other seven clubs .1 
failure to comply with this provision shall subject the club 
failing to a hue to he fixed by the Hoard of Directors; the 

tine to be not less than $25.00; and in a case where a 
lion of tins section results in the loss of the player to the 
National League it shall be at an amount commensurate 
With the players ability. I- or a period of ten days after 
notice of release is ser National League player 

any other club shall have the right to claim without cost 
lie player released and to negotiate for his services, and 
me player shall be inel contract with a club of 

another league. A club desiring to release a player to a 
'/,"" ?J " ue shall ash for permission through the 

president of the League, who shall ash for I from 

the other seven clubs. failure to reply to such 

request Within five days during the championship season 
' ' ■" ,«' Other limes, the President shall notify 

If ''f'"" 1 /"", '')''' '/"" Permission to release is granted. 
L • / d "'' ,?>"<" '•<-/»«• h mail or wire to waive claim 
then the following rules shall apply 

Mover ,'l'f n" y Y ■ f ""' // " '" h < "leased be a drafted 
Wtowate " PnCe S ' U '" bc <"' ul by " ,e rlub rcjus - 



13 

2. For any other player the price skull be Axed by the 
<U-nt of the League, provided that the amount so weed 

shall not exceed $1,500, and provided also thai if the draft 
price or the amount named by the /'resident is not accept 
able to the requesting club, or for any other reason, the 
request for Waivers may be withdrawn: said withdrawal 
must be made "within two days after notice by the I 
dent thai privilege of release has not been allowed. 

3. The President shall determine by lol in case two or 
mure clubs refuse to "waive. 

4. Refusal to waive must be followed by check upon 
notification of the amount by the President of the League. 

5- Waivers secured between ploying seasons expire ten 
days after the Opening of the championship season. 

t). Waivers secured 'during the championship season ex- 
pire thirty days after notice of request by the President of 
the 1. Clique. 

7. No player shall be released during the live-day waiver 
period. 

Suspension and Expulsion of Players. 

SEC. 34. Any player, while under contract with, 
iration bv, a League club, who shall without the con- 
sent of such club, cuter the service of any other club 111 
any capacity, shall be liable to expulsion by said League 
dub. Whenever a dub suspends or expels a manager 01 
P er. that club shall at once notify th • >' "' ""? 

! the date when the same takes effect, ana 
in ca mm. 111 or expulsion, the cause therj 

SEC. 35. player, who has been sus- 

pended or expelled from a League club, shall at any tunc 
thereafter be allowed to play with, or serve in any capaun. 
any League club (either the one expelling bim 01 anj 
other) artless the term ion by the club nas ex- 

I, or upon his appeal to this League, such expulsion or 
•uapi 11 ha Ve |„.,.„ get aside. 

Effect of Club Disbandment. 
SEC. 36. The disbandment of a League club, 01 
withdrawal from or loss of League membership, shall 
ate as a release of its placers from contract and reserva- 
tion with <a,d dub, but the right to contract w tii ana 
reserve said players shall revert to the League, ana m 
shall b« subject to transfer to such other dub ... t 
League may ncc "' llu 

sen ii 






14 

Playing with Outside Clubs. 
SEC. 37. No game of base ball shall be played be- 
a League club and any other club that has been ex- 
peiled from membership in this League. No game of ball 
shall be played between a League club and any other club 
employing or presenting in its nine a player expelled, or 
under suspension from the League, or otherwise ren- 
dered ineligible by this League or a club member thereof. 

Crookedness and its Penalties. 
SEC. 38. Any person who shall be proven guilty of 
ing, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to cause any 

game of 1> tit otherwise than on its merits under 

Playing Rules, shall be forever disqualified by the 
lent of the League from acting as umpire, manager, 
player or in any other capacity in any game of ball parti- 
cipated in by a League club. 

Umpires. 
SEC. 39. A staff of League umpires shall be selected by 
the President before the opening of the regular sea 

1. Applicant tor the position of umpire must state age. 

e, habits and r qualific 

as in.: 1 on forms prepared by the President, 

which must have the endorsement of those who from skilled 
and persona! knowledge can recommend the applicant for 
the position. 

Independent i however, the Presi- 

dent shall make inquiries and inform himself, as far U 
practicable, as to the merits and qualifications of each ap- 
plicant. 

2. They shall be paid luch salaries and allowed such 

as may be mutually agreed upon by contrs 
them and the President of the 1 I to the 

approval of the Hoard of I i ■ 

3. In tl of the failure of an umpire to umpire 

d to him it shall be the dutv of the Pre* 
dent to pi (0 umpire IUCTJ game; and it-' 

such cave titer' . xt payn 

the umpire one day's pay for ea,h assignment which f» r 
any reason he shall have failed to unij 

4. It shall !m ■ pt as 
umpire T I unptonship net) umpire 01 
stitute as the President shall assign to such game. In the 



10 

event of the non-appearance of the League umpire or f s "he 

rtitute at the hpuY a inted for the bc V m " g tX °\ ub . 

game cadi club captain shall then select one ot tne • 
»titnte player* of the opposing clubhand ^ro 

'elected shall be thVduly authorized umpires for 

game. , | r , 

5- H shall be the duty of umpires to enforce : to 

' they are written, regardless of personal c ■> ' Jj 

*«r merits, subject ... the President's mstructwni sas™ 

'e.r nrom-r i„,,V,,r,., : „io„ Thev shall familiarize mem 



as .. 
their 
thei 



'heir merits, subject to the President's ,«*«£?£? them- 
'heir proper interpretation. They shall &™ 1 "™* a 11 or- 

jelves with these sections of the I !1 - ' b *Jt sllch 

der« of the Pre igning their services and wear 

uniform on the playing field as he may designate. 



SEC. 40. 



Supervision of Umpires 




j >m uie umpire eoiiiju.i . • „,,, r itS or 

S , ''"■ ' ' in of this 

•its. [f the complaint be for a wilful violabonot to 
Constitution, or of ,i„. Playing Rules or for netfea :o 
ftwal to enf 0rce ;mv oi J A r „ies or for any "I 
gentlemanly language or condud while f ";'*.,' the 
'"I'.r-. and if upSn nvestigation il he subs a, ,. .. te£ 
dent shall have the right '''T ^ c may 

W the offender, as in his judgment the offense 

tltv 

Committees. t j ]C 

At each annual meeting of .the ^™% yiue 
,", 'dent shall appoint a committee o lhl V , ' imittee 
R f "K a committed of three on Schedule and a comm 
" "Tee on Constitutional Amendments. 



Ustify 

SEC. 41. 



The Championship. , 

SE C42. The Champions!,,,, of this League shall 
'V'",'!-! for yearlj bj the clubs composing «-. fom 
, s , Ec -43. The championship season ^fg^league 
"< h 'ate i„ Apri , to lucn date in October as the ^ 
"^.determine at its stated oi special meeting. 

SEC. 44. Every game played between two | o |hc 
21 commencement of the championship seas ubs 

°«apIetion of the champion 






16 

shall be a game for the championship, and no League club 
shall lend or exchange players to or with each Other for 
any frame played during the championship Any 

violation of this section shall subject each offender to a 
111]'- of Sioo. 

SEC. 45. Each club shall play twenty-two or more 
championship games with every other club in the League. 
A tie game, or a game prevented by ram or otl 
shall be played ofl on tin same ground on wl duled 

durmg the same or any subsequent series, the date > 
optional wiih the home club. Provided, that the dat 
playing off such postponed or tie gam 
fixed by the home club; the visiting club and President of 
the League to be notified of such date 
P. M.. oi day such postponement or tie occurs; and in 
event date tor such play-off be fixed for the next day of 
the same series, the home club shall also notify the umpire 
or umpires then officiating in that city, [f, however, all 
"' , ' 1 ' heduled on any ground have bee,, 

. and any such game remains unplayed, then 
game sbal if possible, be played ..If on the ground of the 
opposite club on a date to be determined by said dub. 

SEC. 4fi. 
ship ser 
grounds 

in all the details oi mes'that e The 

nghl raiting club under the Plaj 

relate 

patrons of the- home club, the visiting club shall def 
he wishes pf the home club; pn . that 

the home club shall not be permitted to ch usual 

hour fur the commc. 

ticular city more than thirty {30) minuti | first 

having obtam. 

under a penalty to the. visiting dub of $500 Tl 
club snail furnish to 
the battue.' • ,ts nine ' 

if re- 
' the fail- 
msh t he battn 

shan forfeit the s,,,,, r ,f $, n . which amount shall be h 
diately transmitted to t> 
the . ce from him ,,f th. 

fine, which nonce shall t ary npon 

receipt of complaint from tl fob. 



^e uuu .... a uaie to be (ietermmed bv said club. 
:• 4H. Rad, dub shall lev half of 'the cbampion- 
teries 01 games wit! ther club played 01 

'''• except provided in Section 4-,: and 




The Championship Schedule. 

S EC. 47. All championship games J 1 ?" * V^Sm 
a writ du i e ,. r ' . p;lIt .l by the Schedule Comm 

and reported to and ad :u ' by , ',,„ se;i - 

fourl1 ' Fore the beginning of the d,:l,n '; 1 "' Xr of 

son - T he (hall provide for an equal "" »; r , 

T"'"" and nhall specify the dat. PXdule 

*e date of each series of games. No date ... »**2££ 
ubsequently be chanled, except (i) by written 

from i date fixed by the schedule tor 
;i game between such clubs to an open date on .. >e . 
ground; or i trided in Section 451 " r 13 ",- 

wmtei fourths of all the League ciuw. 

.Any dub or clubs violating this section Bhall w • 

J b ^toa penalty of $i,ooa Said | . ,r f 

hi hours v easurer of *e League, or ^ 

o paid to be withheld from any funds fo tnew 

« the hands „f the Treasurer. All P. ra «»TffllS 

""" of this section shall not count »■ * e championsmp 



The Admission Fees and Receipts. 
H«? : hall Be fifty (so) cents, but «»chc iud 

' ' •".n,,M,„, fee t, hall be rw. basis 

n? 'J-— fi- •■;" , bl - '":":? he grounds 

,1'.." ! fas) 

•""' which is 



ichpan of said grounds all dms' 

on the basis of .tw. - ,. noffle 

r!,',K '"' ' champioi , ,, ,.,,„ 

K* ha " dc,iv « to the manage, of the ™ *'"? £signate< 

oS a : an " nitb y mai,tothe ^"rf* slTe) : 

"" '-IIS r,f .1,.. . -..I. .. , ,n I" 1...I. 



he li<"" c 

d 

ed 

; ' ''"''''""."Vimi-M^l"'!'' 
STfiS """— ' "-ball pay 

to ,,,'• '"''"' ; "" 1 »*« Sots. 

10 we vuiting dub fifty per centum ol said receipts. 



f the' 



18 

The Ball Park. 
SEC. 49. Each park shall be provided with a sufficient 
number of exits and entrances for the accommodation of 
the public, and a separate entrance shall be maintained for 
the convenience of the press representatives and those 
entitled to the courtesies of the grounds. 

1. Additional entrances may be opened upon holidays, 
but for such days the visiting club shall be given at least 
ten days' notice of the whole number and their location. 

2. Emergency gates may be opened at any time by con- 
sent of the visiting club, if occasion requires. 

3. Each park shall also be provided with proper and 
suitable dressing room or rooms for visiting players, the 
same to be supplied with toilet conveniences, hoi and cold 
water, and shower baths, and t,, contain twenty suitable 
lockers for such players. Such dressing rooms to be prop- 
erly heated and cared for, and made subject to the control 
during the occupancy thereof of the players of the visiting 
club. The penalty for failure to provide and maintain 
such dressing rooms shall be twenty-five dollars ($25.00) 
for each day of failure to provide the same according to 
this rule, the same to be assessed and collected by the 
Secretary of the League upon complaint of the visiting club. 

4. A visiting club shall not be permitted to convey its' 
players, to or from the grounds of any other club, in 
uniform unless special permission therefor has been first 
granted by the President of the League, or some great 
emergency arises to warrant it. A violation of this rule 
shall be punishable by the infliction of a fine of fifty dollars 
for each day the rule is violated 



The Turnstile Count. 
SEC. 50. The number of persons admitted to the 
grounds shall be determined by the use of the necessary 
number of self-registering turnstiles, the arms of which 
shall extend within four inches of a dividing partition, the 
keys of which shall be delivered to the agent of the visit- 
ing club before the opening of the grounds for each game; 
and said agent of the visiting club shall have full access 
to such turnstile, and the box of such turnstile shall not be 
removed until after the close of the seventh inning, and in 
case a carriage gate is used a ticket for each person ad 
mitted through such gate shall at once be delivered to the 
agent of the visiting club. The visiting club shall have 



19 

the right to accept the turnstile count for each and all 
games, or to count all tickets. Each club shall be required 
to use for its business tickets, with rain checks attached, 
which have been approved by the League and which can 
be readily counted. At the conclusion of each game the 
visiting club shall receive a copy of the ticket sale state- 
ment. 

Special Entrance. 

SEC. 51. No person shall be admitted free to a cham- 
pionship game, except players and officers of contesting 
clubs, umpires, policemen in uniform, necessary employes 
of the home club, representatives of the press and such 
invited guests as the President of the home club may 
deem proper to recognize, all of whom must pass through 
a self-registering turnstile at the special entrance provided 
for the press, and said turnstile shall be subject to the 
same right of inspection by the visiting club that is pro- 
vided in all other entrances. 

i. It shall be the duty of the President of the League to 
inspect all ball parks from time to time, and to report to 
the Jioard of Directors any failure to comply with this 
or any other section of the Constitution. 

Stopping Play to Catch Trains. 
SEC. 52. On any day when either club is required to 
leave a city to, or in order to reach another city in time, 
where it is scheduled to play its next game, the home club 
shall be compelled, upon proper notice by the visiting 
club, to begin the game three hours and a half before the 
time of the departure of the last train by means of which 
either club can reach next scheduled point in time. And 
either club may leave the field at any time within one hour 
of said train time without forfeiting any rights or privi- 
leges, provided five innings on each side have been played, 
and the umpire shall be the sole judge of the time. 

Rain Checks. 
SEC. 53. Tn the event of a game being stopped by ram 

or declared forfeited befon npletion of five innings, 

the visiting club shall not be entitled to its percentage of 
receipts. 

Forfeited Games. 
SEC. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games— 
to count in its series as games won by a score ot nine 



20 

runs to none — in case where the umpire in any champion- 
ship game shall award the game to such club on account 
of the violation bj the contesting club of any section of 
this Constitution or of any playing rules. In the event of a 
forfeiture for any reason, the forfeiting club shall incur 
such penalty not exceeding one thousand dollars as m 
imposed by the Board of Directors after a hearing held 
within one week from the date of such game, and any 
damages suffered by the non-offending club shall be paid 
out of Mich penalty. In addition to the penalty above re- 
ferred to, the captain or manager, or th in charge 
of ili<' offending team and responsible for the team leav 
nig the field, shall incur a penalty of one hundred dollars, 
which shall be paid within five days to the Secretary of the 
League, said penalty not to be remitted under any 'circum- 
stances. i„ case such penalties are not paid within ten 
days after being imposed, the club and player cannot par- 
ticipate in a championship game. 

Drawn Games. 
SEC. 55. Drawn, tie and hall not 

count in the series as games (but any game ol than 

ive innings shall be included in the averages,. |„n ,„„s t 
be player! ff, it possible, as provided in Section 45. If 
Il ", v '■■""";' ',"■ Played off. as therein provided, they mav 
subsequently be played ..IT. if sufficient time exists b< 
the close of the season. 

ible games tor one admission shall not be permitted 
unless previously scheduled as such or rendered compul- 
sory by the playing off of postpom as provided in 
Section 45. v 

Winning the Pennant. 
SEC. 56. The club which hall 1 ive WOtl the greatest 
ntage I Of games ,n the championship serie . h all be 

red the champion club of tins League for the 
season in winch such game. u , '[„ ,he event 

that two or more clubs -ball have won the 
'''■ntage of games, then the Board shall at once arra, 
special series of three games between any two of such 
clubs such games 1 ,| a , , M( . ,.,„„;. ,,,- ,,„. ,.,,,,„ 

pronship season all be in. 

m the championship record, and counted in determining 
the award of the championship. In such case only the pro- 
visions of this Constitution prohibiting the playing or re- 



21 

cording as championship games, games played after the ; ex- 
piration of the championship season, shall have no ettect. 
The emblem of the championship shall be a pennant lot 
the National colors; to cost not less than one hundred 
dollars ($100). It shall be inscribed with the motto, 
"Champion Base Ball Club of the National League, witn 
the name of the club and the year in which the title was 
won, and the champion club shall be entitled to tty tne 
pennant until the close of the ensuing year. 

Deciding the Championship. 

SEC. 57. The championship shall be decided in the 
following manner: Within twenty-four hours after every 
match game played for the championship, the official scot , > 
of the home club shall prepare and forward to Hie secre- 
tary of the League a statement containing the tun score 
oi the game, according to the system specified m tne riay 
ing R ether with the date, the place where played, 

the name of the clubs and umpires; provided, that no tie 
or drawn game shall be considered a game tor any pur 
pose except the averages; and provided, further, tnai i 
any case where the Secretary shall n< V u !„ 

Championship game within five days alter the p la} injj 
ante, the dub whose duty it [ward sucn 

score shall pay to the League the sum of $2 as the penany 
of such default. , ,. „„_„ „ 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall pre pare a 
tabula games won and lost by eacn auv, 

ding to the statemenl so sent him, winch s tate < 
shall be the sob- evidence in the marl ! a, 'i, 

with the statement so sent him, to the Board, whicn 
shall make the award in writing, and report Hie same 
th< I • ting. . 

In making the award the Board shall consider. 

i. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

-'. Forfeited gam ,. , , „,,„ ,.;th- 

3. Can,,, participated in by clubs winch have 
drawn, disbanded or forfeited their members > « ■< "' '» l 
completing their champio es with a other wag 

clubs, such games shall be counted to the follow "ff « ** \ 

The Board shall ascertain the leas t numbe of • 
pionship games played by such dub with ?ny dub remam 
ing in the League/and shall from the first* « paroa 
pated in during :iOS by 



22 

club, count in the series of each League club a similar 
number of games, and all other games participated in by 
such retired club shall not be counted in the championship 
series. Provided, that if such retired club shall have 
failed to play at least one championship game with every 
League club, all games participated in by it shall be thrown 
out entirely. 

Meetings. 

SEC. 58. The annual meeting of the League shall be 
held on the second Tuesday in December of each year at 
two o'clock P. M. in New York City. Adjourned mcct- 
of the annual meeting may be held at other places 
and at such times as shall be determined by resolution of 
the National League or its Board of Directors from time 
to time. The schedule meeting shall be held annually in 
New York City on such date in February as the President 
of the League may determine, ten days' notice of which 
must be given to the club members. 

SEC. 59. Special meetings may be called by the Presi- 
dent of the League on his own option or on the written 
rail of six clubs, or a majority of the Board of Directors, 
at such times and places as they may from time to time 
determine. 

Club Representation. 
SEC. 60. At such meeting each club shall be repre- 
sented and shall be entitled to two representatives, and 
to have in addition thereto any of its officers or ex-officers 
present at sueh meetings; but no club shall be permitted to 
send as a representative any person under contract or 
engagement as a ball player or manager, and belonging to 
said club in such capacity. They shall, if requested by any 
other club representative, present a certificate of their 
appointment duly attested by at least two officers of their 
club showing their authority to act, but no club shall have 
more than one vote. 



Executive Session. 

SEC. 61. This League may, upon a majority vote of its 
members, elect to go into executive session for the trans- 
action of its business, and during such session no club 
shall be entitled to more than two representatives. 



23 

Quorum. 
SEC. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall 
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a 
less number may adjourn from time to time until a quorum 
is obtained. When obtained it may be maintained by lock- 
ing the doors of the meeting room, the appointment of 
doorkeepers and such other procedures usual in parliamen- 
tary bodies to maintain quorums and dispatch business. 

Order of Business. 
SEC. 63. The following shall be the order of business 
unless suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club mem- 
bers : 

i. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Report of Committees. 

4. Report of President. 

5. Election of New Members. 

6. Election of Officers. 

7. Amendment of Constitution. 

8. Adoption of Playing Rules. 

9. Miscellaneous Business. 
10. Adjournment. 



Amendments. 
SEC. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be 
altered or amended by a three-fourths vote of the League 
at any annual meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any 
other time. Any section of this Constitution may be sus- 
pended or rendered non-applicable by a three-fourths vote 
of the League (excepting as hereinafter provided) at the 
annual meeting of the League. Provided, however, that 
this section and Sections 3, 8, 9, 38, 48 shall not be altered 
or amended except by a unanimous vote of this League. 
(2) Any section of this Constitution may be suspended or 
its provision made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a 
League meeting. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 




25 

Official Playing Rules Professional 
Base Ball Clubs 

As adopted at the meeting of the Joint Playing Rules Committee of the 

National League and the American League, held at National 

League Headquarters, New York City, March 2, 1904. 

Amended February 14, 1906; February 25, 1907; 

February 27, 1908; February 17, 1909. 

and January 24, 1910. 

Amendments indicated by Italics. 



The Ball Ground. 

The ball ground must be enclosed. To ob- 

RULE 1. viate the necessity for ground rules, the 

shortest distance from a fence or stand on 

fair territory to the home base should be 235 feet and from 

home base to the grand stand 90 feet. 



To Lay Off the Field. 

To lay off the lines defining the location 
RULE 2. of the several bases, the catcher's and the 
pitcher's position and to establish the boun- 
daries required in playing the game of base ball, proceed as 
follows : 

Diamond or Infield. 
From a point, A, within the grounds, project a straight 
line out into the field, and at a point, R, 154 feet from point 
A, lay off lines B C and I! I) at right angles to the line 
A B ; then, with B as a center and 63.63945 feet as a radius, 
describe arcs cutting the lines B A at F and B C at G, B D 
at II and B E at I. Draw lines F G, G E, E H, and H F, 
which said lines shall be the containing lines of the Dia- 
mond or Infield. 

The Catcher's Lines. 

With F as a center and 10 feet radius, de- 

RULE 3. scribe an arc cutting line F A at L, and 

draw lines L M and L O at right angles 

to F A, and continue same out from F A not less than 

10 feet 



26 

The Foul Lines. 

From the intersection point, F, continue 
RULE 4. the straight lines F G and F H until they 
intersect the lines L M and L O, and then 
from the points G and H in the opposite direction until 
they reach the boundary lines of the ground, and said lines 
shall be clearly visible from any part of the diamond, and 
no wood or other hard substance shall be used in the' con- 
struction of such lines. 



RULE 5. 



The Players' Lines. 

With F as center and 50 feet radius, 
describe arcs cutting lines F O and F M 
at P and Q; then, with F as center again 
and 75 feet radius, describe arcs cutting F G and F H at 
R and S ; then, from the points P. Q, R and S draw lines 
at right angles to the lines F O, F M, F G and F H and 
continue the same until they intersect at the Doin'ts T 
and W. 

The Coachers' Lines. 

..... - Wilh , R and S as centers and 15 feet 

RULE, b. radus. describe arcs cutting the lines R W 

v 1 v t r ' a , f , ? a . mI Y and froi » *« Points 

X and Y draw lines parallel with the lines F H and F G 
and continue same out to the boundary lines of the ground! 

The Three-Foot Line. 
With F as a center and 45 feet radius, 
describe an arc cutting the line F G at I, and 
from 1 to the distance of three feet draw a 
line at right angles to F G and marked point 2; then from 
point 2, draw a line parallel with the line F G to a point 
three feet beyond the point G, marked 3; then from the 
point 3 draw a line at right angles to line 2, 3, back to 
and intersecting with F G, and from thence back along the 
line G F to point 1. s 

The Batsman's Lines. 

rim f « °k e ' ther sid .f, of the ,ine A F B de- 

RULE 8. scribe two parallelograms six feet long and 
four feet wide (marked 8 and 9). their 
longest side being parallel with the line A F B their 
distance apart being six inches added to each end 'of the 
length of the diagonal of the square within the angle F 
and the center of their length being on said diagonal 



RULE 7. 



27 

The Pitcher's Plate. 
Section i. With point F as center and 
RULE 9. 60.5 feet as radius, describe an arc cutting 
the line F B at line 4, and draw a line 5, 6, 
passing through point 4 and extending 12 inches on either 
side of line F B; then with line 5, 6, as a side, describe a 
parallelogram _>4 inches by 6 inches, in which shall be lo- 
cated the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 2. The pitcher's plate shall not be more than 15 
inches higher than the base lines or the home plate, which 
shall be level with the surface of the field, and the slope 
from the pitcher's plate to every base line and the home 
plate shall be gradual. 



The Bases. 
Section t. Within the angle F, describe 
RULE 10. a five-siiled figure, two of the sides of which 
shall coincide with the lines F G and F II 
to the extent of 12 inches each, thence parallel with the 
line F B &'/2 inches to the points X and V. a straight line 
between which, 17 inches, will form the front of the home 
base or plate. 

Sec. 2. Within the angler, at G, I and II describe 
squares, whose sides arc 15 nches in length, two ol such 
sides of which squares shall lie along the lines F G and 
G I, G I and I II, I II and II !■". which squares shall be 
the location of the first, second and third bases respectively. 



The Home Base at I' and the Pitchers 
rule 11. Plate at 4 must each be of whitened rubber, 
and so fixed in the ground as to be even 
with its surface. 

The First Base at (1. the Second Base 
RULE 12. at E, and the Third Base at II must each 
be a white canvas bag filled With soft ma- 
terial and securely fastened in place at the points specified 
in Rule 10. 

The lines described in Rules 3- 4. S. <*> 7. 

RULE 13. and 8 must be marked with lime, chalk or 

Other white material, easily distinguishable 
from the ground or grass. 



28 

The Ball. 
Section i. The ball must weigh not less 
RULE 14. than five nor more than five and one-quar- 
ter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not 
less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches 
in circumference. 'I he Spalding National League Ball or 
the Reach American League Ball must be used in all 
games played under these rules. 

Sec. 2. Two regulation balls of the make adopted by 
the league of which the contesting clubs are members, 
shall be delivered by the home club to the umpire at or 
before the hour for the commencement of a championship 
game. If the ball placed in play be batted or thrown out 
of the grounds or into one of the stands for spectators 
or in the judgment of the umpire, become unlit for play 
from any cause, the umpire shall at once deliver the alter- 
nate ball to the pitcher and another legal ball shall be sup- 
plied to him, so thai he shall at all times have in his con 
trol one or more alternate balls. Provided, however, that 
all balls batted or thrown out of the ground or into a stand 
shall when returned to the field be given into the custody 
of the umpire immediately and become alternate ball 
so long as he has in his possession two or more alternate 
balls, he shall not call for a new ball to replace one that has 
gone out of play. The alternate balls shall become the ball 
in play in the order in which they were delivered i 
umpire. 

Sec. .1. [mmediately upon the delivery to him of the 
alternate ball by the umpire, the pitcher shall take his posi- 
tion and on the call of "Play," by the umpire, it -hall bi 
come the ball in play. Provided, however, that play shall 
not be resumed with the alternate ball when a fair batted 
ball or a ball thrown by a fielder goes out of the -round' 
or into a stand for spectators until tin 

completed the circuit of tii, bases unless compelled to stop 

at second or third base in compliance with a ground 
rule. 



The Spalding Lewie Ball has been adopted by the National League 
for the ..ast thirty-three years an<l is used in all the League contests 

^«^str iOTiij of o,i a ESS 

For junior clubs (clubs composed of boys under IB years of aire) we 
recommend them to use the Spalding Boys' League Ball and that rames 
played by Junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games the same 
as if played with the Official League Ball. 



■■ 



29 

Discolored or Damaged Balls. 

Sec. 4. In the event of ;i ball being intentionally dis- 
colored by rubbing it with the soil or otherwise by any 
player, or otherwise damaged by any player, the umpire 
shall forthwith demand the return of that ball and substi- 
tute for it another legal ball, as hereinbefore described, 
and impose a line of $5.00 on the offending player. 

Home Club to Provide Balls. 
Sec. 5. In every game the balls played with shall be 
furnished by the home club, and the last in play shall 

bee e the property of the winning club. Each ball shall 

be enclosed in a paper box, which must be sealed with 
the seal of the President of the League and bear his certifi- 
cate that he has examined, measured and weighed the ball 
contained therein and thai it i- of the required standard in 
all respects. The seal shall not be broken by the umpire 
except in the presence of the captains of the contesting 
teams after "Play" has been called. 

Reserve Balls on Field. 
Sec. 6. The borne club shall have at least a dozen reg- 
ulation balls on the field during each championship game, 
ior use on the call of the umpire. 

The Bat. 

The bat must be round, not over two and 
RULE 15. three-fourth inches in diameter at the thick- 
esl part, nor more than 42 inches in length 
and entirely of hardwood, except that for a distance of 
[8 inches from tin: end, twine may In- wound around or 
a granulated substance applied to the handle. 

Number of Players in a Game. 

The playen of each club, actively cn- 
RULE 16. gaged in a game at one time, shall be nine 
in number, one of whom shall act as cap- 
tain; and in no cast- shall more or less than nine men be 
allowed to play on a side in a game. 

Positions of the Players. 
The players of the team not at bat may 
RULE 17. be stationed at any points of the field on 

jair ground their captain may elect, regard- 

ctive positions, except that the pitcher, 
Whilie in the act of delivering the ball to the bat must take 



30 

his position as defined in Rules g and jo ; and the catcher 
must be within the lines of his position, as defined in 
Rule ,}, and within 10 feet of home base, whenever the 
pitcher delivers the ball to the bat. 

Must Not Mingle With Spectators. 

Players in uniform shall not be permit- 
RULE 18. ted to occupy seats in the stands, or to 
mingle with the spectators. 

Uniforms of Players. 

r,.,, rr ,n • ^7°' dUb slml ' ; ' <l0 > )l UVO ""'forms for 

RULE 19. its players, one to be worn in games at 
home and the other in games abroad, and 
the suits of each of the uniforms of a team shall conform 
in color and style. Xo player who shall attach anything 
to the sole or heel of his shoe other than the ordinary base 
ball shoe plate, or who shall appear in a uniform not com 
forming to the suits of the other members of his team, 
shall be permitted to take part -in a game. 

Size and Weight of Gloves. 

.... _ „„ , Th * catcher or first baseman may wear a 

RULE 20. glove or mitt of any size, shape o'r weight. 
Every other player is restricted to the use 
ot a glove "f mm weighing not over 10 ounces and meas- 
uring not over 14 inches around the palm. 

Players' Benches. 
Skitiox i. Players" benches must be fur- 
nished by the home club and placed upon 
a portion of the ground not less than twen- 
ty-five (25) feet outside of the players' lit. I h such 
bench shall be for llie exclusive use of ||,, .. ,,..„„ 
and the other for 1 .1 i|,,. ].,,.,,. u ,.j m 
Each bench must be covered with a roof and closed at the 
hack and each end: a space, however, nol more than six 
(6) inches wide may be left under the roof for ventil. 
All players and substitutes of tl. • bat must be 
seated on their team's bench, except the batsman, base- 
runners and such as arc legally assigned to coach b 
runners. Under no circumstances -hall the umpire permit 
any person except the players and substitutes in uniform 
and the manager of the team entitled to its exclusive use 
to be seated on a bench, 



RULE 21. 



31 

Penalty for Violation. 
Sec. 2. Whenever the umpire observes a violation 

01 i lie preceding section, he .shall immediately order 
such player or players as have disregarded it to be 
ed. Ii the order be not obeyed within one minute the 
Offending player or players shall be lined $5.00 each by the 
umpire. Ii the order be no! then obeyed within one minute, 
the Offending player or players shall be debarred from 
lurther participation in the game, and shall be obliged to 
forthwith leave the playing field. 

A Regulation Game. 

Every championship game must be com- 

RULE 22. menced not later than two hours before 

sunset and shall continue until each team 

has had nine innings, provided, however, that the game 

shall terminate: 

SECTION 1. If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine 
innings than the other side has scored in eight innings. 

SEC. 2. if the side last al bat In the ninth inning SO 
the winning run before the third man is out. 

Sec. 3. If the game be called by the umpire on account 
"I darkness, rain, lire, panic, or for other cause which puts 
patrons or players in peril. 



RULE 23. 



Extra-Inning Games. 
If the score be a tie at the end of nine 
for each team, play shall be 
continued until one side has scored more 
runs than the other in an equal number of innings, pro- 
vided, thai if the side last at bat score the winning run 
before the third man is out in any inning after the ninth, 
ime shall terminate. 

Drawn Games. 

A drawn game shall be declared by the 
RULE 24. umpire if the score is equal on the last 
even inning played when he terminates 
Play in accordance with Rule 22, Section 3, after five or 
more equal innings have been played by each team. But 
>< the side that went Second to bat is at the bat when the 
Batue is terminated, anil has scored the same nunilx 
runs as the other side, the umpire shall declare the game 
drawn without regard to the score of the last equal inning. 



32 

Called Games. 

If the umpire calls a game in accordance 
RULE 25. with Rule -'J. Section 3, at any time after five 
innings have been completed, the score 
shall be that of the last equal innings played, except that 
if the side second at bat shall have scored in an unequal 
number of innings, or before the completion of the un- 
finished inning, at least one run more than the side first at 
bat, the score of the game shall be the total number of runs 
each team has made. 



Forfeited Games. 
A forfeited game shall be declared by the 
RULE 26. umpire in favor of the club not in fault, in 
the following cases: 

Section i. If the team of a club fail to appear upon the 
field, or being upon the field, refuse to begin a game for 
which it is scheduled or assigned, within five minutes after 
the umpire has called "Flay"' at the hour for the beginning 
of the game, unless such delay in appearing, or in com- 
mencing the game, be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuse to 
continue to play, unless the game has been suspended or 
terminated by the umpire. 

Sec. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the umpire, 
one side fails to resume playing in one minute after the 
umpire has called "Play." 

Sec. 4. If a team employ tactics palpably designed to 
delay the game. 

Six. 5. If, after warning by the umpire, any one of the 
rules of the game be wilfully and persistently violated. 

Sec. 6. If the order for the removal of a player, as 
authorized by Rules 21, 58 and 67, be not obeyed within 
one minute. 

Sec. 7. If, because of the removal of players from the 
game by the umpire, or for any cause, there be less than 
nine players on either team. 

Set-. &'. If, after the game has been suspended on account 
of rain, the orders of the umpire are not complied with as 
required by Rule 29. 

Six. 9. If, when two games are scheduled to be played 
in one afternoon, the second game be not commenced 
within ten minutes of the time of the completion of the 
first game. The umpire of the first game shall be the 
timekeeper. 



33 

Sec. to. In case the umpire declare the game forfeited 
lie shall transmit a written report thereof to the president 
of the League within twenty-four hours thereafter. How- 
ever, a failure on the part of the umpire to so notify the 
president shall not affect the validity of his award of the 
game by forfeiture. 

No Game. 
"No game" shall be declared by the um- 
RULE 27. pire if he terminates play in accordance with 
Rule 22, Sec. 3, before five innings are com- 
pleted by each team. Provided, however, that if the club 
second at bat shall have made more runs at the end of 
its fourth inning than the club first at bat has made in five 
completed innings of a game so terminated, the umpire 
shall award the game to the club having made the greater 
number of runs, and it shall count as a legal game in the 
championship record. 

Substitutes. 

Section i. Each side shall be required 
RULE 28. to have present On the field during a cham- 
pionship game a sufficient number of sub- 
stitute players in uniform, conforming to the suits worn 
by their team-mates, to carry out the provisions of this 
ei.de which requires that not less than nine players shall 
occupy the field in any inning of the game. 

Sec. 2. Any such substitute may at any stage of the 
game take the place of a player whose name is in his 
tram's batting order, but the player whom he succeeds 
shall not thereafter participate in that game. 

Sec. 3. A base-runner shall not have another player 
whose name appears in the hatting order of his team run 
for him except by the consent of the captain of the other 
team. 

Sec, /. Whenever one player is substituted for another, 

whether as batsman, base runner or liclder. the captain 0] 

the side making the change must immediately notify the 
umpire, who in turn must announce the same to the spec- 
tators. .1 line of $5.00 shall be assessed by the umpire 
against the captain for each violation of this rule, and the 
/'resident of the League shall impose a similar fine against 
the umpire who, after having been notified of a change, 
fails to make proper announcement, /'lay shall be sus- 
pended white announcement is being made, and the player 
substituted shall become actively engaged in the game 



34 

immediately upon his captain's notice of the change to the 
umpire. 

Choice of Innings — Fitness of Field for Play. 

The choice of innings shall be given to 
RULE 29. the captain of the home club, who shall be 
the sole judge of the fitness of the ground 
for beginning a game after a rain; but, after play has been 
called by the umpire, he alone shall be the judge as to the 
fitness of the ground for resuming play after the game has 
been suspended on account of rain, and when time is so 
called the ground-keeper and sufficient assistants shall be 
under the control of the umpire for the purpose of putting 
the ground in proper shape for play, under penalty of 
forfeiture of the game by the home team. 

THE PITCHING RULES. 
Delivery of the Ball to the Bat. 

Preliminary to pitching, the pitcher shall 
RULE 30. take his position facing the batsman with 
both feet squarely on the ground and in 
front of the pitcher's plate; and in the act of delivering the 
ball to the bat he must keep one foot in contact with the 
pitcher's plate defined in Rule g. He shall not raise either 
foot until in the act of delivering the ball to the bat, nor 
make more than one step in such delivery. 

A Fairly Delivered Ball. 

A fairly delivered ball is a ball pitched 
RULE 31. or thrown to the bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that passes over any portion of the home base, before 
touching the ground, not lower than the batsman's knee, 
nor higher than his shoulder. For every such fairly deliv- 
ered ball the umpire shall call one strike. 

An Unfairly Delivered Ball. 
An unfairly delivered ball is a ball de- 
RULE 32. livtred to the bat by the pitcher while 

standing in his position and facing the bats- 
'nan that does not pass over any portion of the home base 
between the batsman's shoulder and knees, or that touches 
the ground before passing home base, unless struck at by the 
batsman; or, with the bases unoccupied, any ball delivered 



35 

hy the pitcher while either foot is not iii contact with the 
pitcher's plate. For every unfairly delivered ball the 
umpire shall call one ball. 



Delaying the Game. 

Section i. If, after the batsman be stand- 
RULE 33. ing in his proper position ready to strike at 
a pitched ball, the ball be thrown by the 
pitcher to any player other than the catcher when in 
the catcher's lines and within 10 feet of the home base (ex- 
cept in an attempt to retire a base runner), each ball so 
thrown shall be called a ball. 

Sec. 2. The umpire shall call a ball on the pitcher each 
time he delays the game by failing to deliver the ball to 
the batsman for a longer period than 20 seconds, excepting 
that at the commencement of each inning, or when a pitch- 
er relieves another, the pitcher may occupy one minute in 
delivering not to exceed five balls to the catcher or an 
infielder, during which time play shall be suspended. 

Sec. 3. In event of the pitcher being taken from his 
position by either manager or captain, the player substi- 
tuted for him shall continue t" pitch until the batsman 
then at bat has either been put out or has reached first base. 



Balking. 
A balk shall be : 
RULE 34. Section I. Any motion made by the 

pitcher while in position to deliver the ball 
to the bat without delivering it, or to throw to first base 
when occupied by a base runner without completing the 
throw. 

Sec. 2. Throwing the ball by the pitcher to any base to 
catch the base runner without stepping directly toward 
such base in the act of making such throw. 

Sec. 3. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while either fool i- back of the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 4. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while he is not facing the batsman. 

Sec. 5. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by 
the pitcher while not in the position defined by Rule 30. 

Sec. (,. Holding of the ball by the pitcher so long as, in 
the opinion of the umpire, to unnecessarily delay the game. 

Sec. 7. Making am motion to pitch while standing in his 
position without having the ball in his possession. 



36 

Sec. 8. Making any motion of the arm, shoulder, hip or 
body the pitcher habitually makes in his method of delivery, 
without immediately delivering the ball to the bat. 

Sec. 9. Delivery of the ball to the bat when the catcher 
is standing outside the lines of the catcher's position as 
defined in Rule 3. 

If the pitcher shall fail to comply with the requirements 
of any section of this rule, the umpire shall call a "balk." 

Dead Ball. 

A dead ball is a ball delivered to the bat 
RULE 35. by the pitcher, not struck at by the bats- 
man, that touches any part of the bats- 
man's person or clothing while he is standing in his position. 
Ball Not in Play. 

In case of an illegally batted ball, a balk, 

RULE 36. foul hit ball not legally caught, .lead ball, 

interference with the fielder or batsman, or 

a fair hit hall Striking a base runner or umpire / 

touching a fielder, the ball shall not 1m- considered in play 
until it be held by the pitcher standing in hi. position, and 
the umpire shall have called "Play." 

Block Balls. 
SlCTIOM i. A block is a battel or thrown 
ball that is touched, stopped <>r handled by 
a person not engaged in the game. 
Sec. 2. Whenever a block occur, the umpire shall de- 
clare it. and base runner- may run the bases without liabil- 
ity to be put out until the ball has been returned 10 and 
held by the pitcher in his position. 

Sec. 3. If the person not engaged in the game should 
retain possession of a blocked ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the fielders, the umpire .hall call 
"lime" and require each base rui base 

last touched by him until the hall be returned 10 the pitcher 
in his position and the umpire shall have called "Play." 

THE BATTING RULES. 
The Batsman's Position. 

"' the side at bat shall be- 
come the batsman and must take hi 
tion with,,, the batsman', line. | 

in Rule 8) in the order that his name appears ,',, his team's 

batting list. 



RULE 37. 



RULE 38. 



37 

The Order of Batting. 

Section i. The batting order of each 

RULE 39. team must be on the score curd and must be 

delivered before the game by its captain to 

the umpire at the home plate, who shall submit it to the 

inspection of the captain of the other side. The batting order 

delivered to the umpire must be followed throughout the 

unless a player be substituted for another, in which 

the substitute must take the place in the batting order 

of the retired player. 

Sec. 2. When the umpire announces the pitcher prior 
'" commencement of game, the player announced must 
pitch until the first batsman has cither been put out or has 
reached first base. 

The First Batsman in an Inning. 

After the first inning the fust striker in 
RULE 40. each inning shall be the batsman whose 
name follows that of the last man who 
completed his "time at bat" in the preceding inning. 



RULE 41. 



Players Belong on Bench. 
When a the bal its players 

must immediately seat themselves on the 
bench assigned to them as defined in Rule 
21, and remain there until their side is put out, except 
wh.M called to the bat or to act as coachers or substitute 
1 runners. 

Reserved for Umpire, Catcher and Batsman. 

No player of the side "at bat," except the 
RULE 42. batsman, -hall occupy any portion of the 
. space within the catcher's lines as defined 

in Rule 3. The triangular space back I I the home base 19 

red for th< of the umpire, catcher and 

batsman, and the umpire must prohibit any player of the 
Mde "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the 
^11 is in the hands of the pitcher or catcher, or passing 
between them while standing in their positions. 

Fielder Has Right of Way. 

The placers of the side at bat must 

R ULE 43. speedily abandon their bench and hasten 

to another part of the field when byremam- 

ln 8 upon or near it they or any of them would interfere 



38 

with a fielder in an attempt to catch or handle a thrown 
or a batted ball. 

A Fair Hit. 

A fair hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 44. settles on fair ground between home and 
first base or between home and third base 
or that is on fair ground when bounding to the outfield 
past first or third base or that first falls on fair territory 
beyond first or third base, or that, while on or over fair 
ground, touches the person of the umpire or a player. 



RULE 45. 



A Foul Hit. 

A foul hit is a legally batted ball that 
settles on foul territory between home and 
first base or home and third base, or that 
bounds past first or third base on foul territory or that 
falls on foul territory beyond first or third base, or, while 
on or over foul ground, touches the person ,,f i'i,,. umpire 
or a player. 

A Foul Tip. 

A foul tip is a ball batted by the bats- 
RULE 46. man while standing within the lines of his 
position, that goes sharp and direct from 
the bat to the catcher's hands and is legally caught. 

A Bunt Hit. 

„,,, n .-, A blInt i lk is a Ie 2 al 'y batted ball, not 

RULE 47. swung at. but met with the bat and tapped 
slowly within the infield by the batsman. 
If the attempt to bunt result in a foul not legally caught, a 
strike shall be called by the umpire. 

Balls Batted Outside the Ground. 

pule m ^'7":? '• wl , K ' n ? ,,: " ,r ' 1 l,al1 p ass « 

RULE 48. outside the ground or into a stand the um- 
pire shall decide it fair or foul according to 
where it disappears from the umpire's view. 

Sec. 2. A fair hatted ball that goes over the fence or 
into a stand shall entitle the batsman to a home run unless 
it should pass out of the ground or into a stand at a less 
distance than two hundred and thirty-five ("235) feet from 
the home base, in which case the batsman shall be entitled 
to two bases only. The point at which a fence or stand 
is less than 235 feet from the home base shall be plainly 



^■^■■■B 



39 

indicated by a white or black sign or mark for the um- 
pire's guidance. 

Strikes. 
A strike is : 
RULE 49. Section i. A pitched bail struck at by 

the batsman without its touching his bat. 
Sec. 2. A fair ball legally delivered by the pitcher at 
which the batsman docs not strike. 

Sec. 3. A foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the 
batsman has two strikes. 

Sec. 4. An attempt to bunt which results in a foul not 
legally caught. 

Sec. 5. A pitched ball, at which the batsman strikes but 
misses and which touches any part of his person. 

Sec. 6. A foul tip. held by the catcher, while standing 
within the lines of his position. 

An Illegally Batted Ball. 
.hi illegally batted hull is a ball batted by 
RULE 50. the batsman when either or both "f his feet 
are upon the ground outside the lines of the 
batsman's position. 



When Batsman is Out. 

The batsman is out : 
RULE 51. SECTION i. If he fail to take his position 

at the bat in the order in which his name 
appears on the batting list unless the error be discovered 
and the proper batsman replace him before he become a 
runner, in which case, the balls and strikes called must 
be counted in the time "at bat" of the proper batsman. 
But only the proper batsman -hall lie declared out. and 
no runs shall be scored or bases run because of any act 
of the improper batsman. Provided, this rule shall not be 
enforced unless the out be declared before the ball be de- 
livered to the succeeding batsman. Should the batsman 
declared out under this section be the third hand out and 
his side be thereby put out. the proper batsman m the next 
inning shall be the player who would have come to hat 
had the players been put out by ordinary play in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

SEC 2. If he fail to take his position within one minute 
after the umpire has called for the batsman. 



40 

Sec. 3. If he make a foul hit other than a foul tip, as de- 
fined in Rule 46, and the ball be momentarily held by a 
fielder before touching the ground ; provided, it be not 
caught in a fielder's cap, protector, pocket or other part 
of his uniform, or strike some object other than a fielder be- 
fore being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he but the ball illegally, as defined in Rule 50. 

Sec. 5. If he attempt to hinder the catcher from fielding 
or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of the 
batsman's position, or in any way obstructing or interfer- 
ing with that player. 

Sec. 6. If. while first base be occupied by a base runner, 
the third strike be called on him by the umpire, unless 
two men are already out 

Sec. 7. If, while attempting a third strike, the ball touch 
any part of the batsman's person, in which case base run- 
ners occupying bases shall not advance as prescribed in 
Rule 55, Section 5. 

Sec. 8. If, before two hands are out, while first and 
second or first, second and third bases are occupied, ln- 
hit a fly ball, other than a line drive, that can be handled 
by an infielder. In such case the umpire shall, as SOO 
the ball be hit, declare it an infield or outfield hit. 

Sec. 9. If the third strike be called in accordance with 
Sections 4 or 5 of Rule 49. 

Sec. 10. If he steps from oik- batsman's box to the 
other while the pitcher is in his position ready to pitch. 



BASE RUNNING RULES. 

Legal Order of Bases. 

The Base Runner must touch cad: 
RULE 52. in legal order, viz., hirst, Second, Third 
and I ionic Bases; and when obliged to re- 
turn while the ball is in play, must retoucli the ba 1 
bases in reverse order. He can only acquire the righl 
by touching it, before having been put out, and 
then be entitled to hold such base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order, or has been legally forced 
to vacate it for a succeeding base runner. Howevi 1 
base runner shall scon a run to count in the game ahead 
of the base runner preceding him in the batting order, if 
there be such preceding base runner who has not been put 
out in that inning. 



I 'V 



41 

When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 

The batsman becomes a base runner : 
RULE 53. Section i. Instantly after he makes a 

fair hit. 

Sec. 2. Instantly after "Four Balls" have been called by 
the umpire. 

Sec. 3. Instantly after "Three Strikes" have been de- 
clared by the umpire. 

Sec. 4. If, without making any attempt to strike at the 
ball, his person or clothing be hit by a pitched ball unless, 
in the opinion of the umpire, he plainly make no effort 
to get out of the way of the pitched ball. 

Sec. 5. If the catcher interfere with him in or prevent 
him from striking at a pitched ball. 

Sec. 6. If a fair hit ball strike the person or clothing of 
the umpire or a base runner on fair ground. 

Entitled to Bases. 

The base runner shall be entitled, with- 
RULE 54. out liability to be put out, to advance a base 
in the following cases : 

SECTION t. If, while the batsman, he becomes a base 
runner by reason of "four balls" or for being hit by a 
pitched ball, or for being interfered with by the catcher in 
Striking at a pitched ball, or if a fair hit' ball strike the 
person or clothing of the umpire or a base runner on fair 
ground. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire awards to a succeeding batsman a 
base on four balls, or for being hit by a pitched ball, or 
being interfered with by the catcher in striking at a pitched 
ball and the base runner be thereby forced to vacate the 
base held by him. 

SEC. .?. If the umpire call a "Balk." 

Sue. 4. If a ball delivered by the pitcher pass the catcher 
and touch any £« 1 building within ninety (90) feet 

"i tin home base. 

Sec. 5. If he be prevented from making a base by tin- 
obstruction of a fielder, unless the latter have the ball in 
his hand ready to touch the base runner. 

SEC. 6. [f the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with 
his cap, glove or any part of his uniform, while detached 
from its proper place on his person, the runner or runners 
shall he entitled to three bases. 

See. 7. If a thrown or pitched ball strike the person or 
clothing of an umpire on foul ground the ball shall be 



42 

considered in play and the base runner or runners shall be 
entitled- to all the buses they can make. 

Returning to Bases. 

The base runner shall return to his base 
RULE 55. without liability to be put out: 

Section i. If the umpire declares any foul 
not legally caught. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declares an illegally batted ball. 

Sec. ;,. If the umpire declares a dead hall, unless it be 
also the fourth unfair ball, and he be thereby forced to take 
the next base, as provided in Rule 54, Section 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire inter- 
fere with the catcher in an attempt to throw or the umpire 
be struck by a ball thrown by the catcher or other fielder 
to intercept a base runner. 

Sec. 5. If a pitched ball at which the batsman strikes 
but misses, touch any part of the bat-man'-, person. 

Sec. 6. // ///c umpire be struck by a fair hit ball before 
touching a fielder: in which ease no base shall lie run 
unless necessitated by the batsman becoming a base runner, 
and no run shall be scored unless all the bases arc occupied. 

Sec. J. If the umpire declares the batsman or another 
runner out for interference. 

Sec K In any and all of tlte.se cases the base runner is 
not required to touch the intervening bases in returning to 
the base he is leg-illy entitled to. 

When Base Runners are Out. 

The base runner is out : 

RULE 56. Section i. If. after three strikes have 

been declared against him while the batsman. 

the third strike ball be not legally caught and he plainly 

attempts to hinder the catcher from fielding the ball. 

SEC. 2. If. having made a fair hit whili bal man, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a fielder before touch- 
ing the ground or any object other than a fielder; pro- 
vided, it be not caught in a fielder's hat, cap, protector, 
pocket or other part of his uniform. 

Sec. 3- !•'• when the umpire has declared "Three 
Strikes" on him while the batsman, the third strike ball 
be momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground; provided, it be not caught in a fielder's cap, 
protector, pocket or other part of his uniform, or touch 
some object other than a fielder before being caught. 



43 

Sec. 4. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a fielder before he shall have 
touched first base. 

Sec. 5. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with 
any part of his person before such base runner touch first 
base. 

Sec. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from 
home base to first base, while the ball is being fielded to 
first base, he run outside the three foot lines, as defined 
in Rule 7, unless he do so to avoid a fielder attempting to 
field a batted ball. 

Sec. 7. If, in running from first to second base, from 
second to third base, or from third to home base, he run 
more than three feet from a direct line between a base 
and the next one in regular or reverse order to avoid be- 
ing touched by a ball in the hands of a fielder. But in case 
a fielder be occupying a base pinner's proper path in 
attempting to field a batted ball, then the base runner shall 
run out of direct line to the next base and behind said 
fielder and shall not be declared out for so doing. 

Sec. <S. If he fail to avoid a fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, in the manner described in Se and 7 

of this rule, or in any way obstruct a fielder in attempting 
to field a batted ball, or intentionally interfere with a 
thrown ball; provided, that if two or more fielders attempt 
to field a batted ball, and tin- base runner conic in contact 
with one or more of them, the umpire shall determine 
which fielder is entitled to the benefit of this rule, and 
shall not decide the base runner out lor coming in contact 
with a fielder other than the one the umpire determines 
to be entitled to field such batted ball. 

Sec. o. If at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless some 
part of his person be touching the base he is entitled to 
occupy; provided, however, that the ball be held by the 
fielder after touching him, unless the base runner delib- 
erately knock it out of his hand. 

Sec. 10. If, when a fair or foul hit ball (other than a 
foul tip as defined in Rule 46) be legally caught by a 
fielder, such ball be legally held by a fielder on the base 
occupied by the base runner when such ball was batted, 
or the bast- runner be touched with the ball in the hands 
of a fielder, before he retouch such base after such fair or 



44 

foul hit ball was so caught ; provided, that the base runner 
shall not be out in such case, if, after the ball was legally 
caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the pitcher 
before the fielder hold it on said base, or touch the base 
runner out with it; but if the base runner, in attempting 
to reach a base, detach it from its fastening before being 
touched or forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

Sec. ii. If, when the batsman becomes a base runner, 
the first base, or the lirst and second bases, or the first, 
second and third bases be occupied, any base runner so 
occupying a base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, and 
may be put out at the next base in the same manner as in 
running to first base, or by being touched with the ball in 
the hands of a fielder at any time before any base runner 
following him in the batting order be put out, unless the 
umpire should decide the hit of the batsman to be an in- 
field fly. 

Sec. 12. If a fair hit ball strike him before touching 
a fielder, and, in such case, no base shall he run unless 
necessitated by the batsman becoming a base runner, but 
no run shall be scored or any other base runner put out 
until the umpire puts the ball back into play. 

Sec. 13. If, when advancing bases, or forced to return 
to a base, while the ball is in play, he fail id touch the 
intervening base or bases, if any, in the regular or reverse 
order, as the case may be, he may be put out by the ball 
being held by a fielder on any base he failed to touch, or 
by being touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder 
in the same manner as in running to first base; provided, 
that the base runner shall not be out in such case if the 
ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher before the 
fielder hold it on said base or touch the base runner with it. 

Sec. 14. If, when the umpire call "Play," after the sus- 
pension of a game, he fail to return to and touch the base 
he occupied when "'lime" was called before touching the 
next base; provided, the base runner shall not be out, in 
such case, if the ball be delivered to the bat by the 

Eitcher, before the fielder hold it on said base or touch the 
ase runner with it. 
Sec. 15. If with one or no one out and a base runner on 
third base, the batsman interferes with a play being made 
at home plate. 

Sec. 16. If he pass a preceding base runner before such 
runner has been legally put out he shall be declared out 
immediately. 



45 

Overrunning First Base. 

Sec. 17. The base runner in running to first base may 
overrun said base after touching it in passing without in- 
curring liability to be out for being off said base, pro- 
vided he return at once and retouch the base, after which 
he may be put out as at any other base. If, after over- 
running first base, he attempt to run to second base, before 
returning to first base, he shall forfeit such exemption 
from liability to be put out. 

Sec (8. If. while third base is occupied, the coacher 
Stationed near that base shall run in the direction of home 
lias, cm or near the base line while a fielder is making or 
trying to make a play on a batted ball not caught on the 
fly, or on a thrown ball, ami thereby draws a throw to 
home base, the base runner entitled to third base shall be 
declared out by the umpire for the coacher's interference 
with and prevention of the legitimate play. 

Sec. 19. If one or more members of the team at bat 
stand or collect at or around a base for which a base 
runner is trying, thereby confusing the fielding side and 
adding to the difficulty of making such play, the base run- 
ner shall be declared out for the interference of his team 
mat'; or team mates. 

When Umpire Shall Declare an Out. 

The umpire shall declare the batsman or 
RULE 57. base runner out. without waiting for an ap- 
peal for such decision, in all cases where 
such player be put out in accordance with any of these 
rules, except Sections 13 and 17 of Rule 56. 

Coaching Rules. 

The coacher shall be restricted to coach- 
RULE 58. ing the base runner only, and shall not 
address remarks except to the base runner, 
and then only in words of assistance and direction in run- 
ning bases, lie shall not, by words or signs, incite or try 
to incite the spectators to demonstrations, and shall not 
use language which will in any manner refer to or reflect 
upon a player of the opposite club, the umpire or the spec- 
tators. Not more than two coachers, who must be players 
in the uniform of the team at bat, .shall be allowed to oc- 
cupy the space between the players' and the coachers' lines, 
one' near first and the other near third base, to coach base 
runners. If there be more than the legal number of coach- 



46 

ers or this rule be violated in any respect the umpire must 
order the illegal coacher or coachers to the bench, and if 

his order be not obeyed within one minute, the umpire 
shall assess a fine of $5.00 against each offending player, 
and upon a repetition of the offense, the offending player 
or players shall lie debarred from further participation in 
the game, and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 

The Scoring of Runs. 
One run shall be scored every time a 
RULE 59. base runner, after having legally touched 
the first three bases, shall legally touch the 
home base before three men are put ou1 ; provided, how- 
ever, that if he reach home on or during a play in which 
the third man be forced out or be put out before reaching 
first base, a run shall not count. A force-out can be made 
only when a base runner legally loses the right to the base 
he occupies by reason of the batsman becoming a base 
runner, and lie is thereby obliged to advance. 

UMPIRES AND THEIR DUTIES. 

Power to Enforce Decisions. 
The umpires are the representatives of 

RULE 60. the League and as such are authorized and 
required to enforce each section of this 
code. They shall have the power to order a player, cap- 
tain or manager to do or omit to do any act which in their 

judgment is necessary to give force and effect to 01 r 

all of these rules, and to inflict penalties for violations of 
the rules as hereinafter prescribed. In order to define 
their respective duties, the umpire judging balls ami strikes 
shall be designated as the "Umpire-in-Chief : the umpire 
judging base decisions as the "Field Umpire. 

The Umpire-in-Chief. 

Section 1. The Umpire-in-Chief shall 
RULE 61. take position back of the catcher; he shall 
have full charge of and be responsible for 
the proper conduct of the game. With exception of the 
base decisions to be made by the Field Umpire, the Umpire- 
in-Chief shall render all the decisions that ordinarily would 
devolve upon a single umpire, and which are prescribed 
for "The Umpire" in these Playing Rules. 

Sec. 2. He shall call and count as a "ball" any unfair 
ball delivered by the pitcher to the batsman. He shall also 



47 

call and count as a "strike" any fairly delivered 1 > n 1 1 which 
passes over any portion of the home base, and within the 
batsman's legal' range as defined in Rule ,;i, whether struck 
at or not by the batsman ; or a foul tip which is caught 
by the catcher standing within the lines of his position, 
within io feet of the home base; or which, after being 
struck at and not hit, strike the person of the batsman; 
or when the ball be bunted foul by the batsman; or any 
foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the batsman has 
two Strikes, provided, however, that a pitch, d ball shall 
not be called or counted a "ball" or "strike" by the um- 
pire until it has passed the home plate. 

Sec. ?. He shall render base decisions in the following 
instances: (i) If the bull is hit fair, with a runnei 
first, he must go to third base to take a possible decision: 
(2) with more than one base occupied, he shall decide 
whether or not a runner on third leaves that base before a 
fix ball is caught; (.?) in ease of a runner being caught 

between third and 'home, when more than one base is 
occupied, he shall make the decision on the runner nearest 
one plate 
Sec. ,,. The Umpire-in-Chief alone shall have authority 
to declare a name forfeited. 

The Field Umpire. 
Section t. The Field Umpire shall take 
RULE 62. such positions on the playing field as m his 
judgment are best suited for the rendering 

of hose di He shall render all decisions at first 

base and second base, and ill! decisions at third base excel'! 

those to be made by the Umpire-in-Chief in » 
with Sec. ,'. Rule 6l. 

Sei . .■ He shall aid the Umpire-in-Chief in every , 
ner in enforcing the rules of the game and. with the w 

Hon of declaring a forfeiture, shall hare equal authority 

with the Umpire-in-Chief in fining or removing from tne 

game flayers who -violate these rules. 

No Appeal From Decisions Based on Umpire's 
Judgment. 

There shall be no appeal from any de- 

RULE 63. cisionof either umpire on the ground that lie 

was not correct in his conclusion as to 

whether a batted ball was fair or foul, a base runner sate 
or out, a pitched ball a strike or ball, or on any other 



48 

play involving accuracy of judgment, and no decision ren- 
dered by him shall be reversed, except that he be con- 
vinced that it is in violation of one of these rules. The 
captain shall alone have the right to protest against a 
decision and seek its reversal on a claim that it is in con- 
flict with a section of these rules. In case the captain does 
seek a reversal of a derision based solelv on a point of 
rules, the umpire making the decision shall, if he is in 
doubt, ask his associate for information before acting mi 
the captain's appeal. Under no circumstances shall either 
umpire criticise or interfere zvith a decision unless asked to 
do so by his associate. 

Duties of Single Umpire 

If but one umpire be assigned, his duties 

RULE 64. and jurisdiction shall extend to all points, 

and he shall be permitted to take his stand 

in any part of the field that in his opinion will best enable 

him to discharge his duties. 

Must Not Question Decisions. 

Under no circumstances shall a captain 
RULE 65. or player dispute the accuracy of the um- 
pire's judgment and decision on a play. 

Clubs Can Not Change Umpires. 

The umpire can not be changed during a 
RULE 66. championship game by the consent of the 
contesting clubs unless the official in charge 
of the field be incapacitated from service by injury or ill- 
ness. 

Penalties for Violations of the Rules. 

SECTION t. In all cases of violation of 
RULE 67. these rules, by either player or manager, the 
penalty shall be prompt removal of the 
offender from the game* and grounds, followed by a j> 
of such suspension from actual service in the club as the 
President of the League may fix. In the event of removal 
of player or manager by either umpire, he shall go din 
the club house and remain there during the progress of the 
game, or leave the grounds: and a failure to do so will 
warrant a forfeiture of the game by the Umpire-in-Chief, 
Sec. 2. The umpire shall assess a fine of $5.00 against 
offending player in the following cases: (1) H 
player intentionally discolor or damage the ball; (2) if 



49 

the player fail to be seated on his bench within one minute 
after ordered to do so by the umpire; (3) if the player 
violate the coaching rules and refuse to be seated on his 
bencli within one minute after ordered to do so by thef 
umpire; (4) if the captain fail to notify him when one- 
player is substituted for another. 

Sec. 3. In cases where substitute players show their 
disapproval of decisions by yelling from the botch, the 
umpire shall first (jive warning. If the yelling continues 
he ■•■hall fine each offender $ro.oo, and if the disturbance is 
still persisted in he shall clear the bench of all substitute 
players; the captain of the team, however, to have the 
privilege of sending to the club house for such substitutes 
as are actually needed to replace players in the game. 

Umpire to Report Violations of the Rules. 

The umpire shall within twelve hours 
RULE 68. after fining or removing a player from the 
game, forward to the president a report of 
the penalty inflicted and the cause therefor. 

Immediately upon being informed by the 
RULE 69. umpire that a fine has been imposed upon 
any manager, captain or player, the presi- 
dent shall notify the person SO fined and also the club of 
which he is a member; and, in the event of the failure of 
the person so fined to pay to the secretary of the League 
(lie amount of '-aid line within five days after notice, he 
shall be debarred from participating in any championship 
game or from sitting on a player's bench during the prog- 
ress of a championship game until such fine be paid. 

When the offense of the player debarred 
RULE 70. from the game be of a flagrant nature, 
such as the use of obscene language or an 
assault upon a player or umpire, the umpire shall within 
four hours thereafter forward to the president of the 
League full particulars. 

Warning to Captains. 
The umpire shall notify both captains be- 
RULE 71. fore the game, ainl in the presence of each 
Other, thai all the playing rules will be 
strictly and impartially enforced, and warn them that fail- 
ure on their part to co-operate in such enforcement will 
result in offenders bring fined, and. if necessary to pre- 
serve discipline, debarred from the game. 



50 

On Ground Rules. 

Section i. Before the commencement of 
RULE 72. a game the umpire shall see that the rules 
governing all the materials of the game are 
strictly observed. 

Sec. 2. In case of spectators overflowing on the playing 
Held, the home captain shall make special ground rules to 
cover balls balled or thrown into the crowd, provided such 
rules be acceptable to the captain of the visiting club. If 
the latter object, then the umpire shall have full authority 
to make and enforce tuck special rules, and he shall 
announce the scope of same to the spectators. 

See. j. In all cases where there arc no spectators on 
the playing held, and where a thrown ball goes into a stand 
for spectators, or over or through any fence surrounding 
the playing held, or into the players' bench (whether the 
ball rebounds into the held or not), the runner or runners 
shall be entitled In two bases. The umpire in awarding 
such liases shall be governed by the position of the runner 
or runners at the time the throw is made. 

Sec. /. The umpire shall also ascertain from the home 
captain whether any oilier special ground rules arc neces- 
sary, and if there be he shall advise the opposing captain 
of their scope and see that each is duly enforced, provided 
they do not conflict with any of these rules and are 
acceptable to the captain of the visiting team. 

Official Announcements. 
The umpire shall call "1'lay' 
appointed for the beginning 
announce "Time" at its legal 
"Game" at its legal termination. 
commencement of the game he shall announce the bat 
icrics. and during the progress of the game shall ami:' 
each change of players. In case of on overflow crowd, he 
shall announce the special ground rules agreed upon, and 
he shall also make announcement of any agreement entered 
into by the two captains to stop play at a specified hour. 

Suspension of Play. 

The umpire shall suspend play for the 
RULE 74. following causes: 

I. If rain fall so heavily as in the judg- 
ment of the umpire to prevent continuing the game, in 
which case he shall note the time of suspension, and should 



RULE 73. 

and declare 



at the hour 
>>f a game, 
interruption 

Prior to the 



51 

fain fall continuously for thirty minutes thereafter he shall 
terminate the game. 

2. In case of an accident which incapacitates him or a 
player from service in the field, or in order to remove 
from the grounds any player or spectator who has violated 
the rules, or in case of fire, panic or other extraordinary 
circumstances. 

3. In suspending play from any legal cause the umpire 
shall call "'rime"; when he calls "Time," play shall h- 
suspended until he calls "I'lay" again, and during the 
interim no player shall he put out, base he run or run be 
scored. "I inn." shall not be called by the umpire until the 
ball be held by the pitcher while standing in his position. 



No 



Field Rules, 
person shall be allowed upon any 



RULE 75. part of the field during the progress of a 
game except the players in uniform, the 
manager of each side, the umpire, such officers of the law 
as may be present in uniform, and such watchmen of the 
home club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

No manager, captain or player shall ad 
RULE 76. dress the spectators during a game except 
in reply to a request for information about 
the progress or state of the game, or to give the name of 
a player. 

Every club shall furnish sufficient police 
RULE 77. force to preserve order upon its own 
grounds, and in the event of a crowd enter- 
ing the field during the progress of a game, and interfer- 
ing with the play in any manner, the visiting club may 
refuse to play until the field be cleared. If the field be not 
cleared within 15 minute-, thereafter, the visiting club may 
claim and shall be entitled to the game by a score of nine 
runs to none (no matter what number of innings has 
been played). 

General Definitions. 
"Play" is the order of the umpire to be- 
RULE 78. gin the game or to resume it after its sus- 
pension. 

"Time" is the order of the umpire to sus- 
RULE 79. pend play. Such suspension must not ex- 
tend beyond the day. 



52 

"Game" is the announcement of the urn- 
RULE 80. pire that the game is terminal 

"An inning" is the term at bat of the 
RULE 81. nine players representing a club in a game 
and is completed when three of such play- 
ers have been legally put out. 

"A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of n 
RULE 82. batsman. It begins when he takes his po- 
sition, and continues until lie is put out 
or becomes a base runner. But a time at bat shall nnt bi 
charged against a batsman win, is awarded fir I ba e by tin- 
umpire for being hit by a pitched ball, or on called balls, or 
when he makes a sacrifice hit, or for interference by the 
catcher. 

"Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required 
RULE 83. by these rules. 

THE SCORING RULES. 

To promote uniformity in scoring cham- 

RULE 84. pionship games the following instructions 

are given ami suggestions and definitions 

made for the guidance of scorers, and tiny are required to 

make all scores in accordance therewith. 



The Batsman's Record. 

SECTION I. The first item iii the tabu- 

RULE 85. lated score, after the player's name and 

position, shall be the number of times he 

has been at bat during the game, but the exceptions made 

in Rule 82 must not be included. 

SEC 2. In the second column shall be set down the runs, 
if any, made by each player. 

Sec. 3. In the third column shall be placed the first base 
hits, if any, made by each player. 

The Scoring of Base Hits. 
Sec. 4. A base hit shall be scored in the following cases : 
When the ball from the bat strikes the ground on or 
within the foul lines and out of the reach of the fielders. 

When a fairdiit ball is partially or wholly stopped by 
a fielder in motion, but such player can not recover himself 
in time to field the ball to first before the striker reaches 
that base or to force out another base runner. 



53 

When the ball be hit with such force to an infielder or 
pitcher that he can not handle ii in time to put out the 
batsman or force out a base runner. In a case of doubt 
over this class of hits, a base hit should be scored and 
the fielder exempted from the charge of an error. 

When the ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder that he 
cannot handle it in time to put out the batsman or force 
out a base runner. 

In all cases where a base runner is retired by being hit 

by a baited ball, unless batted by himself, the batsman 
should be credited with a base hit. 

When a hatted ball hits the pers, m or clothing of the 
umpire, as defined in Rule 5,?, Section 6. 

In no case shall a base hit be scored when a base runner 
is forced out by the play. 

Sacrifice Hits. 

Sec. 5. Sacrifice hits shall be placed in the Summary. 

A sacrifice hit shall he- credited to the batsman who 
when no one is out or when but one man is out, advances 
a runner a base by a bunt hit. which results in the batsman 
being put out before leaching first, or would so result if 
it were handled without error. 

A sacrifice hit shall also be credited to a batsman who, 
when no one is out or when but one man is out, hits a Hy 
ball that is caught but results in a run being scored, or 
would in the judgment of the scorer so result if caught. 

Fielding Records. 
6. The number of opponents, if any, pul out by 

each player shall he set down in the fourth column. Where 

the batsman is given out by the umpire for a foul Btrike, or 
fails to hat iii proper order, or is declared out on third 
bunt strike, the put-out shall be scored to the catcher. In 
• ' 1 of the base runner being declared "out" tor inleriei; 
ence, running out of line, or oil an infield fly, the "out 

l be credited to the plaver who would have made 
lb' plaj bin lor the action of the base runner or the an- 
nouncement of the umpire. 

Sb . 7. I be number of times, if any. each player assists 
in putting out an opponent shall he set down in the tittn 
column. An assi-t should be given to each player wno . 
handles the ball in aiding in a run-out or any other play 01 
the kind, even though In- complete the play by making W 
put out. 



54 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play 
in time to put a runner out. even if the player who could 
complete the play fail, through no fault of the assisting 
player. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player 
who handles or assists in any manner in handling 
bull from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the 
player who makes the put-out, or in case of a thrown 
ball, to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and 
in such a way that a put-out results, or would result if 
no error were made by a team-mate. 

Id be credited to every player who handle: 
the ball in the play which results in a base runner being 
called "out" for interference or for runnii : line. 

double play shall mean any two continuous put-outs 

that take place between the time the ball leaves the pitcher's 
hands until it is returned to him again standing in the 
pitcher s box. 

Errors. 

Sec. & An error shall be given in the sixth column 
for each nnsplay which prolongs the time at bat of the 
batsman or allows a base runner to make one or more 
bases when perfect play would have insured bis being put 
out. But „ base on balls, a base awarded to a batsman by 
being struck by a filched ball, a bulk, „ passed ball or wild 
pitch shall not be included in the sixth column. 

An error shall not be charged against the catcher for a 
wild throw m an attempt to pre.. , ; „less 

the base runner advance an extra bl the error. 

An error shall not be scored ag her or an 

infielder who attempts to complete a double play, unless 
the throw be so wild that an additional base be gained. 

'", advance a base through the failure 

of a baseman to Btop or try to ura t< ly thrown 

'" hu latter shall be charged with an .'rmr and 

not the player who made such throw, provided there was 
■ on tor it If such throw l„- made to second base the 
scorer shall determine whether the M cond b 
shortstop shall be charged with an error. 
, '".'"":'' elder dropping a By but recovering the 

ball in tun;- lo force a runner at ! |, shall be 

exempted from an error, the play being 

out. 



55 

Stolen Bases. 

Sec. 9. A stolen base shall be- credited lo the base run- 
ner whenever he advances a base unaided by a base hit, a 
put out, a fielding or a battery error, ubject to the follow- 
ing except 

In event of a doftble or triple steal being attempted, 
where either runner is thrown out, the other or others 
shall not be credited with a stolen bast. 

In event of a bast- runner being touched out after sliding 
over a base, he shall not be regarded aa having stolen the 
base in question, 

In event of a base runner making his start to steal a base 
prior to a battery error, he shall be credited with a stolen 

In even! of a palpable nuil'f of a ball thrown by the 
■ r, when the base runner is clearly blocked, the 
Ider making the muff shall !>'■ charged 1 with an error 
and the base runner shall not be credited with a stolen 

Definition of Wild Pitch and Passed Ball. 

See. to. . I wild pitch is a legally delivered ball, so high, 
low or wide of the flute that the catcher cannot or dues 
not stop and control it with ordinary effort, and as a result 
the batsman, who becomes a base runner on such filched 
ball reaches first base or a base runner advances. 

■ I fussed ball is a legally delivered ball that the catcher 
should hold or control with ordinary effort, but his failure 

'" do SO enables the batsman, who nes a base runner 

"ii such filched ball, to reach first base or a base runner 
to advance. 

The Summary. 
The Summary shall contain: 
RULE 86. Section i. The score made in each in- 

ning 01' the game an. I the total runs of each 
in the game. 
Sec. .-. The 

Sa . .,. 1 be 

S*c ;. 11,,. number of two-base hits, 

S .«C. 6 The number of three-base bits, if any, made by 
ea cb player. 



number of stolen bas.s, if any, by each 
number of sacrifice hits, if any, made by 
number of sacrifice flies, if any, made by 
if any, made by 



56 

Sec. 7. The number of home runs, if any, made by each 
player. 

Sec. 8. The number of double and triple plays, if any, 
made by each club and the players participating in same. 

Sf.c. 9. The number of innings each pitcher pitched in 

Sec. 10. The number of base hits, if any, made off each 
pitcher and the number legal at bats scored against each 
pitcher. 

Sec. 11. The number of times, if any, the pitcher strikes 
out the opposing batsmen. 

Sec. 12. The number of times, if any, the pitcher gives 
bases on balls. 

Sec. 13. The number of wild pitches, if any, charged 
against the pitcher, 

SEC. 14. The number of times, if any. tin- pitcher hits a 
batsman with a pitched ball, the name or names of the 
batsman or batsmen so hit to be given. 

Sec. 15. The number of passed balls be each catcher 

Sec. to. The time of the game. 

Sec. 17. The name of the umpire or umpires. 



57 
Index to Rules 



TO LAY OFF TUB FIELD. Sec. 

The ground 

Diamond ot infield 

Catcher's lines 

Foul lines 

Player*' lines 

Coachers' linos 

Three-foot line 

Batsman's lines 

Pitcher's plate 

Slope of lnlield from pitcher's plate 2 

The bases 2 

Material of 

The home base — shape ami size of 1 

Materia 1 of 

Marking the lines — material of 

The ball 

Weight and size l 

Make to be used 1 

Number to bo delirered to umpire 2 

To be replaced if rendered unit to? play 2 

Return of those batted or thrown out of ground 2 

Alternate when to be placed in play 3 

Penalty for Intentional discoloring 4 

Furnished by home club 5-0 

The bat — material and size of 

TUB PLAYEBS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of players in the game 

Players' positions 

The pitcher's position 

Must not mingle with spectators 

Uniforms and shirrs 

Size and weight of gloves 

Players' benches ■ 1 

Umpires not to wait fur notice from captains 



THE REGULATION GAME. 

Time of commencing championship games 

Number of innings 

Termination of game 1 

Termination of game before completion of fifth Inning 

Extra-innings game 

Drawn game 

Callpd game 

Forfeited game 

Failure of a Clnb to appear 

Refusal of a club to continue play 

Failure of a club to resume play 

Resorting to dilatory tactics 

Wilfully violating roles 

Disobeying order to remoTS player 

Less than nine players ••• 

Resumption after rain 

If field be not cleared in fifteen minutes 

When groundkeeper is under umpire's control 

Second gS t" begin ten minutes after completion of 

first 

linpitv lo make written report of forfeiture 

No game 

Substitutes 

May take place of player al any time 

Base runner — consent of opposing captain necessary... 



2-3 



!l 
HI 

'i 

2 

3 



Rule. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

8 

10 

12 

10 

11 

13 

14 

14 

11 

11 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

IS 



16 
17 

ii, :in 
18 
111 
20 
21 
■-'1 



22 
22 
22 

27 

23 
21 
■>-, 

26 
26 
36 

26 
26 
26 

sa 

26 

-a; 

77 
28 

26 
26 

27 
28 
28 
28 



58 



Bee 

Notifying umpire of substituted player, umpire to notify 

Bpectfl l'ir« \ 4 

Choice of Innings — fitness of field for play 

Pitching rules: 

Delivery of the bail to hat 

A fairly delivered hull ,'"_' 

An unfairly delivered ball ...'.'.' 

Penalty tor delay by throwing to buses !!!!!"' 

Penalty for delay in delivery t-. batsman " o 

Shifting pitcher to another position .'..'.'." 

Balking: 

Failure to deliver ball after making motion., i 

Failure to step toward base before throwing 2 

Delivery of hall while foot Is back .if plate 
Delivery of hull while not facing batsman.!!!! 
Motion to deliver hall while not in position 

Delaying game by holding ball S 

notion to pitch without having hull -J 

Any habitual motion without delivery of bali'to'hut" x 
Delivery of hull while catcher Is outside of his linen" a 

Dead ball— hitting batsman In position nis lines.. » 

Ball not in play " ' 

Hall in play— thrown or pitc 1 ball striking' pVrson' 'or " 

clothing ol umpire on foul ground 7 

Block halls: * ' 

Touched or stopped by person not in game 1 

Umpire to declare Mock i 

Base runners to stop under certain conditions. !!!!!!! ! 3 

Tin; BATTING RULES. 

Batsman s position 

Order of batting 

First batsman in ouch Inning....... 

Players of side at hub belong on bench 

^SiaVm™, 1 '.'."' '' f " r '™l'^'."'. a ,onor ' or " 

A till bit" 1 '" '"''"'' '" , "" v '' : ' t 'in'tl-rfen-nce wl'ti, n'c'lile'r'. '. ! 

A foul bit .'.'.'".....'.'..'..'.. 

A foul tip 

A bunt hit 

Infield By— definition of '. ; 

Balls batted outside ground: 8 

Fair hit over fence or Into stand. 1 

Fair or foul where last s,,.„ by umpire 1 

Batsman entitled to home run i 

Strikes: * 

Ball struck at by batsman.. , 

Fair bull not struck nt.. i 

F ° U strike,'"'. . ° , "'! : ' U . ."" «>'«nli-»«' batsman' 'his' 'two 

Attempt to bunt resulting" iii foul 2 

Missed strike but which louche, batsman r, 

Foul tip belt , oarsman 5 

Illegally batted bull .'..'.'.'.'..'" 

THE BATSMAN IS OUT. 
If he fall to take position In proper turn 1 

If be fall to take position within one minute i 

!. „:: Bas^ SLttJB?. ':':".'"' *»« Sa- **&: i 

If he Interfere with catcher i 

If. with first base occupied, three strl'k'es'are' 'called '.! !!!!! 6 



Rule. 

28 
29 

:io 
81 
32 
88 
88 
88 

34 
34 
34 
34 
.11 
31 
M 
34 
34 
38 
38 



37 
37 
37 



38 
39 

■10 
41 

42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
M 

48 
4* 

48 

49 
49 

49 
49 

49 
49 

M 



r.i 
Bl 
Bl 

Si 
Bl 



59 

Sec. 
If. while Attempting third strike, bull touch his person.... 7 

if. before two in-.- out, be hits infield fly 8 

If third strike is called in accordance with Bee. 4 or ."• of 

Bnle 49 9 

if be step from one box to other to 

TUB BA8B-RDNNING BULBS. 

I*epal order of bases 

Not to fore in ti rii- r preceding 

Itatsmiin i runner: 

After he makes fuir liit 1 

After fo.ir hulls are called 2 

After three strikes are called 3 

if in- be hit by pitched hall 4 

if catcher Interfere with him 5 

If fair liil strike umpire or base runner..... 6 

Untitled to bases (without Uablllt] to !«■ pal out) 

If ii in i mr Lulls 1 

if umpire award bataman fust base for being hit by 

pitched hull l 

If umpire award bataman first bate for Interference of 

catcher 1 

If hall hit person or clothing of umpire on fair ground i 

If umpire award next batsman first has. 2 

if umpire call a "balk" :i 

If pitched hall pass catcher and hit fence or building 

within ninety feet ' 

If prerented from advancing by fielder's obstruction.. 5 
ir fielder atop or catch ball illegal!] tie- runner or 

runnels are entitled to three huses 8 

Returning to bases (wlthoul liability to he put ■ 

If umpire declare any foul not legally caught.. l 

If umpire declare Illegally hulled hull '-' 

If umpire declare dead hull :i 

If umpire Interfere with catcher or throw I 

If pit' icbea hut Sinn n •* 

If umpire is struck by fair hit hall '_> 

if umpire culls batsman or runner out for Interference i 

When not required to touch intervening bases s 

Bsbc runners are out : 

Attempt to binder catcher after three strikes 

Fielder hold fair hit 2 

Third strike held by fielder 

Touched with hull after three strikes * 

Fielder ton ■ ., ,. ahead of runner •> 

Sunning out of three-fool lines J> 

HuuniiiK out of lino after baring reached Brat " 

Failure to avoid fielder In act of fielding bull JJ 

Touched bj fielder baring bail In possession |> 

Hall held on has,, before runner can return "' 

ti' vucflte base bj succeeding runner 1' 

lilt by fulr ball before touching Holder ]- 

Fallure to touch b ler.. .... . 

Failure to return to base held "hen "time" "as called II 

if batsman interfere with play at home plate 

.• preceding base runner !" 

Overrunning first base IL 

r drawing tin"" to plate {[> 

Members "f team islng fielding side i" 

Dmpll ■. irlo.nl appeal for decision 

ng rules .. 

It of r ins 

Definition of a "force out" 



Itllle. 

r.i 
si 

51 
Bl 



r>2 

63 

63 
63 

n:i 
63 
63 
53 

64 

64 

.'I 
54 
r.4 
54 

54 
64 



68 
55 

r.5 



56 

H 
56 
:.<> 
Sfl 
r.fl 
60 
r.c, 
Bfl 
6fl 
M 
M 
r,n 
Bfl 

56 
Bfl 
66 
56 
.",7 
68 
69 



60 

Tin: UMPIRE) AND HIS DUTIES. Sec. 

Power to enforce decisions 

i rmplre In chief and duties 1-2-3- 1 

Field umpire's duties 1-2 

No appeal from decision 

Captain alone has rlghl to appeal on rule construction 

Single umpire's dlllies 

Cannot question umpire's accuracy of judgment 

Cannot change umpire during progress <>f game 

Penalties tor violations 1-2-3 

Umpire to report Bnlng or removal of player within twelve 

hours 

Notifies!] f lines and Mi r payment... 

Umpire's report on flagrant cases 

Warning to captains..... 

Ground rules and materials of Mi.- game 

Official announcements 

Snspensl f play 

FIEI.il RULES. 

Persona allowed on field other than players and umpire 

Spectators shall not be addressed 

Police protection 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

"Play" 

"Time" 

"Game" 

"An inning" 

"A time :i' lull'* 

"Legal" or "legally" - , ,, 

Till-: SCORING RULES (Rule Mi. 

The h;i isiniin's record: 

'limes ill lull 1 

Number of runs •> 

Firsi base hi's fj 

win ii base hits should be credited .' • 

Sacrifice hi is . ... -, 

'Ihe fielding record: 

Number of pui outs, and explanation of ( ; 

Number of assists, and explanation of '*' 7 

Errors, and explanation of s 

Exemption from errors , '' s 

Scorer to determine s 

Si olell I. uses :i 

Definition "f wild pitch and passed hull pi 

The summary: 

The score of each inning mid total runs 1 

The number of Btolen bases o 

The number of sacrifice bits "{ 

The n her of sacrifice dies '' ] ( 

The number of two base hits 5 

The number of three-base bits .,.'. n 

The number of home runs ' 7 

The number of double and triple plays « 

The number of innings each pitcher pitched in t> 

The number of base bits made "if each pitcher in 

The number of strike outs ji 

Tiie number "f bs lis 12 

The number of wild pitches jij 

Th.- n inn her ,,f hi 1 batsmen 11 

The number of passed hulls 1- 

The time ..f ihe game 10 

The name of the umpire or umpires 17 



i;i 
62 
83 

1::: 
c.l 
65 
66 

117 

68 

c,:i 
711 
71 
7-J 
7." 
71 



75 
76 
77 



78 
79 
8U 
81 

Nl' 

s:i 



86 

s:, 
86 

85 

Bg 

sr. 
85 
B6 
86 
B6 
s.-, 

si; 
si; 
86 
B6 
86 
86 
si; 
86 
86 
si; 
si; 
86 
B6 
86 
88 



61 

Special Meeting of the National 

League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at Sinton Hotel, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
June 4, [909. 

Meeting called to order at 1 !"IS P. M. 
Acting President John A. Heydler in chair; Frank 
Cook, stenographer and acting secretary. 
Present : 

Boston — George 1>. Dovey. 

Brooklyn — Chari.es II. Ebbets. 

Chicago — Charles W, Murphy, 

Cincinnati — AUGUST HERRMAN n. 

Pittsburg — Barney Dreyfuss. 

Philadelphia— Wm. J. Shettsline. 

New York — John T. Brush and Ashley Lloyd. 

St. Louis — Absent. 

Reading of minutes of last meeting was dispensed with. 

On motion, the action of the League at the February, 
1909, meeting, held in Chicago, with reference to amending 
Section 10 of the Constitution, was rescinded. 

On motion, a resolution was adopted providing for an 
assessment on gate receipts 10 meet the expenses of the 
League for the current season. 

The League went into executive session to disCUSS the 

status of President Harry 1'. Pulliam, then on an indefinite 
leave of absence for the recovery of his health. 

Mr. Dovey in the chair. 

On motion, the chair appointed Mr. EbbetS and Mr. 

Shettsline a committee of two to meet Mr. Pulliam on his 
arrival in Cincinnati, and to report to the League on the 

condition of his health. 

Adjourned subject to call of the Chair. 

(As result of a League mail vole, Mr. Pulliam, on June 
2l>, n^«j. resumed his duties as President of the League. 1 



62 



Meeting of the Board of Directors 

National League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 



Held at 



itil SeeJbach, Louisville, Ky. 
August J, 1909. 



Following the funeral of the late President of the 
League, Harry C. l'ulliam, a meeting of the Board of 

Directors of the League was convened al 4 o'clock. 

Present: Messrs. B. Dkeyfuss, C. Ebbets, C. W. Mur- 
l'HY and John S. C. DoVKY. 

Mr. Dreyfuss/ chairman ; Mr. Miki-hv. secretary. 

On motion, Mr. John A. Heydler was unanimously 
elected to fill out the unexpired term of the late Mr. 
Pulliam as President of the League. 

On motion, the funeral expenses of the late President 
were ordered paid by the League. The salary for Un- 
balance of Mr. PuUiam's elective term was also ordered 
to be paid by the League. 

A committee consisting of Messrs. Dreyfuss, Herrmann, 
and Murphy, was appointed with power to erect a suitable 
monument over the remains of the late President. 

It was also ordered that all players wear a band of 
mourning and that all flags on League grounds remain at 
half-mast for a period of thirty days. 



63 

Annual Meeting of the National 

League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held nt the Waldorf-Astoria, New York City, 
December 15 to is, inclusive, iooy. 



FIRST DAY, Wednesday, December 15, 1909. 

Meeting called to order at .$:i° P, M. 

('resident John A. Heydler in the chair; Mr. T. M. 
JAMES, stenographer and acting secretary. 

Present: 

John S. C. Dovky and John P, Harris, representing 
the Boston National League Base Ball Company. 

Charles II. Ebbets, Henry W. Medtcus and Charles 
II. Ebbets, Jr., representing the Brooklyn Hall Club. 

Chaki.ks \\". Murphy, representing the Chicago League 
Ball Club. 

VUGUST HERRMANN and Jri.irs Fi.kim iimann, repre- 
senting the Cincinnati Exhibition Company. 

FrED M. KNOWLES and ASHLEY Li.oyii. representing the 

National Exhibition Company of New York. 

Horace S. Focel, representing the Philadelphia Hall 
( ompany. 

BARNEY DREYFUSS and W'll.l. LOCKE, representing the 
Pittsburg Athletic Company. 

M. S. RoBISON, representing the American Base Ball and 
Athletic Exhibition Company of St. Louis. 

(hi calling the nam.- of the Philadelphia Club, the (hair 
read a communication, designating the new officers "t that 
ClUb as follows: HORACE S. FoCEL, president; Frank W. 
ELLIOTT, vice-president; Morris ScheCK, secretary-treas- 
urer. 



64 

The report of the Board of Directors was received and 
approved, carrying with it award of the championship of 
igcxj to the Pittsburg Club. 

President lleydler presented his annual report, which 
was received and ordered spread on the minutes. 

The report of Chairman F.bbets of the Chadwick Memo- 
rial Committee was approved. 

The interest on $5,000 was ordered paid monthly to the 
invalid sister of Harry C. Pulliam, as a tribute to the 
memory of the late President of the League. The sum of 
$100 was also voted to Mr. Pulliam's sister. 

Mr. lleydler retired, and Mr. J. Fleischmann was elected 
chairman. 

'1 he election of a President of the League was infor- 
mally discussed. 

Adjourned to n :.;o A. M., December 16. 

In the evening a banquet was tendered to the League, 
the Base Kail Writers' Association of America and \ isit- 
hlg base ball men, by Mr. Dreyfuss, in honor pf Pittsburg 
winning the roog League and World's Championships. 



SECOND DAY, Thursday, December 16, 1909. 

League called to order by Chairman Fleischmann. 

All clubs present, Mr. Brush and Mr. Lloyd represent- 
ing New York. 

Mr. Ebbets nominated for President Mr. John M. Ward; 
seconded by Mr. Brush. 

Mr. Kobison placed in nomination Mr. Robert W. 
Brown; seconded by Mr. Dreyfuss. 

On roll call. Brooklyn, Chicago, New York and Phila- 
delphia voted for Mr. Ward; the Boston, Cincinnati, Pitts- 
burg and St. Louis clubs voted for Mr. Brown. 

Adjourned until 1 P. M. December 17. 



65 
THIRB DAY, Friday, December 17, 1909. 

Met pursuant to adjournment 
Mr. Julius Fleischmann in chair. 
All rluli-: represented as on previous day. 
The deadlock on the vote for President continued, four 
clubs voting for Mr. Ward and four for Mr. Brown. 
Adjourned until 1 1 .,^0 December r8. 



FOURTH DAY, Saturday, December 18, 1909. 

Met pursuant to adjournment. 
Mr. Julius Fleischmann in chair. 
All clubs represented as on previous day. 
On three roll calls, four clubs continued to vote for Mr. 
Ward for President and four for Mr. Brown. 

Mr. EbbetS presented a communication from Mr. Ward 

withdrawing his name as a candidate. 

Mr. Robison withdrew the name of Mr. Brown. 

Mr. Brush nominated Mr. Thomas J. Lynch, of New 
Britain, Conn., for office of President of the League. 
Seconded by all clubs in rotation, and unanimously elected. 

The acting secretary ca-t the vote of the League for 

Messrs. Brush, Dreyfuss, EbbetS, Murphy and Herrmann 

mbers of tin- Hoard of Directors for the ensuing year. 

Mr. John A. lleydlcr was elected Secretary-Treasurer of 
the League for a term of three years, the necessary amend- 
ment to Section n of the Constitution being carried unani 

inously. 

On motion, all Standing committees held over for rnsu 
ing year. 

On motion, it was ordered that no club carry more than 
25 players during the playing season and not more than 35 
during the off season. 

Section ,i,j of the Constitution was ordered amended so 
as to allow clubs to withdraw requests tor waivers on 
players. 

Adjourned, subject to call of Chair. 



w 

Reconvened Annual Meeting of the 

National League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at Waldorf-Astoria, New York City, 
February 15 to 19, inclusive, 1910. 

FIRST DAY, Tuesday, February 15, ton). 
Called to order 2 : 15 P. M. 

President Thomas J. Lynch in chair; Johm A. Heyd- 

LER, secretary, FWED HaNLON, stenographer. 

Present : 

Boston— John S. C. Dovey. 

Brooklyn— Charles II. Ebbets ami Henry Medicus. 

Chicago— Charles \V. Murphy. 

Cincinnati AUGUST HERRMANN. 

New York— John- T. Brush. 

Philadelphia By proxy held by Brooklyn Club 

Pittsburg— Barney Dreyfuss and Will Locke. 
St. Louis— M. S. Robison. 

The minutes of the first day's session of the December, 
[909, meeting were read and approved 

irman Ebbets of the Schedule Committee presented 

his report. A motion to adopt the form of 

schedule was lost. 

Adjourned until 2 o'clock February 1',. 

SECOND DAY, Wednesday, February 16, ,.. 

Called to order at 3:45 1'. M. 
Clubs represented as on first day. 

A motion to adopt the 154-game form of schedule was 
lost. 

Mr. Ebbets presented report of the Committee on Tele- 

RTHpfa 

Adjourned to February 17. 



67 
THIRD DAY, Thursday, February 17, 1910. 
tailed to order at ,?:-4o P. M. 

Clubs represented as on first day, except Brooklyn voting 
proxy of the St. Louis Club. 

Sec. 10 of Constitution was amended (see this pub- 
lication). 
Adjourned to February iS. 



FOURTH DAY, Friday, February 18, 1910. 

Called to order at ,j P. M. 

Clubs represented as on tirsl day. 

The [54-game schedule was adopted, amended as fol 
lows; that the playing season extend up to and including 
October 15, and that the St. Louis Club be scheduled in 
Cincinnati on three dates instead of conflicting in Chi 

Sees. u, # i_\ 17, i() and 30 of the Constitution wen 
amended 1 see this publication^. 

Adjourned to a !'. M. February 19. 



FIFTH DAY, Saturday, February to, 1910. 
M-t pursuant to adjournment. 

Present ; 

Boston Proxy held by Cincinnati. 
Brooklyn Charles II. Ebbets. 

I hi< ago ' 11 \ki E3 \V. Murphy. 
Cincinnati \r.,i 1 Herrmann, 
New York John T. Brush. 
Philadelphia -Proxy held by Brooklyn. 
Pittsburg— W'11.1. I.oc kk. 
St. Louis Proxy held by Brooklyn. 
.;.;, 39, i_\ i.j, 53, 56, 57, 58 and 64 of the Constitu- 
tion were amended (see this publication). 

1 »u motion of Mr. Brush, the following was unanimously 

adopted "Resolved, That this League is opposed to what 

nominated syndicate ball, and it will not permit a dual 



68 

ownership where one club owner owns or controls another 
club in .this League." 

The following resolution was adopted: 
Resolution in memoriam to Harry C. Pulliatn, Israel 
W. Durham, ami George />'. Dovey, 

"Whereas, in the past year, tin: National League has suf- 
fered an irreparable loss in the demise of HARRY C. 
PULLIAM, its President, and ISRAEL \Y. DURHAM, 
President of the Philadelphia National League Base Ball 
Club, and GEORGE B. DOVEY, President of the Boston 
National League Club, and 

"Whereas, these three men had done much to up build, 
foster and promote the bes( interests of the National Game, 
and, in their passing, the members of the National League 
feel a great loss and are much impressed with the idea that 
such men's memories should live after them, and because 
they feel a personal loss in their death; therefore, be it 

''Resolved, that this resolution of respect to their memory 
be spread upon the minutes of our meeting and a copy 
thereof be forwarded to the relatives of the three Presi- 
dents deceased, to whom this mark of respect is paid." 

February 19, 1910. 

The player limit was fixed at 23 from May 15 to August 
20, and at 35 at all other tine 
Adjourned subject to call of Chair. 



IN MEMORIAM 



^arrp C. 0ulliam 

PRESIDENT NATIONAL LEAGUE 
December, 1902, to July, 1009 



Died July 29, 1909 



IN MEMORIAM 



George B. SDotjep 

PRESIDENT BOSTON CLUB 
December, 1906, to June, 1909 



Died June 19, 1909 



■i^^^M^^^^^MHHBBB^H^BHHi 



IN MEMORIAM 



Jsrael rca. £>url)am 

PRESIDENT PHILADELPHIA CLUB 

MARCH, 1909, TO JUNE, 1909 



Died June 28, 1909 



Officers and Members 

The following is an official list of the Officers of the 
National League of Professional Base Ball flubs and 
Officers of Clubs members thereof for the season of 1910: 



President, 
THOMAS J. LYNCH, 
Rooms 1424-1426 St. James Building, New York City. 
Telephone, 2209 Madison (L01 nee). 

Secretary-Treasurer. 
JOHN A. HEYDLER, 
(Address as abo 

Board of Directors, 
Barney Dreytuss, John T. Bri 

August Herrmann, Charles II. F.prkts. 

hi.ks W. Murphy. 

BOSTON NATIONAL LEAGUE BASE BALL 
■■I PA NY. 
inS Paddock Building. 
JOHN S. C. DOVEY, President and Treasurer. 
PETER !■'. KELLEY, Secretary. 



THE BROOKLYN BALL CLUB, 
Washington Park, Brooklyn, X. Y. 
CHARLES H. EBBETS, President. 

NRY W. Ml D Measurer. 

CHARLES H. EBBETS, JR., Secretary. 



73 
CHE CINCINNATI EXHIBITION COMPANY 

OPERATING 

["HE CIN< IXXATI BASE BALL CLUB. 

Wiggins Block, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

AUGUST HERRMANN, President 

MAX C FLEISCHMANN, Secretary-Treasurer. 

CHICAGO LEAGUE BALL CLUB, 

Chicago, 111. 
CHARLES W. MURPHY, President. 

«'"in Exchange Bank Building. 

CHARLES <i. WILLIAMS. Secretary and Treasurer. 

CHARLES II. THOMAS, Associate Secretary. 

PITTSBURGH ATHLETIC COMPANY, 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

BARNEY DREYFUSS, President 

W. II. LOCK I-:. Secretary. 
<)i<> Farmers' Bank Building. 

PHILADELPHIA BALL COMPANY, 
Stephen t.irard Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

HORACE S. FOGEL, President. 

FRANK W. ELLIOTT, Vice President 

MORRIS SCHECK, Secretary Treasurer. 

WILLIAM J. Sill I I SLINK. Business Manager. 

NATIONAL EXHIBITION COMPANY, 
New York. 

JOHN T. BRUSH, President 
FRED M. KNOWLES, Secretary Treasurer. 

Room 623 St. James Building. 

AMERICAN BASE BALL WD ATHLETIC EXHI- 

P.II [ON COMPANY OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

M. S. ROBISON, P. .-idem and Treasurer. 



74 



Club Lists of Players 

Who Participated in the National League Championship 
Campaign of 1909. 



Willis. V. 0. 
Maddox. N. 
Frock, S. W. 
Monro. Eugene 
i amiiitz. Howard 
Camnlts. Harry 
Powell, win. B. 
Brandom, C II. 
Ici'Vcr. Sjhii 

riiiiiipiK'. ciuis. 



Renlbach, K.I. 
Brown. Mordeoal 
I'tii-stt'r. John 
Overall, <>. 
Ragon, 11. C. I'. 
Schwenc-k. H. <'. 
Krob. P. M. 
rllgglnbotham, I. 
Haserman, /• /.. 
[jundgren, ('. 
Coakley, A. 



Wlltae, George 11. 
Din.k.-. Louis 
Man|iianl. 11. 

Italy. G f .1. 

i raodall. Oils 

W eiliMT. .lakr 

Durham. L. 
Waller. John 
Ames, I •■'■u 
Raymond, a. L. 



Bavldge. i;. a. 
Can! n ell, Thonias 
Bv tag. Bob 
Bushel man 
Dubuc, John 
Spade, i: 

liasj.ar. II. 1.. 

Karger, Bd. 
t 'astJeton, Roy 
Kromroe, A. 
Griffith. I'lurk C. 
Campbell. W. .1. 
Ragon, I). C. I". 
Chappelle. w. II. 

I'linnirliai-I. I'. 

Rowan, J. A. 



PITTSBCBG. 
Manager- -Fred C. Clarke 
Leifield, A. I\ 
Adams. Chas. B. 
Waeker, Chu*. 
Uiirbln, B. 
Absteln. Win. 
MIHer. .1. 1'.. 
Byrne, Robert 
Barbeau. w. .1. 
Rtorke, Alan 

CHICAGO. 
Manager -Frank 1.. Chance 

llas.-r. ('. I '. 
Brott n. Caul 
Cull-. Leouurd 1.. 
I'liam-c. 1'. I.. 
Howard, «;*•". i:. 
Bvers, .1. .1. 
NtetnfeuU. n. 
Tinker, .1",- 
Zimmerman. II. 
Kane. John l'. 

SEW fOBK. 

Manager .Jobs .1. McGraw 

Matli<-u 100, C. 

Klawltter. A. 
Tenney, Fred 
Merkle, F. C. 
Doyle, Can ii-im ■■ 
Devlin, Arthur 
Brldwell. A. II. 
Fletcher. Arthur 
sharer. A. .1. 
Latham, w. a. 

CINCINNATI. 
Vlanager Clark C Griffith 
DiiH.in. B. 
Metcalf, H. E. 
Chasten, I!, i Aeben 

bach ' 
D»lan, ai> In .1. 
Downey. Thomas 
Mvwrey, II. II. 
Egan. R. .1. 
Elian 1; 
Mobilized. 1:. ( . 
I.obert. John 
Johnson, W. 1; 
Uoriarty, \\ . .1. 
Aatry, w. a 
1 1 ii triri 1.-. M. J. 



Abbatlcchlo. 1 .1. 
Wajrner, John II. 
Gibson, ' (eorge 
O'Connor. I'. I\ 

Mm,, 11. M. i:. 
('lark.'. Fred <\ 
l.cacb. Thomas 
Wilson. J. o. 
Hvatt, II. .1. 
Miller, Wi.nl 



l.il. I. -ins. P, 
M. .ran. P. .1. 

Archer, .las. 1*. 

N.'.ilhain, T. .1. 
Shci-kuril. .1. 

Ilufman, Arthur 

Siliuii... F. 
Stanley, J. B. 
Browne, George 
Davidson, w. s. 



Ilerxog, C. I 
Meyers. .1. T. 
Wilson, a. K. 

N. Iil.-i, i;,-,,r^i' 
Kej mour, .1. B. 
Murray. .1. .1. 
MfCormlck. II. 
O'Hara, Wm. 
DeVore. Josh 
Suialgrass, F, 



\v. c. 
Konnlek. Mike 
I'suxtls, s. F. 

II. .III. Clunk 

. larke. 'I hu 

McLeuu. .1 B. 

Ilaken r, B. 

UeM'lu 

I'a rtereon. ' law 

McCahe, Arthur 

\ if. 11. I). 

Mltihell. \i r. 
Miller. Ward 
Hakes. 1: I. 
I'aakert, •;. H. 



Sparks. T. F. 
\ in. Dyke. B. 11. 
Brown, iiias. E. 
Richie, Lewla 
Mm, I,-, Bar] 
Foxen, Win. A. 
MrQlllllnn. George 
Corrldon, Trunk J. 

Mnren. I.. H. 

r, in- 1, ■ski,-, II. 



!'iiii..\|ii:i.i'in \. 

M iv. -i William J. M.i 

S.-milaii. J r it i ilc 
Branafleld, W. E. 
Knnbe, Otto 
Grant. K. I.. 
Iioolnn. M. .1. 
Ward. .1-.,. 
Sheiln, David 
Starr. Chak. \V. 
McDonougb, Ed, 
I main, Chaa. s. 



Mallei. I.. A. 
.laeklllseb. P. 

Proellcb 
Vlagee, S. K. 
OsImii-11. W. 

Detninger, O. C. 

Tilus. John 
Ratea, .li.hu 
Clement, W. O. 



S, null. II. \V. I). 

Hooter, ii.'.,. 11. 
Rueker, 0. N. 
Willi. -Ini. I. K. 
Plnlavaoo. P. 
Fletcher, s. s. 
Pastorlos, J. W. 
Mclntlre. II. 
Dent, E. B. 

Bell. 0. II. 

Knetger, K. 



More, i "i re I 
Rbodea. Chaa. A. 
Beebe, 1'. I.. 
KaUee. II. 
Bernard 

HIgglnbotbam, I. 
Iliririn-. i: 
Itn.kiiinn. L. .1. 
Loudermllk. 0, 
I.nsh. J. ,l,ii C. 
Raleigh. .1. .v. 
Sullivan, II. A. 



BROOKLYN. 

Manager It. G. Lomley. 
Hummel. John K. 

.1 ■■! <l:i ii, 'I'. .1. 
Alpennan. < 'baa. A. 
Lennox, B. 

M. Mlllali. T. 1,. 
M.-Klveen. I 1 . M. 
Meyer, Leie 
Redmond, II. J. 
Bergen, Win. 
linn ii. .1. E. 

ST. I. Ill' IS. 

Manager— Roger p, Rreanahan 

llan It. .In n 

Welter, Steve 
in in.-. Robert 
Barbeao. w. J. 

ihnrli'S, 11. i A.-I.eii- 
Im.-h l 

Mowrej, n. ii. 
Konetcby. Ed. 

SI.. Ike. Alllll 

Hulawltt, it. E. 
. lateen, <'. 
Enrigbt, C. M. 



Marshall. W. K. 
Wheat. '/.. II. 
Sebrlng, .las- D. 

I.mnlev. H. II. 
Kustus. J. 
Clement, w. o. 
Downey, A. C, 
Myers, II. H. 
Cattersoa, T. H. 
Burch, A. w. 



Gilbert, W. O. 
RelUy. Tbomaa II. 
l-hclpa. i:.l J. 
Bllaa, John 
Bresnaban, u>.f,.-r 
Blank 

Brant, Loola 
Shaw, A. I.. 

.lain.". 

Delahaoty, Joe 
Murphy. II -ward 
Kills. George w. 



Miiiiuir.-is 
l.iii.lnniaii. V. A. 
BroWD, ' lias. E. 

Mattern, a. a. 

Gils 

More, I 
Tuckey, Tbomaa 

limns. I I 

Fergnaon, G. C. 

i mils, run.. i. 
Ohappalle W. II. 
Boultea. J. J. 

While Kill, 

McCarthy, Tl omaa 



Kinslle. It. I). 
O'Daj . Henry 
Jonnatone, J. B. 

Klein. W J. 



BOSTON 
Prank Bowermaii 

iey, Wm. 

Rl.-hie. l..» is 
Aulrv. W. A. 
Mi. -an. Uavi.l W. 
Illtchc) . Claode 
Coffey, Juhn 1. 
Iiiihlci.. Win 
SI. in. P. II. 

Sweeney, w. J. 

Sinrr. Chaa. W. 
.1.1/ G.c 
Siner. II. 



I MCIRF.S. 1f« 
Rlgler, iliaii.-s 
Sternberg, Cant 
Cusaek, s. 1' 
Brennan, Win. 



Harry Smiih 

llialialii He. i. 1'. 

Sin i lli. Hunt 
Bowerman, Prank 
Iturlil.n. Wui. 
Shaw , Alfred 
Beck, 1. T. 

]l|-|lllUl"lll. C. 

Becker. H. 

'Ihuinns. R.iy 
Hales. J..I111 
lilehl. B. 
I.ainlll. Will. 

Monro, J. 11. 

Trul.v. Hurry 0. 
Mullen. John 
Kuue. Sleie J. 



76 

National League Committees, 1910 

Constitutional Amendments — August Herrmann, Ioh.n 
T. Brush ami Wiu. Locke. 

Playing Schedule — Chaki.es H. Ebbets, Barney Drey- 
fuss and Thomas J. Lynch. 

Playing Rules— Thomas J. Lynch, John A. Heydler and 
Clark Griffith. 

Uniform Tickets— Charles H. Ebbets, Fred ECnowles 
and Will Locke. 

Telegraph— Charles II. Ebbets, Will Locke and John 
A. Heydler. 



Draf ting-of-Player Law of National 
Agreement 

t Article VI., Section 6.) 
The right of a Minor League Club to its players shall 
he absolute, except that from September i to September 

15 of each year Major League Clubs shall have the privi- 
lege of selecting players from the National Association 
Clubs for the following season, upon payment of $1,000 
for each player so selected from clubs in Class '' \" 
Leagues; $750 tor each player so selected from clubs in 

Class *B" League-.; $500 f,, r oacll pIayt . r gQ M .|,. ot| .,| ,-,. im 
clubs in Class "C" Leagues; and $.500 for each player SO 
selected from dubs of :i lower class, the payments to be 
made in full to the Secretary of the National Association 

through the Secretary of the Commission, at the tune when 
the selection is made, the player to revert to the club from 
which he was selected, if, when released. !„• is no* signed 
within ten days by a club of ;i Major League; provided, 
however, that not more than one player shall be selected 
from any Class "A" Club during any one year. 



77 

Rules and Regulations Governing 

the Contest for the Professional 

Base Ball Championship 

of the World 

And Games Played Between National and American 

League Clubs. 

Approved i>y the National Commission February Hi. lwoj. and 

Adopted i>y the National and American Leagues 

February its. 1908, and as Revised since that 

time and in Force March I, laio. 



Si i tion i 
League and 
League shal 
Professional 



Agreement to Play. 

The pennant winning club of the National 
the pennant winning club of the American 
meet annually in a series of games for the 
Base Ball Championship of the World. 



The Emblem and Memento. 
Ski. _>. The emblem of the Professional Base Ball 
Championship of the World shall be a pennant to be pre- 
sented to the victorious club each year, and an appropriate 
memento, in the form of a button, to be presented to 
each plaver of the victorious club. Both shall be selected 
by the national Commission, The cost of the pennant 
and the buttons shall be paid by the Commission, 

To be Played Under Supervision of National 
Commission. 

3. The games shall be played under the super- 
vision, control and direction of the National Commission. 

When to be Played. 

Sec. 4. The event shall take place at the end of the 
championship season Of each year. Seven games shall 
constitute a complete series. 



78 

Playing Rules Authorized by the National Agreement. 

Sec. 5. The games shall be conducted according to 
the playing rules as provided for by the National Agree- 
ment. 

Where to be Played. 

Sec. 6. The National Commission shall promulgate a 

schedule for the event. Three games shall be scheduled 
in each of the cities of the contesting clubs. The Com- 
mission shall determine by in! where the lii'sl three games 
shall he played. In ease it becomes necessary to play the 
seventh game p. decide the event, the Commission shall 
determine the city in which the game is to 1"- played. 

Representatives of Contesting Clubs and Notice to 
Players. 

Sf.c. 7. The clubs entitled to contest fur the world's 
honor shall he represented by the President of their 
respective leagues and clubs. The Secretary of the \"a 
tional Commission will be required to notify all of the 
players of the contesting teams that they will be held 
amenable by the Commission to all rules governing Base 
Ball and will be subject to discipline regardless of con- 
tracts. 

When to Terminate. Winning Club. 

Sf.c. X. The clubs shall continue to play each day ac- 
cording to the authorized schedule until one of them has 
won four games, when the contest shall end. anil the club 
winning shall be entitled to fly the emblem or pennant of 

the world's championship during the ensuing Base Ball 

sea-nil. and the players thereof shall be permitted to wear 
the memento or button as long as they pleas.'. 

Right to Terminate the Series. 
Sec. 9. The National Commission shall reserve to itself 
the right to terminate the series at any time that it deems 
the interest of Base Ball demands it. and to declare one 

of the contesting club- the winner of the championship 

regardless of previous performano 

Guarantee of Contesting Clubs. 

Sec. 10. Each of the clubs participating in the event 
shall guarantee to the National Commission in such man- 
ner as the latter may prescribe, that they will faithfully 



70 

carry out all of the provisions of these rules and regu- 
lations, ami such others as the Commission may hereafter 

make to govern the games, and that they will not exercise 
an arbitrary right or privilege of abandoning the series 
until it has been completed or the championship deter- 
mined. 

The Umpires. 
Skc. ti. There shall he two umpires, who shall he in- 
vested with the authority and discretion that the playing 
rules confer, and they shall observe the same general 
instructions with reference to maintaining order and disci- 
pline upon the hall field during these contests that govern 
them in the performance of their duties in all other games 
in their respective leagues. 

Umpires — How Selected. 

Sec. ij. The President of the National League and the 
President of the American League shall each select two 
umpires from their respective leagues, ami the umpires so 

chosen shall he assigned to duly and he subject to the 

orders of the Chairman of the National Commission. 



Compensation of Umpires. 

SEC. i.v The compensation of the umpires 
fixed I ■ \ the National Commission. 



shall be 



Expenses — How Adjusted. 

Skc. 14. The expenses of the National Commission 
pertaining to these games, the salaries of the umpires, and 
other miscellaneous and contingent expenses in connection 

therewith, shall he paid out of the funds to he received 

by the Commission from these games. Should these funds 

prove insufficient for this purpose, the balance shall he 

paid out of the regular funds of tin' Commission, and 

should there he a surplus in these funds it shall he cred 

iied each year to the regular Funds of the Commission. 
All other expenses of both cluba such as hotel hills and 
traveling expenses, balls, advertising, policing of grounds, 

ticket sellers and takers, incidentals, etc.. shall he paid by 

the club incurring the same. Should any difference arise 

at any time as to the latter expense, tne same shall he 
submitted to the Commission for adjudication, ami their 

finding shall he conclusive, 



80 

Constitutional Rights of the Clubs. 
Sec. 15. Each contesting club shall preserve its consti- 
tutional rights during games played upon its own grounds 
with reference to the conduct of its business affairs in 
connection therewith, but the visiting club shall also be 
allowed its inherent rights and whatever representation 
and facilities it may require to properly protect the in- 
terests of the club and its players. Provided, however. 

that the captain of the home team should not he accorded' 
the privilege to determine whether the grounds are fit. 
This authority will he delegated to the umpires. If they 
fail to agree, the umpire whose turn it is to officiate behind 
the plate will decide as to the condition of the ground. 

Rates of Admission. 

SEC i'i. 'I he rales of admission and the conditions 
.-..Mining the same shall he fixed by and he under the 
control of the National Commission. 



Division of Receipts. 

Sec. 17. The receipts from the games shall he divided 
as follows : 

O) I'en per cenl of the gross receipts from all games 
shall he paid to the National Commission. 

(2) Sixty p.r cent of the balance from the first four 
games shall form a pool for the players of the two Lams 
to he divided sixty per cent to the winner and forty per 
cent to the loser of the contest. 

(3) After the ten per cent deductions for the Commis- 
sion and the sixty per cent, which forms the players' pool 
from til.' firsl four games, the balance of the gross re 

ceipts shall he divided equally between the two dubs 

1 '""' sunounl to be paid int.. the players' pool as 
provided by this section, shall he paid to the Commission 

and the same shall he distributed to the players through' 
the Secretary of the Commission. 

Adjustment of Salaries After the Contract Season. 
SEC. 18. In the event that tlie schedule for a world's 
championship serfes extends beyond the player's contract 
season, then the salaries of the players who properly 
belong to the contesting clubs shall continue, at the con- 
tract rate, to the end of the series of games scheduled, 
although only four or more games be played. 



^^■■I^^^^^B 



81 

Free List Suspended. 

Sec. [9. The free list shall be suspended during the 
contest, except to representatives of the press and club 
officials of the two leagues. 

Time of Presentation of Pennant and Buttons. 

Sec. jo. The pennant and buttons shall be presented to 
the victorious club and its players, each year, by the Na- 
tional Commission, who are authorized to arrange for all 
1 if iln d( tails of such iir.--.enia: ii 

Disputes to be Settled by the Commission. 
SEC. 21. All questions arising out of the playing for 

the world's championship not provided for herein, nor 

'".-red by the Playing Rules, shall be dealt with and 
decided by the National Conimissii.il. 

All Clubs to Agree to These Conditions. 

Sec 22. All clubs «.f both leagues hereby agree abso 
lately to conform strictly n« all the articles of these rules, 

and in an ca 1 QOl herein provided for to conform to 

the decisions of the National Commission. 

Rules to Apply to Other Games. 

Ski. _',( These same rules shall apply to all other 
gam. between National and American I ■ 

chilis upon application being made to die National Coin 

mission, excepting Section _>, it being understood that 

mementos to the players of the victorious learn, as well 
as the pennant to he given to the victorious club, shall 
only apply to the World's Series. \ll players sha 
paid at their contract price for all games of litis chat 
that they are obliged to play after the expiration of their 

contrai I 

Players to be Notified. 

Sec 24. After the adoption of this til by the 

National and American Leagues, c.pies of the same 

epared by th< 1 and sent to the 

President of each club, who shall, on or before the 10th 
of March of each year, mail a copy to each player of 
his club. 



82 
National League 

STANDING OF CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 



Clubs. 



Pitts. Chic. N.Y. Cin. Phila. Bkln. St.L. Bos. Won. P.C. 



Pittsburg 

Chicago 

New York 1 

( 'inrinnati .... 

Philadelphia 7 

Brooklyn 4 

St. Louis 

Boston 





13 


11 


15 


IS 


18 


18 


20 


110 


724 


•J 




11 


16 


16 


16 


15 


21 


104 


680 


11 


ii 




13 


12 


15 


16 


14 


93 


,601 


1 


6 


9 




9 


17 


12 


17 


77 


.604 


■1 


6 


10 


12 




11 


16 


12 


71 


.484 


4 


5 


7 


5 


ii 




12 


11 


55 


359 


3 


] 


5 


10 


6 


10 




13 


54 


.355 


1 


1 


8 


5 


10 


11 


9 




45 


.294 



Lost. 



42 49 



76 



98 98 108 Oil 
Game forfeited-By Philadelphia to New York, at New York. October 4, 
1909 (second game). 

Games remaining unplayed— At Pittsburg, game of September 23 trans- 
ferred from Boston. At Chicago, name of September 22 with Brooklyn At 
St. Louis, game of September 21, with New York. At St Louis, game of 
September 14, with Pittsburg. At Cincinnati, tie game of September 22, 
with Philadelphia. 

CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS 

1871— Athletics 7S9| 1884 —Providence 750 

1872- Boston 880 1 1886 Chicago. " '770 

1873-Boston 729| 1886— Chicago. ' '726 

1874-Boston 717 1887 Detroit '" '637 

1875-Boslon New y„,k " '641 

1876-Chicago 788 1889-New York '" 659 

1877-Boston 646 1890— Brooklyn ' 'SK 

1878— Boston 888 1891 Boston ' 680 

1879— Providence .. . .702 1892 -Boston ' 680 

1880-Chicag 798 1888- Boston.. 667 

1881-Chicago 687 1894— Baltimore... '695 

1882— Chicago 655 1X95 --Baltimore 669 

1883-Boston 643 1896-Baltimore. . .'. ','. \m 



1897— Boston 

1898— Boston 

1899-Brooklyn.. 
1900-Brooklyn . . 
1901-pii 
1902- Pi. 
1903-Pittsburg.. 
1904— New York. 
1905— New York 
1906— Chicago. . . 

1908-Chicago. . . . 



.795 

.685 
.682 

.603 
.647 
711 
.650 
.693 

.765 

.643 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. H Tfl 

Wagner. Pittsburg 137 495 gg iw 2( , 

Mitchell. Cincinnati 115 523 83 162 226 

Seymour. New York 73 280 37 87 lis 

Hoblitzel. Cincinnati 142 517 59 159 216 

Wheat. Brooklyn 26 102 15 31 44 

Doyle. New York 144 fl7u 86 ]?2 Zi , 

Snodgrass. New York 22 70 10 21 29 

Hyatt. Pittsburg "49 gj 9 2 31 

Bridwell. New York It.', 476 59 140 161 

Bransficld. Philadelphia 188 527 47 j.vj 19c 

Bates, Philadelphia- Boston. . . 188 a02 70 14g yac 

McCormick. New York 110 IKJ fix 120 156 

Clarke. Pittsburg 182 580 97 15s 205 

Konetehy. St. Louis lj>2 r,7>; 88 165 228 

Hofman, Chicago 153 527 60 160 188 

Hulswitt. St. Louis 77 289 21 

Hummel, Brooklyn 145 ,'j!2 54 182 197 

J. B. Miller, Pittsburg ISO 560 71 168 222 

" Was substitute batsman in forty games. 



2B.3B.Hlt.SH.SI:. 
39 10 
17 
t 



IT 

a 



4 

1 

23 11 4 

7 3 

27 11 6 

6 1 



27 35 
15 37 



9 14 

29 17 

B 1 

12 81 



23 11 



a 
u 

81 



19 82 

22 17 

21 B7 

8 4 

U :;\ 

4 7 

::i 16 

28 1 1 



PC. 
.339 
.310 
.310 
.308 
.304 
.302 
.300 
.299 
.294 
.292 
.291 
.290 
.287 
.286 
286 
.280 
.280 
.279 



83 



INDIVIDUAL BATTINC 

Name anil Club. (i. A I: I 

Myers, New York 64 220 IS 

Egan, Cincinnati 126 480 59 

Lindamau, Boston 15 22 

Zimmerman. Chicago 47 181 

Wilson, Pittsburg 154 569 64 

Jordan, Brooklyn 95 330 47 

W. D. Seanlan, Brooklyn 19 44 3 

Chance, Chicago 92 321 53 

Burch, Brooklyn 152 601 80 

Storke. Pittsburg-St. Louis 80 292 23 

Magee. Philadelphia 143 522 SO 

Titos, Philadelphia 149 540 88 

Oakes, Cincinnati 113 415 55 

Grant. Philadelphia 154 881 7. 

Kills, Si. Louis 145 575 76 

Ward, Philadelphia 68 184 a 

Devlin. New York 143 491 61 

(iibson. Pittsburg 150 510 42 

Schulte, Chicago 140 538 57 

Beaumont, Boston Ill 407 35 

Thomas, Boston 77 2H1 :'.(; 

Murray, New York 149 570 71 

Maihewson. New York 37 95 9 

Evers. Chicago 126 468 88 

Lennox. Brooklyn 121 

Leach, Pittsburg 161 587 128 

Deininger. Philadelphia 46 169 22 

Abstain, Pittsburg 135 

Evans, St.. Louis 113 488 87 

M.I.. an, Cincinnati 95 824 28 

Tinker, Chicago 143 

A. C Down. v. Brooklyn 19 78 7 

Harmon, St. I/mis 21 51 8 

Sheckard, Chicago 148 525 81 

W. Miller, Clncinnati-Pittsburg 4(1 169 19 

Clement, Brooklyn- Philadelphia 89 

Sleinfel.lt. Chicago 151 

Paskert. Cincinnati 88 

Thos Clarke. Cincinnati 17 52 8 

Lumley, Brooklyn 52 172 18 

A. 8. Shaw, St. Loiiia 92 331 45 

Phelps, St Louis 

Alperman, Brooklyn H« 420 86 

Becker, Boston 152 

Sehlel, New York 89 279 25 

Crandall, New York 30 41 4 

.ban. St. Louis 69 234 27 

Sweeney, Boston 138 493 45 

Bhean, Philadelphia-Boston, I'M 

r, Cincinnati 117 446 73 

Grahar, si 267 27 

Lush, St. Louis 45 92 1 

Koth. Cincinnati 52 117 12 

A. Wilson. New York 17 

Charles. Cincinnati-St. Louis.. 112 382 36 

OHara, New York Ill 360 48 

. New York 98 

Knabe, Philadelphia in 402 40 



(Continued). 

11. TB.2B.3B.HE 

i;i 84 10 6 1 

132 158 14 3 2 

6 6 

50 63 9 2 
156 213 22 12 4 

90 12S 20 3 3 

12 17 5 
88 112 16 4 

163 198 20 6 1 

79 93 10 2 

141 208 33 14 2 
146 189 22 6 3 
112 141 10 5 3 
170 199 18 4 1 
154 191 10 9 3 

49 61 8 2 

180 165 19 8 

185 184 26 9 2 

142 192 16 11 4 
107 126 11 4 

74 85 9 10 

150 210 15 12 7 

25 34 4 11 

122 156 19 6 1 

111 156 18 9 2 

168 216 29 8 6 

44 53 9 

188 176 20 10 1 

164 17 6 2 

88 106 12 2 2 

182 192 26 11 4 
20 21 10 

13 14 1 
134 176 29 5 1 

48 50 3 2 

mi 8 4 

183 178 27 6 2 

51 96 7 4 
13 20 3 2 
43 57 8 3 
82 114 12 7 2 
76 91 18 1 

104 160 19 ti 1 

188 188 16 6 6 



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120 148 19 3 1 

92 120 13 6 1 

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,.i 76 6 3 

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til 106 9 3 

s:, 108 9 3 1 

108 8 2 3 

94 113 13 3 



SII SB. 


PC 


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18 


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27 


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14 


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.261 


4 


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21 


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.260 


18 


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.269 


10 


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89 


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.256 


1 


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.256 


4 





.255 


M 


15 


.255 


3 


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.266 


19 


ll 


.254 


81 


22 


.252 


11 


28 


.251 


6 


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.250 


II 


1 


.25(1 


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16 


.248 


lo 


7 


.248 


11 


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.248 


85 


21 


.246 


11 


4 




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.244 


7 


11 


.211 


9 


26 


.243 


17 


17 


.243 


3 


64 


.240 


16 


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,289 


1 


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.289 


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.238 


9 


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.238 


11 


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.236 


11 


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.235 


21 


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84 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING- 

Name ami Club. G. AB. R. 

Dahlen, Boston 57 197 22 

Downey. Cincinnati 119 416 39 

Barbeau. Pittsburg-St. Louis.. 129 525 83 

Archer. Chicago 80 261 31 

Abbaticchio, Pittsburg 23 87 13 

Overall. Chicago 38 96 7 

Wilhelm. Brooklyn 22 57 1 

Hunter, Brooklyn 39 123 8 

Byrne, St. Louis-Pittsburg 151 589 92 

Dooin. Philadelphia 140 468 42 

Maddox, Pittsburg 31 67 6 

Getz, Boston 40 148 6 

Bliss. St. Louis :i2 118 12 

Doolan, Philadelphia 147 493 39 

Moran. Chicago 74 246 18 

Starr, Philadelphia-Boston 62 219 16 

Fletcher, Mew York 29 98 7 

Joe Delahanty, St. Louis Ill 411 28 

Huggins. Cincinnati 46 159 18 

I. .U-it. Cincinnati 122 425 50 

Bowerman. Boston 27 99 6 

McMillan, Brooklyn lux 87S u 

Foxen. Philadelphia 18 24 3 

Stem. Boston 68 245 13 

Iiigginbotham, St.L.-Chicago. . 22 29 1 

Ferguson, Boston 36 73 2 

Marshall. Brooklyn 47 149 7 

Mowrey, St Louis-Cincinnati.. 48 144 18 

Wiltse, New York 37 

Howard Murphy. St. Ivouis 19 60 3 

Osteen, St. Louis 16 45 6 

McElveen, Brooklyn 67 258 22 

Beck, Boston 88 884 2u 

Howard, Chicago 57 203 25 

Autrey, Boston-Cincinnati 70 232 19 

Leifield, Pittsburg 32 73 2 

Fromme. Cincinnati 37 94 8 

Merkle, New York 71 236 15 

Hig^ins, St. Louis 16 21 1 

Corridon, Philadelphia 27 59 4 

Coffey, Boston 73 257 21 

born, Philadelphia 54 189 14 

Herzog, New York.. 38 130 16 

Sbal't-r. New York 31 84 H 

M. Brown, Chicago 50 125 i:i 

kilchey, Boston 25 87 4 

Mclntire, Brooklyn 32 76 9 

Pneeter, Chicago 29 88 

Smith, Boston 31 113 y 

Mattern, Boston 47 101 4 

Dubuc, Cincinnati 19 18 1 

Beebe. St. Louis 44 108 4 

Leever. Pittsburg 19 24 2 

Bell. Brooklyn S3 90 5 

White. Boston 23 60 3 

Kroh, Chicago 17 40 4 

Richie, Philadelphia-Boston ... 33 60 1 

Marnuard, New York 29 64 3 



-(Continued), 












H. 


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INDIVIDUAL BATTING 

Name anil ('Ink 0. AH. R. 

Raymond, New York 39 89 4 

Kustus. Brooklyn SO 178 12 

Campbell. Cincinnati 3D 43 1 

Reulbach, Chicago 35 86 3 

Sparks, Philadelphia 24 36 

Bergen, Brooklyn 112 346 16 

Tuckey, Boston 17 2ft 1 

H. Camnitz. Pittsburg 41 87 8 

Willis. Pittsburg 39 103 6 

Stanley, Chicago 16 52 4 

Melter. St. Louis 23 15 1 

Chas. Brown. Phila-Boston . . . . 25 57 4 

Caspar. Cincinnati 44 82 3 

McQuillan, Philadelphia 41 76 8 

Rucker, Brooklyn 38 101 8 

Sallee, SI. Louis 32 71 6 

Moren. Philadelphia 40 90 5 

Bwtag, Cincinnati 31 73 5 

Coveleskie, Philadelphia 24 87 2 

More. Boston-St. Louis 25 28 1 

Backman. St. Louis 21 39 1 

Sebrltuj, Brooklyn 25 81 11 

Earl Moore. Philadelphia 38 96 4 

Rowan. Cincinnati 38 65 4 

Kane. Chicago 15 45 6 

Raleigh. St. Ixiuis 15 23 

New York 34 81 5 

Phillippe. PittsburK 22 42 1 

Adams, Pittsburg 25 39 



(Cqn tinned). 

II. TB. 2B. 8B.HR.SH.SB. 



13 
26 



12 
5 



18 



48 54 
4 4 



12 
14 

7 
2 

7 
10 
9 
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8 
10 
8 
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II 







1 



CLUB BATTING. 

Ch.b. G. AB. R. H. TB. 2B. SB. UK. Sir. SB, 

Pittsburg 154 5129 701 1332 1809 218 92 25 211 188 

New York 157 5218 622 1327 1714 173 68 26 151 210 

Cincinnati 157 6088 606 1273 1642 159 72 22 212 280 

Chicago 155 4999 632 1227 1610 203 60 20 248 187 

Philadelphia 154 5034 516 1228 1555 185 5.': 12 239 1S5 

St. Louis 154 5108 583 1242 1517 148 56 15 119 161 

Brooklyn 166 5056 442 1157 1488 176 59 16 ' 

■ ii 155 5017 428 1121 1878 124 48 15 189 190 

IVIDUAL FIELDING. 

Name and Club. FIRST BASEMEN. G. I'd. A. K. 

92 901 40 6 

Storke, I'HIshiirg-St. Louis 19 178 

Bransfleld, Philadelphia 138 1877 89 16 

Boston 68 666 62 8 

Auirev. ii"ston-CiiM'innali 56 684 45 8 

lia 152 1684 97 20 

. New York 98 1046 72 16 

Hummel. Brooklyn 54 572 16 * 

Jordan, Brooklyn 96 937 29 17 

Hoblitzel, Cincinnati 142 1444 74 28 

186 1412 

Howard, Chicago . ■•"' r '» 3 32 1.1 

70 626 'J7 16 

Boston 33 £10 18 9 



PC. 

.116 
146 
.140 

.1 Hi 
,189 
.189 
.138 

.138 
.136 
.185 
.183 

.12:! 
.122 
.lis 
.118 
.li:; 
.111 
,110 
.HIS 
.107 
.102 

.ll!l'.l 

.094 

.092 
.089 

.0S7 
.074 
.071 
.051 



PC. 

.2.'9 
.254 
.250 
.215 
.244 
.243 
.'.»2K 
.228 



'It'. PC. 

947 .994 

I is:; ,989 

17"7 .os:, 

1134 .985 

595 .985 

988 .988 

15|i; ,982 

1604 .982 



86 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING- (Continued). 

Name and Club. SECOND BASEMEN. G. PO. A. E. 

Shean, Philadelphia-Boston 86 288 240 18 

Ritchey. Boston 25 65 52 5 

J. B. Miller. Pittsburg 15,) 260 426 34 

Egan. Cincinnati u 6 271 376 34 

Hummel. Brooklyn 3 g fj6 106 9 

Zimmerman, Chicago 31 66 65 7 

Ward. Philadelphia 4g 5g 77 g 

Evers, Chicago 126 262 SS4 88 

Doyle. New York 144 292 323 39 

Knabe, Philadelphia no 237 312 36 

Huggins. Cincinnati 31 70 97 12 

Alperman. Brooklyn log 266 297 42 

Starr, Philadelphia-Boston (^4 103 140 18 

Charles, St. Louis-Cincinnati gi 178 21 1 34 

Joe Delahanty, St. Louis 4g 77 1J3 20 

„ , , THIRD BASEMEN. 

Lennox Brook yn. m ,„ 2I0 1G 

Grant, Philadelphia... 154 18431022 

Mowrey, Cincinnati-St. Louis 23 16 39 1 

Steinfeldt, Chicago ' .r, ,„„;,; 

McElveen, Brooklyn .,!. t,i,% 

Devlin, New York ,'j.l .'\ .,™ J. 

Getz. Boston ..; ^ 32 il" g 

Huggins. Cincinnati ,r ,, r Si 5 

Byrne. Pittsburg-St. Louis ,J? of? oS o? 

Lobert, Cincinnati {-' Tw 9S « 

Sweeney. Boston "; Jf.j j~ %. \f, 

Barbeau. Pittsburg-St. Louis i„ {« 9 V ]'■'■ 

Shafer. New York ...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.I 16 11 19 10 

..v ■ L . ,. , SHORTSTOPS. 

Abbaticchio, Pittsburg 1Q ., en . 

Storke, St. Louis J° « 67 4 

Sweeney. Boston # S 1 S *i 

Bridwell. New York .*£ <* .f, J 

Wagner. Pittsburg <5 ^6» «» « 

Tinker, Chicago ,« *" 4.1 49 

Doolan.Philadali.hu H7 w 22 S 

Hulswitt. St. Louis «£ Yj?^" 

Charles, St. Louis-Cincinnati ™ 'S ^ T? 

McMillan. Brooklyn .;; .{* .«« " 1.1 

Downey. Cincinnati '; .'' 

Dahlen. Boston '. ' ; f 

Co(Tee. Boston .V... i* 12 aw 2 

Fletcher. New York " "• **» *? 

Hummel. Brooklyn ™ $«J 

Osteen, St. Louis !!.\\"i;!.\"!;; 16 17 418 

„ . . . . . OUTFIELDERS. 

Hummel. Brooklyn ,„ .„ „ . 

A. C. Downey, Brooklyn J» 2? S J 

Deininger. Philadelphia J* £ ? ? 

Clarke. Pittsburg "\ f « * J 

Jo,- Delahanty. St. I.„„i "J *£ » J 

oakes. Cincinnati ..:::::::::::::: m SS « 2 



TC. PC. 
446 .960 
122 .959 
720 .953 
681 .950 
181 .950 
128 .945 
143 .944 
654 .942 
654 .940 
5&5 .938 
179 .933 
605 .931 
261 .931 
423 .920 
210 .905 



888 .869 

516 .957 

58 .948 

513 .940 

112 .937 

544 .934 

121 .934 

57 .930 

620 .929 

419 .921 

412 .'.«)3 

409 .895 

40 .750 



116 .965 
238 .958 
168 .U43 
v.;. .840 
823 .940 
840 .940 
890 .939 
373 .930 

170 m 

641 .011 

314 .908 

386 .896 

101 .898 

159 .881 

tt xn 



35 1000 

27 1000 

-- 188 

384 .987 

188 .988 

288 ,8W 



iiamBM 



87 

INDIVIDUAL FIELDING- HI ITKIK1.DEKS- (Continued). 

Nrme and Club. G. PO. A. E. 

Osborn. Philadelphia 54 126 14 3 

O'Hara. New York Ill 202 19 5 

Thomas. Boston 77 155 9 4 

W. Miller. Clncinnati-Pittsburg 40 79 3 2 

Titus. Philadelphia 149 241 23 8 

Magee, 1'hiludelphia MS 283 11 9 

Leach, Pittsburg 188 333 12 11 

Beaumont Boston Ill 234 la 8 

Paskert, Cincinnati 82 172 11 • 

Schulte, Chicago 140 169 14 6 

Seymour, New York 73 138 11 5 

Sheckard, Chicago 148 277 18 10 

Beck, Boston 55 134 8 5 

Clement. Brooklyn 88 17!) 11 7 

Hofman. Chicago *& 847 16 I3 

Mitchell, Cincinnati 145 262 20 11 

Wilson. Pittsburg 154 292 19 14 

Burch. Brooklyn 151 320 23 16 

Ellis. St. Louis 145 332 28 17 

Bescher, Cincinnati 117 247 14 13 

Wheat. Brooklyn 26 54 5 3 

Bates, Philadelphia-Boston 133 253 27 14 

Sebring, Brooklyn 25 35 4 Z 

Kustus, Brooklyn 5° 92 <? 5 

I. undey, Brooklyn 52 83 9 5 

Murray New York 149 222 3014 

Evans. St. Louis Ml 212 19 13 

Stanley. Chicago 16 17 It 

Shaw. St. Louis 92 189 14 13 

Becker. Boston 152 222 26 18 

Murphy. St. I,.uis 9 35 2 3 

McCormick. New York 110 1« «« 

Snodgrass. New York 20 31 4 3 

Herzog. New York 30 49 4 5 

Hunter, Brooklyn 23 26 1 4 



TC. PC. 
MS .979 
226 .9T7 

168 .976 

84 .976 

272 .971 

30:: .870 

358 .969 
257 .969 
189 .968 
189 .968 
154 .967 
305 .967 
147 .966 
200 .965 

376 .965 
198 .962 
325 .957 

359 .91,5 

377 .9.-.S 
274 .953 

62 .952 
294 .952 

41 .951 
103 .951 

97 .'.MS 
266 .947 
244 .947 

19 .947 
216 .940 
266 .982 

40 .925 
170 .923 

38 .921 

58 .914 

31 .871 



CATCHl ! 

Name and Club. 0. PO. A. 

A. Wilson, New York 17 56 12 

Gibson. Pittsburg 150 655 192 

UoLean, Cincinnati 95 379 119 

Bergen, Brooklyn 112 436 202 

Moran. Chicago 74 181 97 

Smith. Boston 81 IS.'! 39 

Hot!,, Cincinnati 62 188 46 

Clarke. Cincinnati 17 85 26 

Myers. N.-w York 64 376 il 

Schlei, New York 89 493 127 

Bresnahan. St. LouJl 59 211 78 

Archer. Chicago 80 408 97 

Phelps. St- Louis 83 330 87 

Bliss. 32 138 H 

Marshall. Brooklyn 47 110 61 

gooin. Philadelphia M0 

gowerman. Boston 27 122 fi 

Graham. Bos too 76 193 111 



B. 
1 

15 
11 
18 
8 
5 
8 
4 

17 
21 
12 
21 
20 
9 
9 
40 
12 
22 



TC. 

68 
962 

509 
656 
286 

177 
242 
115 

644 
301 
526 
437 
184 
180 
756 
167 
326 



PB. 

1 
10 



PC. 

.985 



14 


.978 


6 


.973 


2 


.972 


1 




5 


.967 


1 


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8 


.963 


4 


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5 




li 




3 


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?. 


.950 


Ill 


.947 


2 


.934 


15 


.932 



Club. G. I'D. A. E. PB.PC. 

Pittsburg. . . . 164 4201 1880 22x 10 .964 
Chicago .. . 166 4024 1857 244 7.961 
Philadelphia . 154 8942 1977 241 21 .961 
Brooklyn 153 3911 1934 282 3 .950 

PITCHERS' RECORD3. T. Field. II 

Name and Club. G.PO.A. E. C. PC. B. 

♦Leever, Pittsburg 19 22 23 1.000 4 

H. Camnitz, PittBbui*.. 41 9 63 2 7 



88 

CLUB FIELDING. 
Club. 

New York.. 
Cincinnati. 
St. Louis. . 
Boston 



0. I'O. A. E. PB.PC. 
157 4306 2066 307 13 .954 
157 4201 1935 309 21 .952 

154 1118 2088 322 9 .951 

155 3998 2075 342 20 .947 



Mathewson. New York.. 37 19 96 4 119 .966 

Adams. Pittsburg 25 1 33 3 37 .919 3 

' 7 
3 



If . Brown, Chicago 50 18 83 3 104 .971 



Higginbotham. St.L-Ch. 22 

Pfiester. Chicago 29 

Phillippe, Pittsburg .... 22 

Leirteld. Pittsburg 32 

Kroh. Chicago 17 



.870 
.974 



2:; 

77 

26 32 l.uoo 

53 3 62 .952 

6 37 1 44 .977 



4 
6 
1 

Willis. Pittsburg 39 16 B6 5 106 .953 4 

Keulbach. Chicago 35 15 91 5 111 .955 11 

Overall. Chicago 38 12 69 8 84 .964 8 

Willse, New York 37 9 62 2 73 .972 6 

Caspar. Cincinnati 44 2 56 3 61 .951 9 

Maddox, Pittsburg 31 6 54 2 62 .968 15 

Corridon, Philadelphia.. 27 8 70 4 s2 .951 6 

Earl Moore. Phila 88 10 54 6 70 .914 

Ames. New York 34 11 99 9 119 .923 

Raymond. New York.... 39 8 86 9 103 .913 

CrandaU. New York 80 9 39 

Ffl •mine, Cincinnati 37 7 B9 

W. D. Scanlan. Brooklyn 19 

Moren, Philadelphia 40 

Bell, Brooklyn 88 10 81 

Higgins. St Louis 16 4 20 

Richie. Phila.-Boston. .. 33 8 31 

F.wing, Cincinnati.. . . .. 31 7 42 

Rowan, Cincinnati 38 7 40 

Salle*. St. Loofa 32 7 63 

McQuillan, Philadelphia. 41 8 66 64 1.000 

Beebe. St. Louis 44 15 81 7 103 .932 

Mattern. Boston 47 21 100 10 131 



99 9 119 
86 9 108 

89 .: .1 

1 

5 

6 


4 



34 .971 
59 .915 



9 
4 

6 

941 :; 
923 3 
4 



97 

24 1.IIO0 

43 .907 

67 .860 

50 .940 

73 .959 



StruckW. 
BB.out.P. 

14 2:', o 

68 133 2 

36 149 4 

2:i 65 1 

5:: 172 9 

22 34 

49 73 3 

14 38 2 

51 43 1 

30 51 

Si 95 4 

*2 1 1 15 4 

80 205 1 1 
51 119 4 
57 65 3- 
39 56 2 

61 69 4 
108 173 4 

81 116 18 
87 121 9 

101 126 5 

93 110 5 
73 95 3 
17 16 8 

62 53 3 
3 
6 
1 
8 



T. Shut 
G.out W. 

8 
6 25 
2 8 25 
;s 12 
8 27 



6 



.92;: 
74 .946 14 
59 .983 9 
73 .945 10 
47 .957 5 
54 .944 



Rucker, Brooklyn 38 3 67 4 

Campbell, Cincinnati.... 30 3 55 1 

Lush. St. Louis 34 9 60 4 

Coveleskie, Philadelphia. 24 6 39 2 

Harmon. St. Louis 21 6 45 3 

Sparks. Philadelphia. .. . 21 I 81 35 1.000 

I has Brown. Ph. -Bus. 25 11 44 4 59 .932 

White. Boston 23 6 37 6 49 .877 

Foxen. Philadelphia 18 8 12 2 

Mclntire. Brooklyn 82 8 52 I 

Hunter, Brooklyn 16 5 31 8 

, Cincinnati 19 4 23 5 

Marquard. N. Y 29 

Backman, St. Louis 21 

Wilhelm. Brooklyn .... 22 8 66 t 

Ferguson. Boston 89 10 63 5 78 .936 12 

More. St. L. -Boston. 23 2 31 2 88 .947 7 

Linda... 15 2 16 2 20 .900 1 

Raleigh. St. Louis 15 4 21 3 31 

Melter. St. Louis 23 5 21 26 1.000 2 

Tucker, Boston 17 11 28 3 42 .929 3 

* Pitched only two complete games. 



4 
8 

8 
1 

.960 4 

.944 21 

.928 3 

.844 I 



89 

52 .923 9 



88 
65 



.975 8 
.908 



104 81 

54 96 

104 105 15 

101 88 L8 

101 201 5 

39 37 2 
gg .;.. g 

49 66 1 
65 48 7 
32 40 2 
72 42 10 

50 63 6 
32 37 7 
91 84 4 

48 19 6 

78. 108 8 

59 45 8 

83 87 3 

40 27 5 

21 26 2 
20 24 7 

22 16 1 



17 
I 

8 19 

2 9 

1 4 22 
8 19 
9 20 

I 80 

1 I 19 
4 13 
3 11 
4 18 

2 3 16 

8 is 

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2 8 

1 1 16 

6 16 

1 2 8 

1 2 II 
(111 

2 1 10 

I 18 
1 15 

2 15 

7 

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2 6 




6 

6 

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3 




L. PC. 

1 .889 
6 .806 
6 .806 

3 .800 
9 .750 

2 .760 

6 .739 

3 .727 
8 .704 

4 .690 
11 .667 

10 .655 

11 .645 
11 .646 

11 .633 
8 .619 

7 .611 

12 .600 

12 .600 

4 .600 

13 .594 

7 .533 
15 .516 

15 .516 
3 .500 

8 .500 
12 .478 

12 .478 
11 .476 

16 .448 
21 .417 
21 .417 
19 .406 
11 .389 
18 .379 

10 .375 

11 .353 
II .353 

8 .333 

13 .316 
7 .300 

17 .292 

10 .286 

5 .286 
13 .278 

11 214 
13 .187 
23 .179 
10 .167 

6 .143 
10 .091 

1 .000 

9 .000 





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OFFICIAL RULES FO R ALL ATHLETIC SPORTS. 1 

The following list contains the Group and the Number of the hook of 
Spalding's Athletic Library in which the rules wanted are contained. Sea 
front pages of book for complete list of Spalding's Athletic Library. 



Event. 



All-Kound Athletic Cham- 
pionship 

A. A. U. Athletic Rules 

A. A. U. Boxing Rules 

A. A. U. Gymnastic Kules. . 

A. A. U. Water Polo Rules. 

A. \. LI. Wrestling Rules.. . 

Archery 

Badminton 

Base Ball 

Indoor 

Basket Ball, Official 

Collegiate 

Women's 

Water 

Basket Goal 

Bat Ball 

Betting 

Bowling 

Boxing — A. A. U., Marquis 
of Queensbury, London 
Prize Ring 

Broadsword I mounted) 

Caledonian < femes 

Canoeing 

Children's Games 

Court Tennis 

Cricket 

Croquet 

Curling 

Dog Racing 

Fencing 

Foot Ball 

Code of Rules 

Association (Soccer) 

English Ruvrby 

Canadian 

Golf 

Golf -Croquet 

Hand Ball 

Hand Polo 

Hand Tennis 

Hitch and Kick 

Hockey 

1 Ice 

Field 

Garden 

Uwn 

Parlor 

Ring 

Ontario Hockey Axs'n 

Indoor Base Ball 

Intercollegiate A. A. A. A.. 

I.-C. Gymnastic Asa'n 

Lacrosse 

U. S. I.-C I.arros«< 



1 


No. 


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11 


887 



Event. 



Lawn Bowls 

Lawn (lames 

Lawn Tennis 

Obstacle Races 

Olympic GameEvcnts— Mar- 
athon Race. Stone Throw- 
ing with Impetus, Spear 
Throwing:. Hellenic-Method 
of Throwing: Discus. Dis- 
cus.GreekStylefoi Youths 

Pigeon Flying- 

Pin Ball 

Playground Ball 

Polo i Equestrian i 

Polo. Rugby . . . 

Polo. Water (A. A. U.).!!!! 

Potato Racing- 

Professional Racing, Shef- 
field Rules 

Public Schools Athletic 

I-eague Athletic Rules 

Girls' Branch ; including 
Rules for School < lames. 

Puah Ball 

Push Ball. Water 

Quoits 

Racquets 

Revolver Shooting 

Ring Hockey 

Roller Pol.. 

Holler Skating Rink..!!.]. 

Roque 

Rowing !!!!!!!! 

Sack Racing 

Shuffleboara 

Skating 

.,....."! 

Snowshocing ' '//,' 

Squash Racquets ,,! 

Swimming 

Tether Tennis ....... 

rhree-Leswed Race....!!!!! 

Volley Hall 

Wall S,--,ling... 

Walking 

Water Polo (American).'.'.!! 

Water Polo (English) 

Wicket Polo 

Wrestling 

Y. M.C. A.All-Rou. 
Y. M. (,. A. Athl.-ti.- Rule* 
Y.M.C.A. Hand Ball Rules 
Y.M.C.A. Pentathlon Rules 
Y.M.C.A. Volley Ball Rules 



a 


No. 


« 




u 


207 


ii 


188 


4 


4 


12 


55 



56 
55 
55 
306 
199 
55 
311 
311 

55 



12 313 



12 


314 


11 


170 


12 


55 


11 


167 


11 


194 


12 


55 


a 


180 


10 


10 


1.1 


10 


11 


271 


13 


128 


12 


55 


12 


55 


13 


209 


12 


56 


12 


55 


11 


194 


18 


177 


11 


188 


12 


55 


6 


188 


12 


55 


12 


55 


12 


311 


12 


55 


10 


188 


14 


236 


12 


302 


12 


302 


12 


302 


12 


302 


12 


308 



BOOKS FOR ATHLETES 

Spalding Athletic Library Series 

I'RK E 1" < IN IS I'l- K < OPY 



No. 12. Spalding's Official Athletic Almanac. 

Xo. 27. College Athletics. 

No. 182. All Around Athletii s. 

No. 156, Athletes' Guide. 

No, 87. Athletii Primer. 

No. 273. Olympic Games at . Ithens. 

• '. How to Sprint. 

No. 255. How i« Run 100 Yards. 

No. 171. Distance and Cross Country Running:. 

No, 259. How to Jia out,- n Weight Thrower. 

No. 55. Official Sporting Rules, 

No. 246, Athletic Training for Schoolboys. 

No. 311. Amateur Athletii Union Official Handbook. 

Vo, U6. Intercollegiate A. .1. A. ./. 01 filial Handbook 

Vo. 102. Y. M. C. ./. Official Handbook. 

No. >'/.'. Publit Schools Athletic League Official 

Handbook. 

No. 314. official Handbook Girls' Branch Public Schools 

. l/h/etic League. 

Xo. 317. Marathon Running. 

No. 331. Schoolyard . l/h/e/ies. 



rHE following selection ol Itfms Irom their latest Catalogue will give an 
Idea ol the great variety ol ATHI.FTIC SOODS manulactured by A. G. 
SPALDING A BROS. SEND FOR A FREE COPY. 



Archery 
Bags— 

Bat 

Cricket 

Striking 

Uniform 
Balli 

Base 

Basket 

Cricket 

Field Hockey 

Foot. College 

Foot, Rugby 

Foot, Soccer 

Golf 

Hand 

Indoor 

Medicine 

Playground 

Squash 

Tennis 

Volley 

Water Polo 
Bandages. Elastic 
Bathing Suits 
Bats- 
Base Ball 

Cricket 
Belts 
Caps- 
Base Ball 

University 

Water Polo 
Chest Weights 

Circle, Seven-Foot 
( '.oats. Base Ball 
Collars, Swimming; 
Corks, Running 
Covers. Racket 
( Irlcket Goods 
Croquet Goods 
Discus, Olympic 
Dumb B.-iis 

Emblems 

Equestrian Polo 

Exerciser, Home 

Felt Lett* 

Fencing Sticks 

Field Hockey 

Flags- 
College 

Foul, Base Ball 
Marking. Golf 

Foils. Fencing 

Foot Balls- 
Association 
College 
Rugby 

Classes. Base Ball 
Sun 
Automobile 



Gloves— 

Base Ball 

Boxing 

Cricket 

Fencing 

Foot Ball 

Golf 

Handball 

Hockey, Ice 
Glove Softener 
Goals- 
Basket Ball 

Foot Ball 

Hockey, Ice 
Golf Clubs 
Golf Counters 
Golfette 

Gymnasium, Home 
Gymnasium Board 
Hammers. Athletic 
Hats, University 
Head Harness 
Health Pull 
Hockey Sticks, Ice 
Hole Cutter, Golf 
Hole Rim, Golf 
Horse. Vaulting 
Bardies, Safety 
Hurley Goods 
Indian Clubs 
Jackets — 

Fencing 

Foot Ball 
Javelins 
Jerseys 

Knee Protectors 
Lacrosse 
I-anes for Sprints 
Lawn Bowls 
Leg Guards- 
Base Ball 

Cricket 

Foot Ball 

Markers, Tennis 
Masks — 

Base Ball 

Fencing 

Hose [tnaJ 

Masseur, A lid onr 
Mattresses 
Megaphones 
Mitts— 

Baea Ball 

Handball 

Striking Bag 
Moccasins 
Nets- 

Cricket 

Coir Driving 

Tennis 

Volley Ball 



Numbers, Compet- 

Pads — [Item' 

Chamois, Fencing 
Foot Ball 
Sliding. Base Ball 

Pants- 
Base Ball 
Basket Ball 
Foot Ball, College 
Foot Ball, Rugby 
Hockey, Ice 
Running 

Pennants, College 

Plates- 
Base Ball Shoe 
Home 

Marking. Tennis 
Pitchers' Box 
Pitchers' Toe 
Teeing. Golf 

Platforms, Striking 
Hair 

Poles- 
Vaulting 

Polo, Roller, Goods 

Posts- 
Backstop. Tennis 
I.awn Tennis 

Protectors — 
Abdomen 
Base Ball Body 
Kyi- Glass 

Push Ball 

Quoits 

Rackets, Tennis 

Rings- 
Exercising 
Swinging 

Rowing Machines 

KoqiH- 

Sacks, for Sack 

Racing 
Score Board, Gotf 

Scon- It.. 

Score Tablets, Bast- 
Shirts- | Hall 

Athletic 

l.a .■ Hall 

Ba •• Ball 
Basket Hall 
Howling 
Clog 

I Country 

■ Icet 

Fencing Tation 
Foot Ball. Associ- 
Foot Ball, College 
Pool Ball, Rugby 
Foot Ball. : 
Golf 
Gymnasium 



Shoes- 
Jumping 
Running 
Skating 
Squash 
Tennis 

Shot— 
Athletic 
Indoor 
Massage 

Skates — 
Ice 
Roller 

Skis 

Sleeve, Pitchers 

Snow Shoes 

Squash Goods 

StrapB— 
Base Ball 
For Three- 
Legged Race 
Skate 

Stockings 

Striking Bags 

Suits- 
Basket Ball 
Gymnasium 
Gymnasium, 

I .allies' 

Running 

Soccer 

Swimming 

Union Foot 
Ball 
Supporters 

Ankle 

Wrist 
Suspensories 
Sweai> 

Tether Tennis 
Tights - 

Full 

Wrestling 

Knee 
Totioggans 
Trapeze 
Trunks 

Bathing 

Velvet 

Worsted 
Umpire Indii-a- 
Uniforms I lor 
Wands, Calis- 

thenic 
Watches, Stop 

Wat.-i Wings 

. 68-lb. 

Whitely Exer- 
cisers 

Wrestling 
Equipment 



vi itrottitumml 9«w ««U iftuI/» 



Jun< lat, 1009* 
1 Hereby certify that 
Spalding 1 * orricial national 
League Ban has teen th« 
adopted and only orricial ball 
or the National League elnoo 
1678. Thla tall muat be used 
In all Championship Gases. 



faxJ\r»-*-\^\t* 



Prea't Rational Lea^uei 



The Spalding 

"Official 

National League 
Ball 

Has a Record Unparalleled In Base Ball 
History 



Adopt 

National League 

' Ball 
and used by it exclusively for 32 years 
Adopted by the 

Eastern League 

as its Official Ball 

and used by it exclusively for 22 years 
by the 
New England League 

and used by it exclusively for 22 years 
Adopted bv the 

New York State League 
as its I 

and used by it exclusively for 13 years 
Adopted I 

California State League 
-' Ball 
and used by it exclusively for 10 years 
Adopted bv the 

Indlana-Illinols-Iowa League] 
as it.- ' 
. . and used by it exclusively for 9 years 

Adopted 

Pacific Coast League 

■ . ! UN by it exclusively for 7 years 

Adopted i 

Central League 
as its 
I 1j ""d us<k1 by it exclusively for 7 years 

Adopted by the 

Western Association 
as it i 
and used by it exclusively for 7 years 



Adopted by the 

Northwestern League 

as its Official Ball 

and used by it exclusively for 6 years 

Adopted bv the 

South Atlantic League 

a.- its Official Ball 

and used by it exclusively for 6 years 

Adopted by the 

Virginia League 

as its Official Ball 

and used by it exclusively for 6 years 

Adopted by the 

Ohio-Pennsylvania League 

' Ball 

and used by it exclusively for 5 years 

Adopted by the 

Central Association 

and used by it exclusively for 5 years 

Adopted bv the 

Wisconsin-Illinois Association 

aa its i Bail 

and used by it exclusively for 4 years 

Adopted i „ 

South Michigan Association 

Ball 

and cmd by it exclusively for 3 years 

A! " Pennsylvania-West Virginia Ass'- 

and used by it exclusively for 2 years 

by the 
Ohio State League 

as.' ■'' . , - „ ._ 

and used by it exclusively for 2 years 



In addition to the above list, the Spalding "Official National League" Ball has been adopted' for one ; 

| gJJ'we years by over one hundred other Professional and Amateur Leagues. The Spalding Lcag 

is m universal use by all the leading college and school teams throughout the United States. 

,, u , Wh "" to the above is added every foreign league on the face of the earth where Base Ball is ; 

8on.u. ,ncludin lf Canada, Mexico. England, C Seo. Hawaii. Japan, Australia, India the | 

8 aco! a A , merican Republics and South Africa, some idea may be conveyed of the universal recognition ■ 

"WT '° the S P aldin K "Official National League " BalL 

'" ''■' : - : '"'::-::::: ....... /.. :::;■; ■,:.;::: ■ ■ ■• 



"9 

The Spalding 

"OFFICIAL 

National League Ball 

Is in a class by itself. It has no rival, even in approximate excellence. It has attained 
a decree of perfection in manufacture where the genius of man seems unable to conceive of 
any design for its improvement. The Spalding Ball has reached this high stage of develop- 
ment from very modest beginnings. Time was when American boys had to be satisfied 
with a base ball composed of a slice from a rubber shoe, some yarn from their dad's woolen 
sock and a cover made of leather bought from the village cobbler and deftly wrapped and 
sewed on by their patient mother, after her day's work was done. But that time is no 
more; for, whatever may be true of the doughnuts and pies that "mother used to make," 
— and we all remember how good they were— the home-made creations of our maternal 
ancestry in the base ball line had to give way when the house of A. G. Spalding & Bros, 
entered that field, and long ago the Spalding "Official National League" Ball 
distanced all competition in the race for popular supremacy. 

The game of base ball has become our National Game because its integrity has been 
preserved through many years. For identically the same reason, the Spalding " Official 
National League " Ball has won its place in the high esteem of all devotees of the sport. 
Like the game in which it is used, its integrity is above suspicion. 

It is well for the youth ot America to learn the lesson that while the cheapest things 
are very seldom the best things, the best are always the cheapest in the end. The price of 
the genuine Spalding " Official National League " Ball is $1.25 each— no more 
and no less. The market abounds with so-called " League Balls," all listed at $1.25 each, 
for the sole purpose of deceiving the purchaser and enabling the "just as good " dealer to 
work the discount scheme on the boy who is not posted. 

This is the reason why bright boys always insist upon the Spalding Ball and decline to 
accept any substitute. To many parents, a ball is a ball ; but to the American lad who 
knows, only a Spalding Hall is the genuine and Official Ball of the game, and substitution 
of "something equally as good " docs not go with him, for he his learned that to become 
a good ball player and get the greatest pleasure out of the game, he must use the same ball 
that all the leading professional pbyen . 

use— and this is the Spalding "Official sf£^ ^S? ~) ' s& 

National League " Ball. \~/77y! C^^<^4^>5<%-^' 



Stute THE SPALDING I 



ITRADE-MARKTaTt? 5 







.» 




Spalding 
"Official 
National 
League' 

Ball 



Official Ball 
of the Game 
for over 
Thirty Years 



DOPTED by the National League in 1878, and the only ball used in Cham- 
pionship games since that time. Each ball wrapped in tinfoil, packed in 
a separate box, and sealed in accordance with the latest League regula- 
tions. Warranted to last a full game when used under ordinary conditions. 



No. 1. Each, 91.25 



Per Dozen, $15.00 



*"' ' COMHUHiCtTIONS 

&-i°0«tSStC ID in 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



[ FOR COMPLETE LIST Of STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OfTHlS 800t 



wiy 5,1910 Subjctl to change without notec. 



tWion p'tta yt tptatii 



.1 Canadian CilekQuc 



ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING I 



iTRADE-MARK^Kf 



.Gold Medal Autograph Bats 

FOR THE PAST THIRTY YEARS, or since our Base Ball Bat Factory was established, we have turned 
out special model bats to suit the leading- players of the prominent professional leagues, and our records 
will show hundreds of diffewnt bats made in accordance with the ideas of the individual player, many of 
whom have been league record -makers. The models that have been adopted have been duplicated by us from 
time to time as they have required additional bats, and in hundreds of cases we have been requested to fur- 
nish to other players duplicate bats that have been made for and used by well-known players. In order to 
satisfy the ever-increasing demand from our customers for bats of the same models as used by the leading play- 
ers, we have obtained permission from many of the leading batters of the country to include in our line of 
high grade bats these Gold Medal *' Autograph " Bats, bearing their signature. Space will not permit a descrip- 
tion of all the various models, but the following models have been selected as examples of what we arc pro- 
ducing in this special " Players* Autograph " Bat Department. 



Autograph Model 

This is a %ery large Bat 
wlthalalrly thick handle. 
Hals supplied will m.l 
weigh \t\\ than li nor 
over Is ounces. Length 
about 3i inch**. 




=a No. 100. PLAIN OIL FINISH. Each, Sl.OO o= 



Autograph Model 

This is a large Bat, the 
sumr length as the i hum r 

Modd.with km weight twi 

norr rvrnl) distributed, 

and not qultr as thick | 

handle. Bats will not 

weigh Irs* lhaa II nor 

over 44 ounces. Length about li inches. 



Autograph Model 



I a _«B I Also a large Bat. almost 

JT^B I Ihr length ol Ihf thaare 

*m I Model, but with much less 

^L% I uood, especially in Ihr 

1 i_Jmmm± I nana,f P" rI "' ,h ' Bal - 

Um^mmmmt Bats supplied win not 

«t1p> le« thai II nor over 14 ounce*. 



1 



Autograph Model 



A well balanced snail 
handle Bal ol very popu- 
lar modrl. Bats supplied 
Mill not weigh less than 
as nor ovtr 41 ounces, chance 
Model 




Autograph Model 

This Bal it somewhat 
shorter lhaa Ihr I ha nee 
Model, medium thick 
haadlr and rounded end. 
Bats supplied will not 
wrigh less than 41 nor 
oser 13 ounces. Length at 



C2^— x~£*+ 




~. \ 



Autograph Model 

A symmetrically shaped 
Bal, good balk, medium 
thick handle. Bats sup- 
plied will not weigh less 
than 1 1 nor more than 13 
MMS> 

Autograph Model j 
A sbon Bal with a snail 
handle, but wilh good 
bulk in the balance ol the 
Bal Bats supplied will ' 
not weigh less than 39 nor over II oa*^ 




>^^ 



Autograph Model 

This Model and the 
Chance Bat loach Ihr two 
extremes in models and 
wrighls usrd b) Ihr great 
majority ol prominent 

trulesslonal pltjrrv the 
Htar tiodrl is short and 
has fairly thin handle. Bats supplied * 
not wrigh less than 36 oar oser 39 o** 
Length about 31 inches. 




=We i 



i alio sppply on apedal orders Donlln. stone and Oaken ModeU 



CORRESPONDENCE— If you wish anv particular model bat. ind 
deacrtption ol same. an<! address inyof our branch ■tore*, the mailer will be lakei 



the bal you require, (he length, weight ami fuj| 
,), arhh at catoraeri wn° 

the exact model and style and weight »i bal tiicy require. Tins aril I i. vers" A Olograph " !!■>' 

Department. This entire department is looked alter by the tnanag- ■ , Ball Jjrpiriment, whoti famil" f 

with most ol the type* of models used by the leading players, and to whom will I* referred any unusual model. At least tw* 
necks' time is required to make bats after customer's own model. 



PROMPT *TTEBT10N GIVEN TO I 

III! CDMMJNICATIONS 

tSDRESSEO TO US 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



mcDmoiunvnaB 

SEE INSIDE fRONT COVE* 
Of HIS 8001 



itifHi li chanff! without tmlite. tot (.anatttan pin 



t ificaal Lonadtan iutaU>/uc 



ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING I 




(TRADEMARK 



GUARANTEES 
QUALITY 



Spalding Trade-Mark Bats 

Spalding Black Diamond Bat 

This hat is of same quality as our Gold Medal Autograph 
Bats, and is furnished in the most popular models. The 
special finish which we use on this one grade is a similar 
preparation to that which many professional players rub 
on their own bats, and has a tendency to darken the color 
of the bat. 
No. 100D. Each.S 1. 00 

Spalding Dreadnought Bat 

Extreme Size 

This bat is turned out of specially selected well seasoned 
ash, and in the largest size, 2\ inches in diameter, allowed 
under the official playing rules: an excellent bat for pre- 
liminary swings before going to bat. In assorted lengths. 
No. 100L. Plain Oil Finish. Each, $1.00 

Spalding Becord Bat 

Plain Oil FlnUh 

This Spalding Record Bat is made from the most popular 
models, but finished in rough and ready style, with no 
polish— simply the plain oil finish. Packed one dozen in 
a crate (assorted lengths from 30 to 35 inches and weights 
from 36 to 42 ounces), as nearly as possible in the follow- 
LENGTHS ^proportion; mim$ 

1-36 Ounces 2-39 Ounces 




1-30 Inches 2-33 Inches 
1-31 Inches 1 31 Inches 
2-32 Inches 2-35 Inches 



37 Ounces 

38 Ounces 



4 40-41 Oz. 
2-41-42 Oz. 



y find 03 

ii mi ' 'll't-i- 

The Record Bat is especially recommended for club use. 

Including college and school teams. 

No. 75. Plain Oil Finish. Each, 75c ( 

Spalding Mushroom Bat 

r*Unt«d Aanri 1. IMS 

The Knob Arrangement at the end of the bat enables us 
to get a more even distribution of weight over the whole 
length than is possible under the old construction, making 
it for certain kinds of play practically invaluable, and as 
an all around hat we have received many letters from 
prominent professional players testifying to their appre- 
ciation of the good points in its construction. Only the 
:or-dried timber has been used and 
everyone ' ''>'an expert before leaving 

our factory. 
No. 50M. Plain Bat, Special Finish. . Each. 50c 



Spalding Boys' Record Bat 



?***• Samc finish, quality and models as the Record, but shorter lengths and proportionate weights. 
An absolutely first grade boys' bat. ....... Each, SOc. 

"old your b , t pr0|ier | y an<1 strlkt the baU ^,1, the gf.^^ r, on 't blame the manufacturer for a 
break which occurs through abuse or improper use 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



fOll COMPUTE LIST OF STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVE" 

Of THIS 6001 



/anuaig 5, I'tlO. Subject In cnangt uilhtul notice, /v' (,'anaa'ian fvita xc inraat Canadian Catalogue 



KSe THE SPALDING' 



ITRADEMARK w Snf 



SPALDING 

Trade - Mark 

BATS 



No. 30T No. SO No. 35T No. 25 No SOW 




SINCE 1877, when we introduced the Spald- 
ing line of Trade-Mark Bats, they nave 
been recognized as standard by players to whom 
quality is a consideration. Wherever possible, 
we have improved both style and quafity from 
time to time and the assortment as now made 
up comprises absolutely the most up-to-date 
and thoroughly trustworthy styles that can be 
produced. The timber used in their construc- 
tion is seasoned in open sheds, exposed to the 
weather from two to three years before using, 
thus ensuring not only a lighter and stronger 
bat, but also retaining the life quality and 
driving power of the natural wood. 



Spalding Oils arc made lor fair ^ 

use. Strike Hllh the grain and fj 

dun'lblamrlhe manufacturer lor " 
a brf ak which occurs olhcrw 1st. 



Spalding Men's Bats 

No. BOT. Taped "League" 
Ash Bat, tape wound ;, 
extra quality, special finish. 
Each. BOc. 
No BO. "League" Aa-h Bat, 
plain handle) Each. BOc. 
No. 3BT. Tried "City 
League" Bat, finest straight 
grained aah; tape wound 
handle. Kach. 3Bc. 

No. 38. "(StsrLeuW'Bat, 
plain handle. Each, 28c. 

Special Bats 
tor "Fungo" Hitting 

No, BOW. 'Willow," light 
weight, full size IV 
handle. Each, BOc. 

Spalding Boys' Bats 

No. 26B. "Junior league" 
>>n; extra qua! i' 

28c. 
No. 2BBT. Tkptd "Junior 
League" Bat. tape wound 
handle, special finish. 28c. 
No. I OB. "Boys' League" 
Bat, good quality' ash. var- 
nished. . . Each, lOc. 




N0.29B N..25BT No. IOB 



PIOMrTlTlEKTlCIEirEIIIOl 
_ 1KT CaHMUNICiTIDMS 
* IDOntSSiO TO IIS 



A. G. SPALDING 6, BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



m cDHPurE usi oi stow 

lii USIK KM I COYU 
II HIS 1001 __ 



P/tut in tjl*t /onoofy 5. 1910. >dj«l Iw cAanf* utlhoul nu 



substitute THE SPALDING I 



M 



ITRADE-MARK G =f 



Spalding " Protrsslonal " Catchers' Milt 

t>«L VK. V. IW 




No. 8-0. Face of white buck, specially selected 
and best quality procurable. Sides and back of 
finest quality calfskin; hand formed patent pad- 
ding of best hair felt* reinforced and laced at 
thumb ; leather laced back; strap-and- buckle 
fastening Each, *7.0O 



Spalding "Perfection" Catchers' Mill 




- 7-0. Made of beat quality brown calfskin 
throughout; patent combination molded /ace; 
Patent hand formed padding of beat hair fflt. 
making a perfect pocket without any breaking 
JJ> : leather laced back and thumb : strap-and- 
•wckle fastening. . Each. J6.0O 



Spalding " International " Catchers' HUM 




No. r-OB. Made of superior quality black 
calfskin ; patent combination molded face : 
leather laced back and thumb. Patent hand 
formed padding of best hair felt, making a per- 
fect pocket without any breaking .in ;strap- 
and-buckle fastening. . Each. »6.«M» 



SpaMlif "CtUejUk" CaldKn" W« 
Mslee* fact. "• '-■ «■ ""• *» "■ "" 




No. 6-0. Made of spec al olive colored leather 
excellent quality, perfectly tanned Wf""* "£ 
produce the necessary "pocket ™y™JfS; 
Tutelr smooth surface on face; hand formed felt 
padding; leather laced back and thumb strap- 
ind-buckle fastening. E* - * 800 



all armxa made n iKom and um 






"^nmmioN (inn io 

"" COHHUH canons 
igWssm TO it 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I IM COMPUTE IISI Of StOKS 

s(i imsih mow COVH 
at this loot 



«. JNuJi J.'l I jtuL*jut 



ACCEPT NO 
I SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING l 




ITRADEMARK 



Spalding Catchers* Mitts 



Spalding 
'League Extra" Catchers' Mitt 



P>l. Sept. 2*. IVOS 




No. 6-0. Special drab tanned buck, very soft 
and pliable, patent hand formed felt padding,- 
strap-and-buckle fastening at back reinforced 
and laced at thumb, and made with our patent 
laced back. Each, S4.00 



Spalding 
"Interstate" Catchers' Mitt 




No. O. Professional size model. Face, side* 
and finger piece of velvet tanned brown leather; 
back of selected buck, well padded; strap-and- 
buckle fastening, reinforced and laced at thumb, 
patent laced back Each, S3. 00 



Spalding "Decker Patent" Catchers' Mitts 






Showing Back of Nm. OX and 3-0 Milt* 



No. OX. Face of velvet tanned brown leather, 
heavy piece of sole leather on back for protection to 
fingers; strap-and-buckle at back, reinforced and 
laced at thumb; patent laced back. Each t S3.0O 



No. 3-0. Good quality black calfskin, patent laced 
back, reinforced and laced at thumb. Sti»D-and- 
buckle fastening at back. Heavy pieceof sole leather 
on back for extraprotection to fingers. Ea.,»3.00 



ALL STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 



PROMPT MENTION 6IVENT0I 
JNI COHMUMICATIONS 

>OOBESSID Ifl IIS 



A.G.SPALDING &. BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



| FOR COMPLETE l!ST Of STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF HIS BOOT 






utfAouf notice Vai Canadia 



ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING I 



22SC 



^mA 



TRADEMARK 



GUARANTEES 
QUALITY 




Spalding "Decker Patent " 
Catchers' Milt 

Black leather; heavy sole lea- 
ther finger protector on back; 
strap - and - buckle fastening: 
reinforced and laced at thumb; 
patent laced back. 
No. OR. Each, 52.50 



Spalding 
"Inter-City" Catchers' 



Mitt 

Face of brown velvet tanned 
leather; strap-and-buckle fas- 
tening; reinforced and laced 
at thumb; par- 

No. OA. Each. 82. SO 




Spalding 
"Semi-Pro" Catchers' Mitt 

Black leather; strap-and-buckle 

fastening: reinforced and laced 

at thumb; patent laced back. 

No. IR. Each, 82. OO 

Spalding 

*'Alhlelle" Catchers* Mitt 

Face of smoked horsehide; 

correctly padded, reinforced 

and laced at thumb; patent 

laced back; strap-and-buckle 

fastening. 

No. IS. Each, 82. OO 



Spalding 
"Back-Slop" Catchers' Milt 

Good quality special tanned 
ted leather face; cor- 
rectly pad 'I ed ; rtrap^and- 
1 
and laced at thumb; patent 
laced back. 
No. IC. Each, 81.00 

Spalding 
"Champion" Catchers' Milt 

Black face with special buff 
leather reinforcement on palm; 
strap-and-buckle fastening; re- 
inforced and laced at thumb. 
No. ID. Each, 81.25 




g 




MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 



PROMPT *TIENTiOM GIVEN TO 1 
'"» COMMUNICATIONS 

jnoREssEO to us 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



SFi IHSIOE FRONT COVER 
OF THIS BOOH 



t'/JLtl in rjftil Juntiaty 5, I'tW. Subject to i lunge i 



i jnpnta tee ipeual i-oneJ"irt t 



ie THE SPALDING 



TDAnr M A Dl/ GUARANTEES 

TRADEMARK quality 




Spalding "Association" Milt 

Slrap-aad-bncklr t« timing 

No. 2R. Men's size. Special black 
smooth tanned leather face, back and 
Anger-piece ; correctly padded ; rein- 
forced ana laced at thumb. Ka.,8 I .OO 



Spalding "Foul Tip" Mitt 

I til Uced Back. Slrip-«nd-hitfck Fatitajaf 

No. aC. Men's size. Oak tanned lea- 
therface, correctly padded; reinforced 
and laced at thumb; back made inpop- 
ular half laced style. Each, 9 1 .00 



Spalding "dub" Mi:t 

Palcal Laced lack. Slraa-a»«-k*rki< Faateataf 

No. 2A. Men's size. White buck fae*, 
back and finger-piece; tough and dur- 
able; padded to form perfect pocket ; r»» 
in forced, laced at thumb. Ea.. S I .OO 




NO. 2B 



Spalding "Youths' League" Mitt 

f.tml Urt. Back 

No. SB. Youths' full size. Pearl colored 
special smooth tanned leather face, cor- 
rectly padded ; strap-and-buckle fasten- 
">K- • • ' • u Each, S I .OO 

Spalding " Inlersdiolastic " Mm 

No. 3R. Large size. Good quality black 
smooth leather throughout; reinforced 
and laced at thumb. . Each 7 Be 



A1A STYLES OH THIS PACE 
PI RIGHTS AND 



MAI.K 

» 






NO. 4R 



Spalding "Public School" Mill 

No. 4. Large size. Improved style. 
race and back special tanned buck; 
•xtra heavily padded ; reinforced 
*nd laced at thumb. Each BOc. 



Spalding "Boys' Amakor" Mill 

No. 4R. Junior size; black smooth 
leather face and back ; white leather 
aide strip; well padded: reinforced 
and laced at thumb. Each. BOc . 




Spalding "Bojs - Delight" H 1- 

No. 0. Improved style. F£ 
and back made of special i* 1 .. 
ned buck; laced thumb; w«' 
padded. . . Each, 3»<>' 



MB 



prompt immioi (ivei to | 
Mr comiiiNiciTioiis 

IQOttSStE 10 us 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



fOI CONFUTE LIST 
B BM FMTI 

at w. sioi 



s SJHESPALDINGI 



iTRADE-MARKTKf 



S A 199 



Spalding "League Special 



EUlag " League Special ' 
». AX Basemen's Mitt 




Special professional model. Made 
•' absolutely finest quality white 
tanned buckskin, face, hack and 
lining; leather lacing all around; 
•tnp-and-buckle fastening. 
No. AX. Each, •4.00 



SpaMlng ■• League "Special ' 
N*. BXR Basemen's Mill 




"»ds of specially selected finest 
J^ity black calfskin, face, back 
• n <J hning; leather lacing all 
•"""id; strap-and-buckle fasten, 
ing. 
No. BXR. Each. S4.00 



Basemen's 



It is in the Spa Wing Base- 
men's Mitts that the full 
advantages of the special 
"molded face" feature can 
be seen and appreciated. 
These mitts, which from 
the very moment they are 
put into play should adapt 
themselves to the conform- 
ation of the hand, cannot 
be simply slapped together 
without regard to shape. 
The leather in the face 
must first of all be most 
carefully selected, and only 
the very best portions 
picked out for the peculiar 
stretching and molding 
process which goes so far 
towards making Spalding 
Basemen's Mitts the per- 
fect articles they are. Then 
the padding must be shaped 
properly by hand to form 
the necessary "pocket" 
and after that the other 
special features, only found 
in our goods, must be added, 
in order to make them 
worthy to bear the Spald- 
ing Trade-Mark. 



*ll ■.! i I I s MADE IN 
■IK. II in AND LETTS 



Spalding "League Special" 
No. BX Basemen's Mia 




Made of fine selected and specially 
tanned brown calfskin, face, back 
and lining; strap-and-buckle fas- 
tening; leather lacing all around; 
double rowof stitchingon heel pad. 
No. BX. Each, *4.00 



Spalding "League Special" 
No. BXS Basemen's Hill 




Special professional model. Mads 
of finest selected brown calfskin. 
face, back, and lining; leather 
lacingall around ; strap-and buckts 
fastening. 
No. BXS. Each. «4.00 



"""imniMtiwni 

»»T COMHUNICITIONS 
■iPOIiSStO II I 



it: 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I rn C0MPU1E LIST Of STOKS 
SH isSlDE FRONT CWfll 

Of THIS mi 



KTHESPALDINGl 



ITRADEMARK G HRf 



Spalding Basemen's Mitts 



Spalding "Professional" 
Basemen's Mitt 




Made of very durable olive calf- 
skin, face, back and lining. Cor- 
rectly padded and leather laced all 
•round and at thumb. Strap-and- 
buckte fastening. 
No. CO. Each, 83. OO 




Brown buck leather face, special 
tanned leather back and lining. 
Correctly padded ; laced all around 
and at thumb. Strap-and-buckle 
fastening.. 
No. CXS. Each. 82. OO 



Spalding "Semi-Pro" 
Basemen's Mitt 




Face of specially tanned slate- 
color leather, back of firm tanned 
brown leather, laced ail around 
and at thumb: extra well padded 
at wrist and thumb. Strap-and- 
buckle fastening. 
No. CX. Each, S2.50 



Spalding "Double Play" 
Basemen's Mitt 




Men's size. Made of oak tanned 
specially selected leather, laced 
all around and at thumb. Strap- 
and-buckle fastening. Very easy 
fitting and nicely padded mitu 
No. DX. Each, 81. 60 



Spalding "Amateur" 
Basemen's Mitt (Black) 




Made with black calfskin face, 
black leather back and lining. 
Properly padded; laced all around 
and at thumb. Strap-and-buckle. 
fastening. 
No. CXR. Each, 82. OO 



Spalding "League Jr." 
Basemen's Mitt 




Made of good quality black smooth 
leather, laced all around and at 
thumb. Suitably padded and will 
give very good service. Strap- 
and-buckle fastening. . f» 
No. EX. Each. SI. OO, 



3 ALL STYLES HAUL IN RIGHTS AMD. LEFTS C 



30 



PROMPT ATTENTION G'*Etl TO | 
ANT COMMUNICATIONS 

toonissio in as 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I I0K COMMIT US! OF STORES 

SIX INSIDE HON! COVER 

0! THIS SOOI 



f'or Canadian pricri ttr tpttial Canadian Calctufuc 



S&THESMLDMGl 



ITRADE-MARK "Sffl 




Spalding Fielders' 
Mitts 



Spalding "League Extra" Pitchers' 
and Basemen's Mitt 




Showing Back of No. IF Mitt 



Made especially for Pitchers, and a very 
satisfactory style also for Basemen ; in 
fact, this is the nearest approach to an 
all around base ball mitt that has ever 
been put out. Made with face of special 
quality white buck, and the balance of 
mitt with special brown calfskin. Cor- 
rectly padded and without hump. Laced 
all around and at thumb. Strap-and- 
buckle fastening. 

No. IF. Each. $3.50 




Spalding " League Special" Fielders' Mitts 




NO. 2F 



The easiest, most pliable and 
beat made fielders' mitt ever 
Molded brown calf- 
skin face; extra full thumb, 
laced; leather lined. Strap- 
amihuckle fastening. 
No. 2F. Each, S3.00 




This mitt is made of specially 
tanned black calfskin; pan- 
i th best felt ; rein- 
forced and laced at thumb; 
leather lined. Strap-and- 
bu/kle fastening 
No. 3F. Each, S3.00 




i !' the very best and 
softest white tanned buck- 
skin; the thumb and at wrist 
i well padded; laced 
thumb; leather lined. Strap- 
andbuckle fastening 
No. 4F. Each, S3.00 



ALL STYLES MADE IN RICHTS AND LEFTS 



i 



E'DOMPl imtniBK GIVEN 10 
>HI COMMUNICATIONS 
- «PDRES5tn TD US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOR COMPUTE LIST Of STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 
OFJKJOOI 



,J,j/,».,i,l'»" SJ,,.,I,.I,., V ..», ! k. ipoi./ t«nnJ»n f«/«*»"t 



KKTHESPALDINGi 



Spalding Fielders' Mitts 



Spalding "Professional" 
Fielders' Mill 




NO. 5F 



Style much improved ; made of 
specially tanned drab leather, well 
padded with fine felt : leather 
lined and carefully sewed anil fin- 
ished ; laced thumb. Strap-and- 
buckle fastening. 
No. 6F. Each, 82.00 



Spalding "Amateur" 
Fielders Mill (Black) 




no. er 



Good quality black tanned smooth 

leather, well padded, leather lined; 

reinforced and laced at thumb. 

Strap-and-buckle fastening. 

No 8F. Each. SJt.OO 



Spalding "Semi-Pro" 
Fielders' Mill 



"* 




NO. 6F 



Face made of white tanned buck- 
skin, brown leather back; leather 
lined; laced thumb. Constructed 
throughout in a most substantial 
manner. Strap-and-buckle fas- 
tening. 
No. OF. Each, SI .BO 



Spalding "League Jr.' 
Fielders' Mill 




Very popular 1-oys" mitt. Made 

of oak tanned smooth leather, 

well padded; reinforced and laced 

at thumb. 

No 9F Each. 60c. 



Made of special tanned white lea- 
ther, is well padded and substan- 
tially made; laced at thumb. 
No. I OF Each. 20c. 

AIL STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 




Face of a good quality pearl col- 
ored leather, with olive leather 
back, well padded and leather 
lined ; reinforced and laced at 
thumb. Strap-and-buckle fas- 
tening. 
No. 7F. Each, Sl.OO 




PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TQ I 

ANT COMMUNICATIONS 

AOOHESSEOTOUS 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



101 COMPUTE LIST 01 STORES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVER 

OF THIS 8001 



ctfct! January 5, !'/> Sabjtcl to change without notice ^ lot Canadian prion *r tfxval Canadian (.atalvtuc 



ACCEPT NO 
[SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING! 



(TRADEMARK 



GUARANTEES 
QUALITY 



Spalding "Professional" 

Infielders' Glove 

(Full Leather Lined) 




Made on lines suggested by promi- 
nent professional players. Buck- 
skin used in its construction is the 
finest obtainable. Heavily padded 
around edges and little finger. 
Made extra long to protect the 
Wrist Leather lined throughout. 
K.i PXL. Each. S3. BO 



Spalding "League Special' 
Infielders* Glove 

(Full Leather Lined) 




Made throughout of specially 
J*nned calfskin. Padded with 
■*stquality felt Made extra long 
to protect wrist Highest quality 
workmanship throughout Lea- 
ther lined throughout 
No. XWL. Each, S3.00 



c 

lis 



Spalding 

Infielders' 

Gloves 

s? 



All the gloves described below are 
made regularly urith Web of lea- 
ther between Thumb and First 
Finger, which can be cut out very 
easily if not required. 




ll.lA'.VTBATtmj IHVCKTKD HEAU 



All Scalding InflatdsrV Glovas arc 

mad* with our patented dlvartad aaam 

batwaan fingars, adding considerably 

to trta durability of thaglovaa. 

rd Mat 10 



Spalding "Professional" 
Infielders' Glove 

(Not Leather Lined) 

Same glove in every particular 

as No. PXL. except not leather 

lined. 

No. I>X. Each. S3.00 



Spalding "League Extra" 
Infielders' Glove 

(Not Leather Lined) 

Same glove in every particular 

as No. RXL, except not leather 

lined. 

No. RX. Each. S3.O0 



Spalding "League Extra" 
Infielders' Glove 

(Full Leather Lined) 




NO. RXL 



Finest quality black calf. Made 
on professional model. Quality 
of material and workmanship, 
also general design similar to 
No. PXL. An absolutely highest 
quality infielders' glove. Leather 
lined throughout. 
No. RXL. Each, »3.SO 



Spalding "Professional Jr.' 

Infielders' Glove 

(Full Leather Lined) 



* 

NO. PBt 



Our best youths' glove, profes- 
sional style. Made throughout of 
selected velvet tanned buckskin. 
Quality of material, workmanship 
and style same as No. PXL best 
men's glove; an article of par- 
ticular merit. Leather lined 
throughout. 
No. PBL. Each. S2.60 



ALL STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 



ROMPT *TTEHT!0H GI«K 10 1 
m COMMUNICtTIONS 
_ ADDRESSED 10 US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I FOB COMPUTE LIST Of SIMS 

SEE INSIDE FRONT C0»£« 

OF THIS BOOK 






,/://'' \^j(.l /(. J.U/^« UltfuHji '. 



: ■/«.«/ C'anafain Cj 



Sf E THE SPALDING I 



(TRADEMARK G K N ,?, E$ 



Spalding Infielders 9 Gloves 

All tn. Glove, •'•scribed below arc mad* regularly with Web of Leather between Thumb and Fir.i Finger, which can be out 

out very eaaily If not required. All Spalding Infleldera' Glovae are made with our diverted aeam (Patented Meroh 10,19081 

between flngera, adding considerably to the durability of the glovee. 



Spalding "Intercollegiate' 
Infielders' Clove 

Fall Leather I.lnrd 




NO. 2X 



Improved style.extral'ingpatt'-rn. 
with minimum amount of padding. 
The style used by the most suc- 
cessful players. Selected velvet 
tanned buckskin; welted seams. 
Leather lined throughout. 
No. 2X. Each, S2.SO 



Spalding "Semi-Pro" 
Infielders' Clove 




NO. 3X 



Made of good quality pray buck 

tanned leather. This is a large 

model. Correctly padded and 

very popular. Welted seams. 

No. 3X. Each. S2.00 



Spalding "Inter-City" 
Infielders' Clove 

Fall Leather Lined 




NO. 2XH 



This is a professional styl.- 

made with specially padded little 

finger, and extra large thumb; 

! Beams, Made of good 

quality black calf. Leather lined 

throughout. 

No. aXR.. Each. S2.B0 



Spalding "Association' 
Infielders' Clove 



Fall Leather Lined 




Good quality olive tanned leather 
nicely padded and leather lined 
throughout, with insido hump; 
welted seams. Very good value 
No. 4X. Each, SS.OO 



Spalding "International" 
Infielders' Clove 

run Leather Lined 




Made of special quality smoked 
horse hide ; professional style, 
with specially padded little finger 
and extra large thumb ; welted 
seams. A very practical glove., 
Leather lined throughout. 
No. SY. Each, 92.60 



Spalding "Amateur' 
Infielders' Clove 




Good quality black tanned leather; 

correctly padded and extra laOP 

thumb; welted seams. Well mad 8 

throughout 

No. 3XR. Bach, »2.oO 



ALL STYLES MADE IN RICRTS AMD LEFTS 



--I 

■1 COM 
■HOI _JI 



frtOHPT ATTENTION GIVEN TD | 
.»T COMMONiCiTIONS 

IDEBiSSiOH US 



A. G.SPALDING &, BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



FOB COHPIETE LIST 

SEE IWIOE FINT ... 
01 1HIS 1001 __ 



</«( /onuu/y 5,1910. juehx/ 



Sun THE SPALDING I 



iTRADE-MARKTSf 



Spalding Infielders' Gloves 

All the Ghves described below are made regularly with web of leather between 
thumb and first finger, which can be cut out very easily if not required. 

All Spa ding Infloldora' Glovaa ar« mtd« v>lth our paUntad dlvartod aaam batwaan Angara, adding oonaidarably to 



SPALDING 
'Match' 



SPALDING 

'Club Special" 



Infielders' Glove Infielders* Glove 

Leather l.inni 



SPALDING 

" Champion " 
Infielders' Glove 



SPALDING 

"Practice" 
Infielders' Glove 




No. i i. Full, | 

Clonal style glove; made 
Jhrougbont of special 
I'ulf colored lea- 
thi-r, welted seams; cor- 
r *ctly padded. 

Each. 91.60 



N'. XL. M;ide of special^ 
white tanned leather, cor- 
rectly padded on profes- 
sional model; welted 
seams; leather lined. 

Each, SI .80 



No. XR.. Full 
lea-t her glove; profes- 
sional model; properly 
padded; welted seams. 
A very popular glove. 

Each, 81.00 



No. XS, Men'ssizeglove. 
Made of good quality 
white velvet tanned lea- 
ther: well finished: welted 
seams; inside hump. 

Each. S 1 .28 



SPALDING 

"Regulation" 
Infielders' Glove 

l-ithfr I Inrct 




No. IB. Men's size 
glove. Brown tanned lea- 
rorrectly padded 
and well made; palm lea- 
ther lined. Each. * 1 .00 



SPALDING 

"Regulation" 
Infielders' Glove 



I'.lhrr IJBri 




No. IBR.. Men's size. 
Made of good qualitv black 
tanned leather, padded, 
with inside hump; palm 
leather lined. Each SI.OO 



SPALDING 
" Interscholastlc " 
Infielders* Glove 




No. 13. Men'ssizeglove. 
Made of special white tan- 
ned leather; welted seams, 
correctly padded and very 
durable. Each. 8I.OO. 



ALL STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND LEFTS 



IpioMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO | 

«Kt CGktHUN CITlOHS 

11 — irjOKSsto lo us 



A.G.SPALDING &. BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I fOR COMPUTE LIST Of STORES 

SEE INSIDE FROM COVER 

HI THIS BOO! 



tj/t<l /-joosfy 5, I'/tQ. Sulyrti to <nur.fr uitAuuf ixtln, 



i. .::.''..■ ■-■■ 



TE THE SPALDING i 



SPALDING INFIELDERS GLOVES 

Alt the Gloves described below arc made rcyularly 
with web of itathtr between thumb and fir. ■< 
which can be cut out very easily ij' ttoj rn , 

All Spalding Infialdara'Glovaaara mada with our oatantad 

divartod aaair* batovaan fingars, adding conaidarably to 

«i» durability of tha gloves. ?,,, M.r. 10. IPX 

Spalding "Boys' Special" Inflelders' Glove 

Full Ujihff Linad 

Boys' professional style ; good quality 
tanned white leather, welted seams; leather lined 
throughout. 
No. XB. Each, SI -OO 

Spalding "Publir School" Inlielders* Glove 

Leather Lined 

Full size glove, white tanned leather, correctly padded : inside hump 
No. 12. Each. 7 5c. 





palm leather lined. , 



Spalding " I .ague Jr." 
Intklders' Clow """JS* 




Men's size. Black smooth 

tanned leather, lightly i>;i<i- 

ded. but extra long ; palm 

leather lined. 

No. I2R. Each. 70c. 



Spalding Bo>-,' Amateur" 
Infieldm' Clovt '-"".•' , 




Youths' professional style. 
Special tanneel 
correctly padded, and inside 
hump: palm lea 
No. 14. Each. 60c. 

* ALL 



Spalding "Junior" 
Inllelders' Glove U **BJ — 




Full size, craven tanned 

leather, lightly , 

but extra lonit : palm 

leather lined. 

No. I 6. Each. BOc. 



Spalding "Boys' Own" 
Inllelders Glove Lots.. 




Made of oak tanned leather. 

correctly padded; petal lea- 

ther lined. 

i ■ 2 sc. 

STYLES MADE IN RIGHTS AND 



Spalding 'Youths ' 

lul" Id. r, l,|..v. 



NO. 17 ^'•■aaararaP 



Good size, special brown 
i tanned I eather. 

nicely padded, and inside 
hump. 
i 7. Each, 50c 



Spalding "Boys' Favorite 
Inllrldrrs* Glove L 



r-: 




d tanned white leather, 
lightly padded and has in* 
side hump ; palm 

No. 10. Each, 20c. 
rrs i : 



PROMPT ATTENTION GinH TO | 

INT COMHONICiTIONS 

ID08ISSED 10 as 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARP.F CITIES 



101 COMPliTE USt Of S'? 3 
SU lUiK HWIT COW 

r, !>■: - •■'_ 






XX THE SPALDING' 



TRADE-MARK e Kf 



Spalding Base Ball Masks 



Safest and 
Best 






Spalding "Sun Protecting" Mask 

No. 4-0. Equipped with patent molded leather .sun-shade, pro- 
tecting the eyea without obstructing the view. Made throughout 
of the finest steel wire, extra heavy black finish. Fitted with 
i leather chin-strap, improved design ; hair-filled pads, in- 
cluding forehead pad and special elastic head-band. Each, S4 .OO 

Spalding "Special Soldered" Mask 

No. «-0. Each crossing of the wires . soldered. 

Extra heavy wire frame, black finish , continuous padding on 
Bides, special forehead pad and molded leather chUHuace; special 
elastic head-band and detachable cloth sun-shade. Each, »4 . OO 
Spalding Umpires' Mask 
No. G-O. For umpires. Equipped with neck protecting attach- 
ment and also a special ear protection, nicely padded, making it 
the safest and most convenient style to use. Bach, 95. OO 

Spalding "Neck Protecting" Mask 
Nu 3-0. The neck protecting arrangement is made so as not to 
re in thesligl,' movaroantfl w 

time it affords absolute protection to the neck. Fii* 
wire, extra heavy and black finish to pre 

Comfortable hair-filled pads of improved design, including fore- 
head pad and Each. S3. BO 
Spalding "National Association" Mask 
N'<. 2-0. Extra naavy bast fa i rfra. Hair-filial 
padding of in ; rn> including forehaad pad! ai 
leather chin-strap, ; haad band Each, S2.D0 

Spalding "Semi-Pro" League Mask 

Na O-P. Extra heavy beat I. lack aim 

■ 
Id-band. Each, »2. so 
Spalding "Regulation League" Catchers' Masks 
No O-X. mb 1 ., I i .--. v soft anneals I steel wire. :.■ 
blade Improved 1- thai d ;*ads, includn. 

and molded leather chin--' ' S2.00 

.'.' < OXB 

■ mr( IX, 

but smaller in si;te. Each, s 1 .7 5 

Ko O. Men's siw; heavy annealed steel wire, bright finish. 

Leather pads, including forehead pad and molded leather 

chin-strap Each. » 1 .50 





| 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I FU COHfUTE HSI OfST»S 
SI IBM FK*T CM! 

01 Kg 1001 



fWMtt t *"**"»" *.*!d*t*K. 



STHESPALDINGI 



(TRADEMARK 



Spalding "Amateur" Masks 








No. A No. B 

No. A. Men's size, black enameled steel wire, 
leather covered pads, forehead pad and molded 
chin-strap. Each. S I .OO 

Spalding "Boys' Amateur" No. B Mask 

No. B. Youths' size, black enameled st« . 

and similar in quality throughout to No. A, but 

smaller in size. . 3 1 .OO 



Spalding "Regulation" 
No. L Mask 




Spalding 
"Youths'" Masks 



No. L 

No. L. Bright wire. Men's 
size; same style as our Ama- 

4ask, but with" 
or chin-niece. Leati, 
* r ed 1 ■:, | , 7Bc. 




No. C No. D 

No. C. Bright wire, leather 
i pads with wide elas- 
tic head-strap, leather strap* 
and-buckle Each, 50c. 
NaD. Bright-wire. Slightly 
smallerin size than No. C. A 
substantial mask for boys- 
Each, 26c. 




Spalding Inflated Body Protectors 

We were the first to introduce an inflated -tor. made under the 

Oray patent and the method used then has been retained in the improved 
styles listed below with the ad.lition of a special break at the bottom which 

■■""'. ""."'•; M'"' anient Made of I t rubber, covered with 

special fabric, ... .,, When not in use can be rolled into a very 

snvill p 

«£. ihJ," „.Xi P . r "f , ' ssio ", ; 'l League Protector. Si-.ial extra strong white 

™I"'l„ vf't. 1 ' xallyallofthe 

cauhtr V nd other professional leagues. JJIO.oO 

„ ,'t- ,' '■ Covering of special imported material. 

ntlated. Full size. Each, 89. OO -. ^^ 

No. a-O. Minor League Protector. 



No-4-O 
of very durable material, 
No. I . Amateur Catchers' _ 
Brown, special quality covering', 
No. M. Interscholastic Catchers 
made. Infl.v 
No. 9. Youths' Catchers' 
Protector; good size. In- 
flated. Each. S3.00 

Spalding Umpires' 
Body Protectors 
No. L. Inflated ; large 
size, best qualitv. 

Si O.OO 
No.S. Inflated^pecial 1 ^ 
design, best qualitv. 

Each, S I O.OO 

Give length and width 

when ordering 

umpires' body protectors. 



Covering of very durable material and 
made in the best possible manner In- 
flate!. Kui! S7.50 
No. O. City League Protector. Slightly 
narrowermodelthanNo 2-0. C 

Inflated. SB.OO 

r. Same size as No 
Intla- S4.00 

Proteci' 

Each. S3.50 



£ 




Spalding Leg 

Guards for n.i-«' 

Ball Catchers 

As supplied to Roger 
Bresnahan.manage r * 
catcher of St. Loui- 
National League 
nil, and toother prorof 
nt league catchers. 
' I of molded sf'? 



cial quality 
whi' ■ 
droHd leather. 



33. Spalding 
Catchers' Leg 

Guards. 
Pair, SO.OO 




PIOMPT IfTEMTlON GIVEN T0| 

INI COMHUNICATIOHS 

MOKSiiD 10 US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



IM COMPUTE LIST Kjj* 5 

SEE IUIK FWN1 Mil", 

« HIS I0M_ 



tf«l /«, 



ISX THE SPALDING! 



(TRADEMARK 



GUARANTEES 
QUALITY 




] SPALDING BAT AND 

Spalding Bat 
Bags 



UNIFORM BAGS C 



Same as above; to hold G bats. 



So. 2. Heavy 
waterproof can- 
vas, leather re- 
Each, 93.0O 



2.0O 



^dividual Bat 
Bags 

JJo O 1 . Sole Leather Bat Bag, for two bats; 
^y all leajrue players. . Each 84 

N<> 02. 

•*><h ends. 



.v,,. 84. OO 
^0.02. Heavy waterproof canvas; leather ■ 

Each. 81 .OO 
w 0- 03. Heavy canvas, leathercapatoneend. I .OO 



Spalding 

Special 

Club Bat Bag 

Made <■: 

ith strong 

■ ■ 

•ynrnnR: k-nK-tliwise and heavy leather ends. A werj 
**" made ban throughout. 10 bats. 

No - 8. StnldinvS si 2.00 






Spalding Uniform Bags 

A convenient roll 
for packing uni-. 
forms in a manner 
which will not 
wrinkle and soil 
them. Substan- 
tially made and 
has separate compartments for shoes, etc. 
No. 2. Rag leather, well made. Each. 86. OO 

No. 1. I: canvas; leather bound, double 

leather shawl strap and handle. Each. 83. OO 

N'i. 6. Brown canvas roll; leather straps and 
handle. Each, Si. 50) 

No. 5. Com- 
bined Uniform 
and Bat Bag. 
mllar to ream* 
r uniform bags, but 
furnished with extra 
compartment to carry 
one bat. Best canvas- 
Each, 84. OO 




Wo 4. Individual Umfc 
Bast quality brown can 

■ ■ 

fastenings. Holds suit, s 

other necessary articles. 



-.2. 



■1 ui 

ill an? 



Spalding Pitchers* Box Plates 

8 <-"rdance 

with National Leagu 

and of extra quality 

with pins. Each. 87.50 



p Spalding 
Rubber Home Plates 

■ 

SL 1 quaIit > 

with pins. 8 1 0.00 



1* 



I-e-lteMag •■ ■ »* »t mhmr* »*>*■ r 
l*rlc«a om a a>e>|lratl*a. 

Spalding League Club Bat Bag 

For league clubs particularly: a special bag of extra heavy sole leather, 
ther ends; fastened with three heavy brass hamest 
th lock to secure whue (raveling. Extra heavy leather 
handle at each end for can-yin hj diameter; will hold thre* 

dozen full rise bats Just the thing for clubs with schedules requiring 
anyamountoftravelinf l,ng league Club Bat Bag. S30.0O 

Spalding Base Ball Bases 

ComphH* with Mr«p» 11J tpike* 

N o. League Club Base*, 
filled, extra quality canvas; 

Set of 3, 86.OO 
N'.. 1. Canvas, Bases, filled, 
well made; not quilted. 

Set of :i, SB. OO 

No. 9. Canvas, filled, ordi- 
naryquality. Set cf:!. S3. BO 

.".'■• 4. I 1 :< 

that they may be 
rilled with sand or other 
material. Complete with can- 
vas straps. Sat of 8, SI .OO 

Extra Straps and Spikes 

Straps for Nos.0 and 1 Bases. Ea.,BOc. 

Straps for No. 2 Bases. " «° c - 

f.rNos. and 1 Bases. " lOc. 

Spikes for No. 2 Bases. Bo • 






Composition Home Plate 

'ion size 
and shai SB.OO 

Spalding Foul Flags Hade „f bunting. 18x24 
inches; al ■ L--h side. 

Complete with 7- foot spear-head staff. Ea., SI. BO 



'IoSft iTunr.M Eimnl 

•»» COMHUIICITIOW 

joohssh n is 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I FH COHrUH IIST Of HDKS 

Sli IKSiOf HON! COftl 
01 HIS HOI 



ACCEPT NO 
SUBSTITUTE 



THE SPALDING I 



QUALITY 



^ 



=a**EB» t^^s= 



Why Spalding 
Uniforms are Best 

Because they are actually cut from measurements in the same man- 
ner as high class custom clothing, after making allowances neces- 
sary in an athletic outfit, and are not cut after block patterns 

simply to lessen manufacturing cost. 
Because we make them ourselves in our own well ventilated and 
sanitary factories, the goods never leaving our own establishment 
from the time it comes in from the mill in a piece until it goes out 
a finished garment ready for the Base Ball Player to put on. 
O ■ ^=r>«—..«— ..—»»«— p. .q 

THE INTERSCHOLASTIC UNIFORM No. 2 

Colors: White, Bine Gray, Brown Cray, Dark Cray, Black, 
Green, Maroon. Navy Blue. Brown, and Cardinal 

Made of same grade of material as our higher priced uniforms, 

but of lighter weight. This is one of our most popular suits and 

, will give the best of satisfaction. Can usually be worn two seasons. 

INTERSCHOLASTIC UNIFORM No. 2. Complete. $9.00 * 7 CA 
Net price to clubs ordering for Entire Team, Suit. *P / . J \J 

Interscholastic Shirt, any style 
In terse holastic Pants, any style 
1 Interscholastic Cap, any style 

Interscholastic Web Belt. No. 47; or. Solid Lea- 
ther Belt, No. 725; Tan, Orange or Black. 
Interscholastic Stockings, No. 2R. 
No. 2RC Striped Stockings in stock colors furnished at No Extra Charge if desired 
Special Goton Bcctra, 25c. per pair. 




HUGH JENNINGS. 

Manager of Detroit American 

League Team, Winner* of the 

American League Pennant. 

Outfitted Complete by 

G. SPALDING 4. BROS. 



No ntra charge tor ktlrrref 
lalrti with earnr el dea aer 
ler orueaablt .tents. Extra 
dtaree lor oil kflmag ea 



=9 



We have on hand a special flannel. Royal Purple, dyed particularly for teams con- 
nected with the Ori While we do not recommend that this be made up 
solid color in suits, still it makes a beautiful combination as trimming on white flannel, &t**!»$ 
and we are making these uniforms now in that way in Nos. 0, 1 and 2 qualities only. 




THE MINOR LEAGUE UNIFORM No. 



& 



M Colon: Nmvj Blue. Bin. Cmy, Dork 
Groy, Brown Groy. and White 

We have supplied this uniform in the past to some of the more prominent of the Minor League 

teams on special order, and it has proven so popular and satisfactory that we have decided to add 

it to our regular line. Well made of very durable material 

MINOR LEAGUE UNIFORM No. M. Complete. $9.00 * 7 Cfi 
Nel price to clubs ordering for Entire Team. Suit. «P / • J \J 

Minor League Shirt, any style ^ 

Minor League Pants, any style ' 
Mi nor league Cap, plain.anystyle* 
Minor League Wi-h Belt. No. 23; or Solid Leather 

Belt. No. 800; Tan or Black. 
Minor League Stockings No. IR. 
No. IRC Striped Stockings in stock colors furnished at No Extra Charge if desired 
Special Color* Ertro, 25c. per pair. 



No extra charge lor letlmei 
ibirti ntth tamr el dab aor 
leradadiabk-slmn. lura 
charge lor all Irtirnag oa 
cap*. 



SWrtl la Ihrl taller*, nill 
br *upoj«»t m Ufatrr 
Mrirjhi material, bet el 
tuer aaaHty m putt, 
bel beta will at tareJihea: 
la taatc wr If at il eetiree 



53 



PBOMPT oTTEMIIOM SIVEM TO | 

INI COMMUNICATIONS 

tPOIESSEO Til US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



01 COMPUIE US! CI SI0«£S 
SEE IDSIDE FRONT COiil 
0! IHIS 8001 _ 



<Aangc uiihout mAh-I- t v Lvi'W'j'i ptiuu tee tf/tKial Cenodion C j/oiej ut. 



suKte THE SPALDING' 




TYCOB8 



SPALDING 

Base Ball Uniforms 

Spaldini? Uniforms for Amateur and Semi-Professional 
liase Hall dubs are made in the same careful manner ana 
under exactly the same perfect eonditfwu as tneouthtswe 
supnlv to the professional League Teams ; in fact, tne 
Amateur Team secures the benefit of the many special 
features that we develop from time to time thrown constant 
association with the principal league players, little items 
of construction that do not occur to the ordinary manu- 
facturer, but which make all the difference in the world 
when it comes to actually wearing the uniforms for Dan 
playing, we incorporate in our Uniforms, without extra 
charge. The amateur clubs buying Spalding Uniforms get 
the style, fit and finish of the League outfits, but at prices 

well within their means. 
THE CITY LEAGUE UNIFORM No. P 
Good quality. In neat and attractive checks, plaids and 
pes, ibo in plain White. Finished like our best quality. 

.■■■-. "<t(, on nv::^"^; 1 ";,^^: 

litem. Suit, <p\J.yjyj GravhJi Brown with Blue SlrlpJ, 
mulsh Gr»r. Light Blue JW 
and Brown Stripe. »nd Whir 



CITY LEAGUE UNIFORM No. P. 
Net price to clubs ordering for Entire 

The City League Shirt, any style 
The City League Pants, any style 
The City League Cop, any style 
The Citv I-oag'ie Web Belt No. 23: or. Solid 

Leather Belt No. 800: Tan or Black. 
The City League Stockings. No. 8R 

No. 3RC Striped Stockings in stock colors furnished at No Extra < 'barge if desired. 

Spin ' '-•'. 25c. per pair. 

THE CLUB SPECIAL UNIFORM No. 3 

Made of good quality flannel in a variety of very deeirable pattern* Well finished and a most, 

excellent outfit for amateur clubf, 



So r*Ira charo/ lor Irtlrrino, shlrU vvilh 
namr ol club nor lor d>la*hablr sltnts. 
t.Ira fhargr lor all kllrrinfl on c»fi. 



Colon : While, Blue Cray. Brown 

Gray, Dark Gray. Maroon, Navy, 

Green, and Stack 

So Olnj thargf tor Wkring shirt. wHh 
■B»r ot dub nor lor drtndwbk tltnrs. 
Ijitn cbarn/ lor all kuertag on «P*- 



CLUB SPECIAL UNIFORM No. & Complete, $6.00 *C (\f) 
Net price to ciulis ordering for Entin ream. Suit. ->P J •\J\J 
The Clul) Special Shirt, any style 
The Clul 
The I I lap, any style 

Web Bell No. 23; or. Solid 
bath.r Bell No, 754; Tan, Orange or Black. 
ClubSpecial Stockings, No. 3R. 
No. ;;[;i large if desired. 

Sped ■'". 2BC. per pair. 

THE AMATEUR SPECIAL UNIFORM No. 4 

Made of good q favorably with unifo J» mJOtea ai a 

much higher price Very popular with 

AMAT1 [AL UNIFORM No. 4 Com.. $5.00 dtj f)0 

Bolt, vP i • V/ Vy 

Amateur Special Shirt, regular <<nly, 

eftner hutton front or lace 
padded 

Amir Cap, any style 

Am: Solid Lea- 

ther Bell No, T.">,; Tan or I I 
Amaterr Spi -t^s No. 4R. _, , . ■ D( -_i, ^nlnrs onlv. 

No. 4RC Striped Stockings furnisi, at No Extra Charge, but in stock colors only. 



Color.: While. U*ht Cray. Blue 
Gray. Brown Gray. Maroon, 

parry Blur. Orea* »*<* Black 

So rxlra rhiro* lor Mitring, shirt* *llh 
aamr ol Hob nor tor drtarfcablc slttvn. 
tura (harp/ lor all Irtlfring on eip*. 



I p »0MPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO 
»NT COMMUNICATIONS 

1^-JDOHESStD TO US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



,,il,a]«,^v5,rtlU .W,;«/ to ,kw ■ <G ■ 




KmJHESPALDINGl 



lTRADE-MARK G E N , T r E v ES 



^ 



Spalding 
Junior and Youths' Uniforms 

We make a specialty of our Junior and Youths' Uniforms 
to illustrate to the young player in a practical manner 
just what we mean by our claims of superiority in uni- 
form manufacture. We use plenty of material in every 
article— nothing is skimped; the sewing and finishing is 
carefully done, and the uniforms not only look well, but 
they feel comfortable when put on and they give good 
service even under the roughest kind of usage. 

THE SPALDING JUNIOR UNIFORM No. S 




l«|W I' Ml 



v> ealra charge lor lettering 
thirls with nimf ol dab nor 
lor detachable imH, Extra 
charge lor all lr Mr ring on 
caps. 



This uniform is made expressly for clubs composed of boys and 

youths, and will stand the hardest kind of wear. 
SPALDING JUNIOR UNIFORM No. 5. Complete, $4.00 * 2 f\Ci 
Net price to duos ortiei Suit, *j).2.UU 

Spalding Junior Shirt, style A onhy 
Spalding Juninr Pants, padded 
Spalding Junior Web Belt, No, J 
Spall ■;.. any style 

Spalding Junior Stockings, N''<. IK. 
No. 4RC Striped Stocking furnish, | at No Extra charge, hut in stock colors only. 

THE SPALDING YOUTH'S UNIFORM No. 6 
SPALDING YOUTHS' UNIFORM No. 6. Complete * 
Very well m. ; tlity Gray nur $ 

Spalding Youths': mtrimmed, button 

front: with one felt letter only 
Spalding Youths* Pants, padded only. 
Spalding Youths' Cap, styles 21 and 15. 

N'o. 5. 
Spalding Youths' Stockings. No. 4R. 
mZJ59 Sfn ' )f '' i Stockings furmahed, if desired, at No Extra Char 

SPECIAL NOIK I Whwr No. « Uniform* 



00 



So larger tiart iKta IS todi 
walit and ll-inrh rheit lor- 
nhfctd in this imitonn, I *ira 
charge tor all lettering on 

■St 



but 



»;t-.*SS ■SftLEFSKiK't&S :""» "" SMrl ' 



=^ for rrifuUr equipment described ao 

Bow lo Order Base Ball Uniforms l^SP-SW 

•PMblMW 



in stock colors only. 

ie Shirts 

prtC* MM 




?_??*.?? "'•••U'om-m blioii an MMt MIUo tn* inalruaiion* * 

■no •■• win J i.. u >i u j l minfin n«'imn up ■>«■•. »•«• 
'"•I'll ITHH..I It dut. ■!.« untK inllllilH on mpM" 

1 «!«y« from ahouldor to wrlat wi 
rtditrnm : 

Aro U r«l M|«( 1-1). Ot.t-.wn f™ waiat-bnnd to 8 inch*. Wow 
IK ln^mf ro mcrotchto8 l nch«b*towknn*-& to «) A- 
ToMocaur. for S«* Coot. Unfit 

arwjiMl choat, ^ Sl«v«, from cenior of batk f 3) to ahouldrr *| md to wrui '5) with thi 



To Meoiure for Shirt. 



To Meawrc for Panli. 



i niaod and btnt. u ahown in diagram. 
_£rprra*. C ' 



«w/i/f«/!y«Vorm_ 



Cnp_ 



J Cop*ffaW«oforo/fconrfa_ 



Sfyfro/SAirt. Uet or H,itU>n _ 

. f>AXT9-Ela*tu or Ton* ftrf' 




- iEmdm « /Vr Cmf. o/anowK *-t'A l >™^ 



-flW/J. £ratfle»<rr H'ro _ 



_ Wunu4 /or Canw. f>j/r 

_ -Shibt-. State trAefArr Fnii Lrnfflk. £»W» " 



}-vtdin..j m Ml 



>::,r.,t SnnnUn] 



■ ■ te «~ •-. «-. 



■ l» i t m n •( ipfiui ■ 



I l>r •■■■kvrv ft., a *„4 •«*••■ 



tt.r-1 .1 p (m »j«| _,„ 



mOMPT ATTENTION CIVEN TO I 

ANT COMMUNICATIONS 

AQOIESSEO TO US 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



fM COHWIf IIS! W SI* 5 
n BXFBMTCftW 

OF THIS 1001 



OSfll 

3 



KKTHESPALDINGI 



lTRADE-MARK G =f 



Spalding Base Ball 

\|1||%#C are furnished at regu- 
■Hi Id ] ar jj s t prices in either 
Style A (button front, with collar 
Plain or trimmed), Style B (but- 
ton front, V neck plain or trim- 
m ?d), or Style C (button front, 
nu'litary or standing collar plain 
° r trimmed), except in Nos. 3, 4, 
J and 6 Qualities. Style A Shirts 
furnished only in Nos. 3, 4, 5 and 
° Qualities. Shirts lettered on 
U°nt with name of club (except 
"0.6 Quality). Detachable sleeves 
5° extra charge (except No. 6 
Quality). Lace front Shirts also 
'." any except No. fi Quality. Dif- 
ferent color collar and cuffs no 
' *tra charge (except Nos. 5 and 6 
Qualities). 

Spalding 
Base Ball Shirts 

Se Farate. Any Style, with Name or Club. 
J^aljty No. O. The Spalding. Each, S6.0O 

University. 

Interschoiastie. 

Club Special 

AmateurSpecial 



f t 





BnilM tt—t vtm A HURT bn IrMl 
OHfTlnt **. I M»l« UIKrlBf 



*TYU I SmiT 
<i i M>k UWftnt 



smi C SHIRT 



Quality No. 
Quality No. a. 
quality No. 3. 
Quality No. 4. 
Quality n„. b. 
Quality No. 6. 
Be 



5.00 
3.7S 
2. SO 

a.oo 

Junior iStyle A only). I. SO 

With complete uniforms only. 

sure to send Measurement* when ordering. 

!«•«< 

Spalding Base Ball Pants 

Separate. Any Style. 
Quality No. O. The Spalding. Pair. 
nto, 

Interschoiastie. " 
CIuli Spi 
Amateur S|.«'; 
Junior. 



so oo 

BOO 
3.76 
2. SO 

a.oo 

L^Vflfti, junior. 1.60 

ben ordering give Measurements as shown 
in diagram 



quality No. ( 
Quality No. I . 
Quality •... 2. 
g^Nty No. 3. 
g^ity.Vo. 4. 
Quality N.,. s. 



Leu, 



Extras on Base Ball Shirts ^»&°5 

and ([Qualities, on which we do not furnish extras at all). 
Inlaid Collars. Stock colors only ~ 

(see cut). . Bush, aoc. 

With set of uniforms or six shirts or 

more at one time. Dozi". fl*.W 

hub. Diamonds on Sleeves. Stock colors 

only (sec cut). . . . Each Shirt, 36c. 

Size of diamond not over 6*a inches from point to 

point. Price includes one letter on diamond. 

With set of uniforms or six shirts or 







sfty" 



y 



1 1 



mora of one pn>e, 

WW« IrtKFtoi b M)T r*iil™< M lr~l 
/ tf *lrt. M r»ln cfc*OJ« Kill W »»« 

/ (•' i* ih — ' m4 Idlfr u cacb ilm«. 

Hale Sleeves, bound on kim;e. 
■■■■r Stock colors only (see cut). 

■uses boomd on nam Each Shirt. 1 Oc. 

Willi Hi of uniforms or six shirts or m<'' 

one time, no extra ■ m.ta. iianlecoiaak 

Deta. 'hahi.e Collars, i With set of uniforms or six shirts or 

. h. 60o i more at one time. )>»'», t*- ! '0 




ering on Base Ball Shirts and Coats 



The Spalding "Fox" Sliding Pad 

Imrnird by HM. 1. (OX. WaMfffr liacftln. Nrfc., B«*f Ball CliM 



EBODOEG 



^OTE— Complete name 
,l. team let-. 
c«Hr , . l . nar| Y'l"ality(ex- 
„'W No. 6 Quality i at 
I,..,''* 11 '" charge. One 

an *»«rk i^u. wi«u xr»a i—, ra> 

?*V Quality Shirts. Latum Nos. 1 and 6 are furnished on any 
JrJ'ty shirta at no extra choree. Nos. 2. I am: 
, t yl '"bed on any shirts except 5th and 6th qualities. No, 3 
left* English letters, are furnished regularly only for single 

^^*rs. I i.ameof team nor on *<th and (3lh ■; 

I MOHPT ITTENIIBII GlffiM TBI 

I x l»t COMMUNICiTldMS 

L^JLOttntssio io us 



» 




Made of durable, non-absorbent 
material. Instantly adjustable , 

aist measure. Weight 8 oi. Elast « 
band connecting the two pads is one of its 

it patent-applied-for features, as it 
holds the shirt in correct position, 
r !»l.80 



A.G.SPALDING &, BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I COMPUTE LIST If SI0«u|l 
SEE INSIDE FRONT COKI 
PI THIS BOM 



i p.,co *. ip«iW C«™J«n <.o'«4*"<. 



T£ THE SPALDING! 



Spalding Base Ball Shoes 



Because we use the best Kangaroo leather for the 
tops. Because we use the best White Oak leather for 
the soles. Because we use the finest Hand Made Steel 
Plates obtainable. Because they are made in our factory, 
under the direct supervision of experts. Many of the men 
who are working on our shoes have been in our employ for 
twenty years and over, and from their expert knowledge 
and experience, they know just what is required in an 
athlete's shoe to make it right. In addition to this, we use light weight leather, specially tanned, to 
give it the additional strength so necessary in an athletic shoe. Furthermore, when we say a shoe is 
"bench made," it is really made throughout, by hand by a shoemaker working at a bench in our factory. Th* 
plates on all of our shoes are put on carefully by hand. 



Why Spalding Shoes 
are Best 




SPECIAL NOTICE-With Base Ball Shoes that are being used continuously or fairly often. *j 

application of neats-foot oil or some good fish oil should be applied to the Rippers once every week or t*° 

weeks in order to keep them in a nice soft condition. This wiH also increase the wear of the shoes, as the 

perspiration from the foot has a tendency to deteriorate the quality of the leather. 

Spalding "Featherweight'' 
Base Ball Shoe '• 

The Lightest Base BaH 
Shoe ever made 
She 1 ikm- i t 7 l^i 
»h,w i, 18 IV 19 2* 



Spalding Highest Quality 
Base Ball Shoe 

Hand made throughout 
and of specially selected 
kangaroo leather. No 
pains or expense has been 
spared in making this 
shoe not only the very 
highest in quality, but 
perfect in every other de- 
tail. The plates are of 
the finest hand - forged 
razor steel and are firmly 
riveted to heel and sole. 

No. a-O. Pair. S7.00 




Spalding Sprinting 
Base Ball Shoe 

M.-fi.- of se- 
lected kan-i 
garooleather^ 
and built on «^„ m, » »-. Mini i » «~. 




our famous running shoef 
last. This shoe is strongly 
made. and. while extremely 
light in weight, will be found 
substantial in construction. 
Hand sewed and a strictly 
bench made shoe. Rawhide 

thong laces. 
No. 30-S. Pair, 87. OO 



,.i 



Owing to the lightness and fineness 
its construction, it is suitable for tn 
exacting demands of the f aste .:i* 
players, but as a light weight d ur TvL 
'shoe for genera] use or for the ori \\l 
ary player, we recommend our ? ' 
30-S.. which will give better wean"* 
service. Hand sewed and a strict^ 
bench made shoe. Rawhidethongl» ce * 
No. FW. Pair. »7.00 






PROKPT aTTEMTtOH GIVEN 10 1 

INI COMWINiCITIONS 

IQOilSSSEO 10 IIS 



A. G.SPALDING &. BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



| fCfl C0MPI£TE LIST Of STtWES 

SEE INSIDE FRONT COVE! 

OF THIS tOOI 



V/tw in e/eel /g, 



,. Cu" ij>an f/nuy jee tptutt teWen LtiMlufue- 



SStUhespaldingi 




Spalding 
Club Special 

Carefully selected satin calfskin, 
'"achine sewed, very substantially 
instructed, and a first-class shoe 
in every particular. Steel plates 
riveted to heel and sole. 
No. O. Per pair. 835. OO 



Spalding 
Amateur Special 

Made of good quality calfskin, 
machine sewed ; a serviceable and 
durable shoe, and one we can 
specially recommend. Plates riv- 
eted to heel and sole. 
No. 35. P« pair. S3.60 



Spalding 
Junior 

A leather shoe, made on regular 
base ball shoe last. Plates riv- 
heel and sole. An excel- 
lent shoe for the money, but not 
Guaranteed. 
No. 37. Per pair. sa.OO 



Juvenile Base Ball Shoes 

These shoes are made on special boys' size lasts which we have had made 
similar to thou II men's shoes. The shoes are made 

Factory and in exactly the manner as our regular 

men's shoes. Good quality material throughout and 
No. 3B. Furnished in boys' itzaa, 12 to - r > lo.chia.Vfl only. Pair, S2.00 



r*lfnlr« Jul! 1 




: - The Spalding Improved Ankle Supporter 



Improved on original ! I 'hich A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

■ OMM. 
Worn over or under Mocking and nopport Ihc ankle admirably, 
whll. noc Interfering In any way with free movement*. Relieve 
pain Immediately and cur. a apraln In a remarkably abort lime. 
In ordering, give »lz* o* aboe worn. 
No. H. Made of soft tanned leath- . •■ There is no seam in 

the back of this supporter, and the leather is sj>ecially shap.d l" lit 
back of foot snugly over heel. • Pair. »I.OO 

N" SH. Good quality sheepskin, well made. . * 

No. CH. Black duck, lined and bound. '• ' 



.SO 
.30 



•SrT.milTIMtlBJljl 

"i> caHMUN'CtnaHS 

IPDItSSH io us 



A. G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I !M CMrUIf 1ST OF STUBS 

SU mSlOE FMWT COKI 

Of THIS 8CD1 



' ./<«< Jahwlty 5, I') I (J .So*.;. 



t ifituel CanmAon Cu/uic.'u 




What team has won the American 
League championship the great- 
est number of times ? 

What team has been a successive 
three-time winner of the Amer- 
ican Association pennant? 

What are the only cases on record 
of a team playing three games in 
one day and winning all? 

What is the time of the shortest 
professional game on recr.nl ? 

What was the greatest number of 
victories in a major league play- 
ing season? 

What pitchers have had no-hit 
games to their credit in the 
major leagues since 1 

What year was overhand pitching 
first authorized ? 

What player made an unassisted 
triple play in 1909? 

What pitchers in the major leagues 
had over 10 successive victories 
to their credit in 1909? 

What championship teams had over 
100 victories in HW9? 

What were the total receipts of 
the World's Championship Series 
of if 

What was the date of the first 1-0 
professional contest? 

What player holds the record for 
circling the bases? 

What major league holds the record 
for greatest number of shut-out 
games in a season ? 



Who holds the longdistance throw- 
ing record ? 

Who hold the record for greatest 
number of chances accepted in 
their respective fielding posi- 
■ tions? 

Who was the leading batter in 1879? 

Who was the leading pitcher of 
the National League in the first 
year of its existence? 

Who was president of the Chicago 
club in 18767 

Who was first president of the 
National League? 

Who has led the National League 
first basemen in that position the 
greatest Dumber of tutu 

Who won the National League bat- 
ting championship the greatest 
number of times ? 

Who holds the record for succes- 
sive pitching victories? 

Who holds the record for pitching 
most consecutive games ? 

Who were the leading batters in the 
major and minor leagues in 1909? 

Who is the only player that, has 
caught a ball dropped from the 
Washington Monument ':' 

Who comprise the Grand National 
A 11- America Championship 
Team? 

Who were the major league "300' 
hittersin 1909? 

Who struck out the most batsmen 
in the National League in 1909? 



[wuii • ill niu iiaiiMiiui la;uk u ■ in i.'Vir i 

The answers to above questions, and hundreds of others, will be found 
in the new 1910 issue of 



SPALDING'SI 



OFFICIAL 
BASEBALL 



RECORD 



The contents of the 860 pages of the 1910 Kkcokd comprise fn part the 
c unplcte official averages of the major and minor leagues for 1909, with 
standing of clubs and list of previous winners in each organization since 
its inaugural | i ing account of the past year in base ball, 

presented in chronological order; charts showing the race in all of the 
major and minor leagues, presenting a graphic illustration of the fluctua- 
tions of the teams as they a Ivanced or receded from the coveted 
position; list of batsmen who have made .400 since 1871; batsmen who have 
batted .300 in any major league since ]*?<;, etc., etc. The illnsi rations are 
an important feature of the book and comprise groups of all the champion 
teams in the major and minor leagues, world's series scenes, etc. 

Spaldinc.'s Official Base Ball RECORD will be sent anywhere on 
receipt of 10 cents by any of A. G. Spaldinc & BBOft,' stores ( see list on 
Inside front cover ). 




Spalding's 
Official Base Ball Guide 

THE 1910 issue of the Guide marks the thirty-fourth year 
of its publication, and it is universally acknowledged that 
it surpasses all previous numbers in the wealth and variety 
of its contents. The illustrations especially are unusually attract- 
ive and comprise action pictures of leading players, world's 
championship scenes, minor league teams, college teams and 
individual pictures of prominent base ball writers of the United 
States. The text contains numerous special articles on timely 
base ball subjects, records, reviews, complete rosters of the 
big league teams, and the newly revised official playing rules. 

"Price 10 Cents 

Sent postpaid on receipt of price by any of A.G. Spalding & Bros.' stores 

(see list on inside front cover) 




*■ 



KSTHESPALDINGI 



TRADEMARK G E, f 



QUALITY 



Spalding's 
Official Athletic Almanac 




The 

Recognized Official 

Authority 

on all 

Matters Athletic 

Published Annually 

Price, 10 Cents 

RECORDS 
A. A. U. Champions — 

Track and Field 

Junior and Seniot 

Individual 

Indoor 

Swimming 

Indoor Swimming 

Gymnastic 

Bag Punching 

Boxing 

Wrestling 
Central Association A. A. U. 
Metropolitan Assoc. A. A. U. 
Middle Atlantic Assoc. A. A.U. 
New England Assoc. A. A. U. 
Pacific Association A. A. U. 
South Atlantic Assoc. A. A.U. 
Southern Association A. A. U. 
International Meets 
Interscholastic 







Edited by 

J. E. Sullivan 

Secretary - Treasurer 

of the 

Amateur 

Athletic Union 

of the 
United States 

RECORDS 

Running High Jumping 

Walking Broad Jumping 

Shot Putting 

Throwing the Hammer 

Throwing the Discus 

Three-Legged Race 

Sack Racing 

Javelin Kicking 

Lilting Long Dive 

Marathon Road Races 

Parallel Bar 

Relay Racing 

Rope Climbing 

Running Backwards 

Running the Base* 

Skating 

Stone Gathering 

Pole Vaulting 

Winners in Olympic Game* 

Women's Athletic Records 



PIOIIPItTTrJTlOltilr.il TO | 

MY COKlWClliONS 

tODHiSStO TO OS 



A.G.SPALDING & BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



I (01 COHFUIr IIST 01 SI0K3 
Si HOIK FWT MYU 
Of THIS 1001 . 



'tt*xt ii' ijjnt Jttnutny 5 t l'JIO. ^uhjrtl In lAongc V'lttvt/1 neUx. £ m lu'W'i/n f *** *** <fwd C»"B^»W C*'«4tf wt 



I 



rf E THESPALDINGi 



SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 
GROUP XIL- No. 331. 



Schoolyard 
Athletics 

By J. E. SULLIVAN 

President Amalear Athletic Union; 
Member Board ol Education Greater New York. 
fa 

THE great interest in ath- 
letics that has developed 
- in the public schools 
within recent years has led to 
the compilation of this book 
with a view to the systemiza- 

tion of the various events that form the distinctively 
athletic feature of school recreation. With its aid any 
teacher should be able to conduct a successful meet, while 
the directions given for becoming expert in the various 
lines will appeal to the pupil. Some of the leading 
athletes have contributed chapters on their specialties: 
Ray Ewry, holder of the world's high jump record, tells 
how to practice for that event; Harry Hillman, holder of 
the hurdle and three-legged records, gives hints on hurdle 
racing and three-legged racing; Martin Sheridan, all- 
around champion of America, gives directions for putting 
the shot; Harry F. Porter, high jump expert, describes 
how to become proficient in that event. The book is 
illustrated with photos taken especially for it in public 
schoolyards. PRICE 10 CENTS 




MonpumiTioitirtiril 

»»' coaaumcuiMS 

tCOKSSH JO IIS 



A. G.SPALDING &. BROS. 

STORES IN ALL LARGE CITIES 



r ;..." HMfiEunvini 

Sa iNSiDf («0«I M«l 
Of THIS 1001 



rtwj^^i*""' , 



• Itiwt notKt I at CunJ 



Standard Policy 



" to a Standard Policy. 

l olicy. it is impossible for a manufacturer to long 



A Standard Quality must be inseparably link* " 

Without a definite and Standard Mercantile . 
maintain a Standard Quality. 

To market his goods through the jobber, a manufacturer must provide a profit for the jobber as 
well as the retail dealer. To meet these conditions of Dual Profits, the manufacturer is obliged to 
set a proportionately high list price on his goods to the consumer. 

To enable the glib salesman, when booking his orders, to figure out attractive profits to both the 
jobber and retailer, these high list prices are absolutely essential; but their real purpose will have been 
served when the manufacturer has secured his order from the jobber, and the jobber has secured his 
order from the retailer. 

However, these deceptive high list prices are not fair to the consumer, who does not, and, in 
reality, is not ever expected to pay these fancy list prices. 

When the season opens for the sale of such goods, with their misleading but alluring high list 
prices, the retailer begins to realize his responsibilities, and grapples with the situation as best he 
can, by offering "special discounts," which vary with local trade conditions. 

Under this system of merchandising, the profits to both the manufacturer and the jobber are 
assured; but as there is no stability maintained in the prices to the consumer, the keen competition 
amongst the local dealers invariably leads to a demoralized cutting of prices by which the profits of 
the retailer are practically eliminated. 

This demoralization always reacts on the manufacturer. The jobber insists on lower, and still 
lower, prices. The manufacturer in his turn, meets this demand for the lowering of prices by the 
only way open to him, viz. : the cheapening and degrading of the quality of his product 

The foregoing conditions became so intolerable that, ten years ago, in 1899, A. G. Spalding 
& Bros, determined to rectify this demoralization in the Athletic Goods Trade, and inaugurated what 
has since become known as "The Spalding Policy." 

The "Spalding Policy" eliminates the jobber entirely, so far as Spalding Goods are concerned, 
and the retail dealer secures his supply of Spalding Athletic Goods direct from the manufacturer 
under a restricted retail price arrangement by which the retail dealer is assured a fair, legitimate and 
certain profit on all Spalding Athletic Goods, and the consumer is assured a Standard Quality and is 
protected from imposition. 

The "Spalding Policy" is decidedly for the interest and protection of the users of Athletic Goods, 
and acts in two ways: 

FIRST— The user is assured of genuine Official Standard Athletic Goods, and 

the same fixed prices to everybody 
SECOND— As manufacturers, we can proceed with confidence in purchasing at 
the proper time, the very best raw materials required in the manufacture 
of our various goods, well ahead of their respective seasons, and this enables 
us to provide the necessary quantity and absolutely maintain the Spalding 
Standard of Quality. 

All retail dealers handling Spalding Athletic Goods are required to supply consumers at our 
regular printed catalogue prices- -neither more nor less— the same prices that similar goods are sold 
for in our New York. Chicago and other stores. 

All Spalding dealers, as well as users of Spalding Athletic Goods, are treated exactly alike, and no 
special rebates or discriminations are allowed to anyone. 

Positively, nobody; not even officers, managers, salesmen or other employes of A. G. Spalding 
& Bros., or any of their relatives or personal friends, can buy Spalding Athletic Goods at a discount 
from the regular catalogue prices. 

This, briefly, is the "Spalding Policy," which has already been in successful operation for the 
past ten years, and will be indefinitely continued. 

In other words, " The Spalding Policy " is a "square deal " for everybody. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

ruiiDurr. ^■"